Maybe Wes should be next?

Looks like U.S. News and World Report is being dealt another setback as some smart college administrators realize that playing up your school’s numbers isn’t the best way to get top-notch frosh. From the New York Times:

The presidents of dozens of liberal arts colleges have decided to stop participating in the annual college rankings by U.S. News and World Report.

The decision was announced Tuesday at the end of an annual meeting of the Annapolis Group, a loose association of liberal arts colleges. After two days of private meetings here, the organization released a statement that said a majority of the 80 presidents attending had “expressed their intent not to participate in the annual U.S. News survey.”

The commitment, which some college presidents said was made by a large majority of participants, represents the most significant challenge yet to the rankings, adding colleges like Barnard, Sarah Lawrence and Kenyon to a growing rebellion against the magazine, participants said.

I forgot to mention that I’m Wesleyan’s representative for the U.S. Board of Higher Education Statistics, the consortium that these schools will work with to develop a new college ratings guide.

Just kidding. :-P

29 thoughts on “Maybe Wes should be next?

  1. Anonymous

    I agree with the other person, that the rankings should stay. I mean, differentiating among different colleges for academic rigor is fairly important. I think (don’t shoot me for saying this) the SAT range can do a good job of that. I do think that generally speaking, the SAT does a decent job at seeing how intelligent you are – yes, there are racial and cultural biases that are unfair, but it’s better than the other things we’ve got. And it was pretty helpful for me to see which schools were 1400-1600 schools and which schools were 1100-1300 schools. I honestly don’t think I would have been as happy and intellectually challenged if I’d been with peers at the 1100-1300 schools. I’m not saying anything against any individual who got in that range – clearly you got into Wesleyan for a reason and clearly there are other factors into what makes an intelligent person than SAT score – but it’s a pretty good rough gauge.

  2. Anonymous

    I agree with the other person, that the rankings should stay. I mean, differentiating among different colleges for academic rigor is fairly important. I think (don’t shoot me for saying this) the SAT range can do a good job of that. I do think that generally speaking, the SAT does a decent job at seeing how intelligent you are – yes, there are racial and cultural biases that are unfair, but it’s better than the other things we’ve got. And it was pretty helpful for me to see which schools were 1400-1600 schools and which schools were 1100-1300 schools. I honestly don’t think I would have been as happy and intellectually challenged if I’d been with peers at the 1100-1300 schools. I’m not saying anything against any individual who got in that range – clearly you got into Wesleyan for a reason and clearly there are other factors into what makes an intelligent person than SAT score – but it’s a pretty good rough gauge.

  3. Anonymous

    I agree with the other person, that the rankings should stay. I mean, differentiating among different colleges for academic rigor is fairly important. I think (don’t shoot me for saying this) the SAT range can do a good job of that. I do think that generally speaking, the SAT does a decent job at seeing how intelligent you are – yes, there are racial and cultural biases that are unfair, but it’s better than the other things we’ve got. And it was pretty helpful for me to see which schools were 1400-1600 schools and which schools were 1100-1300 schools. I honestly don’t think I would have been as happy and intellectually challenged if I’d been with peers at the 1100-1300 schools. I’m not saying anything against any individual who got in that range – clearly you got into Wesleyan for a reason and clearly there are other factors into what makes an intelligent person than SAT score – but it’s a pretty good rough gauge.

  4. Anonymous

    I agree with the other person, that the rankings should stay. I mean, differentiating among different colleges for academic rigor is fairly important. I think (don’t shoot me for saying this) the SAT range can do a good job of that. I do think that generally speaking, the SAT does a decent job at seeing how intelligent you are – yes, there are racial and cultural biases that are unfair, but it’s better than the other things we’ve got. And it was pretty helpful for me to see which schools were 1400-1600 schools and which schools were 1100-1300 schools. I honestly don’t think I would have been as happy and intellectually challenged if I’d been with peers at the 1100-1300 schools. I’m not saying anything against any individual who got in that range – clearly you got into Wesleyan for a reason and clearly there are other factors into what makes an intelligent person than SAT score – but it’s a pretty good rough gauge.

  5. Anonymous

    I agree with the other person, that the rankings should stay. I mean, differentiating among different colleges for academic rigor is fairly important. I think (don’t shoot me for saying this) the SAT range can do a good job of that. I do think that generally speaking, the SAT does a decent job at seeing how intelligent you are – yes, there are racial and cultural biases that are unfair, but it’s better than the other things we’ve got. And it was pretty helpful for me to see which schools were 1400-1600 schools and which schools were 1100-1300 schools. I honestly don’t think I would have been as happy and intellectually challenged if I’d been with peers at the 1100-1300 schools. I’m not saying anything against any individual who got in that range – clearly you got into Wesleyan for a reason and clearly there are other factors into what makes an intelligent person than SAT score – but it’s a pretty good rough gauge.

  6. Anonymous

    I think rankings are particularly pointless for a place like Wesleyan, since Wes has a rather significant reputation that advertises the “rigor” of a Wesleyan education without the need for arbitrary rankings.

  7. Anonymous

    I think rankings are particularly pointless for a place like Wesleyan, since Wes has a rather significant reputation that advertises the “rigor” of a Wesleyan education without the need for arbitrary rankings.

  8. Anonymous

    I think rankings are particularly pointless for a place like Wesleyan, since Wes has a rather significant reputation that advertises the “rigor” of a Wesleyan education without the need for arbitrary rankings.

  9. Anonymous

    I think rankings are particularly pointless for a place like Wesleyan, since Wes has a rather significant reputation that advertises the “rigor” of a Wesleyan education without the need for arbitrary rankings.

  10. Anonymous

    I think rankings are particularly pointless for a place like Wesleyan, since Wes has a rather significant reputation that advertises the “rigor” of a Wesleyan education without the need for arbitrary rankings.

  11. Anonymous

    I think we should stick with the U.S. News and World Report rankings until something better can be created. There are those who will say not to participate at all in rankings, but while rankings are far from perfect, they allow someone to differentiate the academic rigor of Wesleyan against, say Ohio Wesleyan.

  12. Anonymous

    I think we should stick with the U.S. News and World Report rankings until something better can be created. There are those who will say not to participate at all in rankings, but while rankings are far from perfect, they allow someone to differentiate the academic rigor of Wesleyan against, say Ohio Wesleyan.

  13. Anonymous

    I think we should stick with the U.S. News and World Report rankings until something better can be created. There are those who will say not to participate at all in rankings, but while rankings are far from perfect, they allow someone to differentiate the academic rigor of Wesleyan against, say Ohio Wesleyan.

  14. Anonymous

    I think we should stick with the U.S. News and World Report rankings until something better can be created. There are those who will say not to participate at all in rankings, but while rankings are far from perfect, they allow someone to differentiate the academic rigor of Wesleyan against, say Ohio Wesleyan.

  15. Anonymous

    I think we should stick with the U.S. News and World Report rankings until something better can be created. There are those who will say not to participate at all in rankings, but while rankings are far from perfect, they allow someone to differentiate the academic rigor of Wesleyan against, say Ohio Wesleyan.

  16. Anonymous

    Don’t know if anyone caught this but I guess at least one Doug Bennett agrees (From CNN): Doug Bennett, president of Earlham College — ranked 65th by U.S. News and World Report for liberal arts colleges — told CNN that “one ranking number does not represent anything about educational quality.”

  17. Anonymous

    Don’t know if anyone caught this but I guess at least one Doug Bennett agrees (From CNN): Doug Bennett, president of Earlham College — ranked 65th by U.S. News and World Report for liberal arts colleges — told CNN that “one ranking number does not represent anything about educational quality.”

  18. Anonymous

    Don’t know if anyone caught this but I guess at least one Doug Bennett agrees (From CNN): Doug Bennett, president of Earlham College — ranked 65th by U.S. News and World Report for liberal arts colleges — told CNN that “one ranking number does not represent anything about educational quality.”

  19. Anonymous

    Don’t know if anyone caught this but I guess at least one Doug Bennett agrees (From CNN): Doug Bennett, president of Earlham College — ranked 65th by U.S. News and World Report for liberal arts colleges — told CNN that “one ranking number does not represent anything about educational quality.”

  20. Anonymous

    Don’t know if anyone caught this but I guess at least one Doug Bennett agrees (From CNN):

    Doug Bennett, president of Earlham College — ranked 65th by U.S. News and World Report for liberal arts colleges — told CNN that “one ranking number does not represent anything about educational quality.”

  21. Anonymous

    ratings arent perfect, but there needs to be something to communicate what the school is like other than official wesleyan propaganda. until something better is developed, we should stick to the status quo

  22. Anonymous

    ratings arent perfect, but there needs to be something to communicate what the school is like other than official wesleyan propaganda. until something better is developed, we should stick to the status quo

  23. Anonymous

    ratings arent perfect, but there needs to be something to communicate what the school is like other than official wesleyan propaganda. until something better is developed, we should stick to the status quo

  24. Anonymous

    ratings arent perfect, but there needs to be something to communicate what the school is like other than official wesleyan propaganda. until something better is developed, we should stick to the status quo

  25. Anonymous

    ratings arent perfect, but there needs to be something to communicate what the school is like other than official wesleyan propaganda. until something better is developed, we should stick to the status quo

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