Wesleyan Bookstore Will Move to Main Street Next Spring

On Wednesday, Michael Roth spoke to a crowd inside 413 Main Street and announced plans to move the Wesleyan Bookstore to that location by next semester. Construction will begin in December and is expected to be completed by next spring.

“We’re committed to strengthening the ties between campus and Main Street,” said Roth. “Relocating Wesleyan’s bookstore is a major step in the direction, and I am so delighted that R.J. Julia Booksellers, with their phenomenal reputation, will be our partner in this effort.”

The announcement follows an initial proposal by Roth to move the bookstore back in April, in an effort to increase Main Street’s potential as a cultural hub for Wesleyan students and faculty as well as Middletown residents. The new 12,000-square-foot space is designed to host more events than the current Broad Street location, and “will improve first impressions for prospective students and families,” according to a Wesleyan Newsletter post following the announcement.

More news after the jump:

Apply to Work with a Thesis Mentor!

aww-kitten-on-a-computerFord Fellow Gabe Borelli writes in for all you senior thesis writers like me who are floundering about having to turn in 20 pages of something to my department next week:

Starting to feel a bit overwhelmed by your senior thesis? You’ve been researching for months, collecting information, and structuring your thoughts, but soon you actually have to start writing the thesis. Really soon. As in this weekend. After brunch. But don’t panic! You still have plenty of time to write an honors-worthy manuscript, as long as you get started soon and stay organized. The other big favor you can do for yourself? Sign up for a thesis mentor.

Your thesis mentor will work with you throughout the spring semester, meeting with you regularly to discuss any and all aspects of your thesis. Your mentor can discuss ideas with you to help structure your argument, look over that one chapter that isn’t clicking, and even read through your whole thesis before you turn it in (something your advisor might not do!). It’s incredibly beneficial to partner with someone who can keep you on task and track the development of your thesis over time.

To apply for a thesis mentor, fill out the application form HERE by Monday, December 5th at 8:00 a.m. Please note that this is a popular program and while we do our best to help everyone, we might not have the resources available to pair every applicant with a mentor. Therefore, we suggest you both apply early and make a good case in your application for why you would like to work with a mentor!

If you have any questions about the thesis mentor program, please contact Professor Meg Furniss Weisberg at mweisberg[at]wesleyan[dot]edu or Ford Fellow Gabe Borelli at writingworks[at]wesleyan[dot]edu.

Application Deadline: Monday, December 5 at 8 AM

Skull & Serpent Does the Mannequin Challenge

skullserp

If you’ve been on our site since 2AM last night, you’ll notice that a certain someone from Wesleyan’s oldest secret society, Skull & Serpent, has posted 20 links to their recently published video of their members doing the Mannequin Challenge in our Shoutbox.

The video begins with a masked member of the society vomming in the Tomb’s toilet, with another member holding back their skull. Toward the middle of the oscar-worthy performance, we see a cloaked member of the society giving birth to a baby doll. Finally, the ordeal ends with several members raising shots. So cool! Watch the vid:

Over 70 Members of the Faculty Sign Letter Calling for More Sanctuary Campus Measures

“Becoming a true sanctuary campus must be an ongoing and communal project and we urge every member of the Wesleyan community to contribute toward a collective effort to make our campus a place where international and undocumented students, faculty, and staff receive legal, physical, and emotional support.”

olinlibrary

Ever since over 100 students walked out of class on Wednesday, November 16 to express support for a petition that pressed the Wesleyan administration to declare the university a sanctuary campus for undocumented students, the subject has been the focus of conversation for numerous groups on campus.

Several of the students who helped pen the sanctuary campus petition (which received over 1300 signatures) met with Board of Trustees members during the weekend before Thanksgiving break to discuss the proposal for the creation of sanctuary campus policies. Later that weekend, President Roth declared Wesleyan a sanctuary campus in a blog post. This made Wesleyan one of the first schools in the country to adopt the label. The post was picked up by The Atlantic, The Hartford Courant, and numerous other media outlets (yikes at The Daily Caller). Oh yeah, and it lead to this exchange between President Roth and Tucker Carlson on Fox News.

The question of what constitutes a sanctuary campus is still very much an open one. Over the break, there were conversations that called for more to be done than what was promised in President Roth’s post. One student remarked that President Roth’s blog post addressed none of the concerns around CAPS that were raised in the petition. It’s also important to note that the concerns raised in the petition regarding break housing and other medical and financial needs for undocumented students were also missing from Roth’s post. Along with many others, I share the position that Wesleyan’s status as a sanctuary campus needs to be implemented as something that lasts. This kind of lasting impact is only ever achieved through the creation of full-time paid positions, collaborations between faculty, students, staff, and the administration, and other factors that outlast the infamous institutional memory purge.

Many members of the faculty, while in solidarity with the decision made by President Roth, think there is more to be done to establish Wesleyan as a sanctuary campus. Seventy-six members of the faculty signed a letter to President Roth, the Board of Trustees, and the Wesleyan community calling for a series of measures that they think will better establish Wesleyan as a sanctuary campus. Read past the jump for the full text of the letter.

Last Table Talk with Amy Bloom of the Semester!

amy-bloomFrom the Shapiro Writing Center:

Come to the Shapiro Center to celebrate writing in all shapes and forms. Drop by Table Talk to eat snacks, get feedback from Amy Bloom and praise, pity, and parse your writing and that of others. Bring a piece of writing, bring your brain, and bring your stomach. There will be snacks and cheese!

Date: Thursday, December 1
Time: 5-7 PM
Place: Shapiro Creative Writing Center

#JewishResistance: Action and Critical Dailogue

jewishresistancA really cool thing happening tomorrow:

We draw the line.

We draw the line against the appointment of Steve Bannon, Islamophobia, complacency of the American Jewish establishment in systems of oppression, anti-Semitism, the Occupation of the Palestinian territories, racism, xenophobia, transphobia, misogyny, homophobia, sexual assault, discrimination against people with disabilities, anti-native violence, police brutality…

We draw the line.

This Wednesday, Wesleyan Jewish students and the greater Wesleyan community join with over 20 communities of across the country in drawing the line as part of IfNotNow’s national day of action.* Come to Boger 114 at 12:15 to reflect before we take a stand. As a group, we will walk from Boger Hall across college row at 12:45, physically drawing the line against the appointment of Steve Bannon and the normalization of hate and violence. We have seen this before, and we will not allow our leaders to be complacent.

From IfNotNow*: “For too long, our Jewish institutions have spent the majority of their political capital on ensuring that the American government supports Israel unilaterally. Now, that stance threatens to make them complicit with newly-emboldened white nationalists that swept Trump to power on the back of anti-Semitic tropes.
Bannon, Trump and their ilk are relying on our silence as they quietly normalize the sort of hate that characterized the Trump Campaign.

The Jewish community must lead by forcefully and publicly condemning Bannon and white nationalism in the White House. History is turning on this moment.

So on Wednesday, we will once again lead our community from the streets during a Day of Jewish Resistance — demanding the Jewish community draw the line at Bannon.”

We demand accountability of Jewish communal leaders and American politicians. We invite all members of the Wesleyan community to draw the line this Wednesday.

*For more about IfNotNow, click this link to visit their website.

Date: Wednesday, November 30
Time: 12:15-1:10PM
Place: Boger Hall 114

Reading by Novelist Eugene Lim

eugene-limFrom Quinn Frenzel ’16:

On Wednesday, November 30, 8:00 pm, Russell House, 350 High Street, Middletown, CT, the Wesleyan University English Department will host a reading by novelist Eugene Lim. Lim is the author of the novels Fog & Car (Ellipsis Press, 2008), The Strangers (Black Square Editions, 2013) and Dear Cyborgs (forthcoming in 2017 from FSG Originals). His writings have appeared in Fence, Little Star, The Denver Quarterly, The Brooklyn Rail, Jacket2, Gigantic, Your Impossible Voice, The Coming Envelope, Everyday Genius and elsewhere. He runs Ellipsis Press, works as a librarian at a high school, and lives in Jackson Heights, NY. More info at his website.

Date: Wednesday, November 30
Time: 8-9:30PM
Place: Russell House

Theory Certificate Presents: Blackness and Apocalypse

Professor Matthew Garrett writes in:

“Blackness and the Politics of Apocalyptic Imaginaries,” a lecture by Axelle Karera (Philosophy, Wesleyan):

Though to deny the geological impact of human force on nature is now essentially quasi-criminal, many theorists (mostly in the humanities) remain, nonetheless, unimpressed with what this “new era” has afforded us in terms of critical potential. From accusations that what we now call the “Anthropocene” has merely established a hegemony of brute facts at the expense of critique, to concerns about the multiple ways in which the term continues to obscure socio-ecological relations of catastrophic nature, it is fair to say that the many scenes of the Anthropocene are still contested terrains. In this paper, Prof. Karera is concerned with what Srinivas Aravamudan deems “the escapist philosophy of various dimension of the hypothesis concerning the Anthropocene”. Following Erik Swyngedouw’s recent indictment of apocalyptic discourses’ vital role in displacing social antagonisms and nurturing capitalism, Prof. Karera argues that the new regime of Anthropocenean consciousness has been powerful in disavowing racial antagonisms. Prof. Karera discuss the ways in which it has foreclosed proper political framings while, simultaneously, it has continued to construct and maintain growing numbers of both new and old enemies along racial lines. Prof. Karera contends that the “political Anthropocene” (if there is or ought to be one) will remain an impossibility until it is able to wrestle with the problem of black suffering.

Date: Wednesday, November 30
Time: 4:30-6PM
Place: Downey 113

Classic Mystery Book Discussion

classicmysteries_moonstone-e1478897729894This is a cool event happening at Russell Library:

Amy Slowik from Russell Library (123 Broad Street) is starting a lunchtime mystery book group, and the Wesleyan community is welcome. The first book is “The Moonstone” by Wilkie Collins.

“This spellbinding tale of romance, theft, and murder introduced a hugely popular genre –the detective mystery. When a young English woman inherits a large, ill-gotten diamond sacred to Hindu moon god, the diamond soon disappears. The accused seeks to clear his name amid a series of sinister and deadly events. Bring your lunch if you’d like, and join the group for a discussion of one of the founding mystery-detective novels. Free; drop-in, no registration.”

Date: Tuesday, November 29
Time: 12-1PM
Place: Russell Library (123 Broad St.)