And my mother wants me to marry a doctor

College-educated women making 80% as much as their male peers? US News & World Report: “It’s yer own damn fault”. Pardon me, I’ve a pie to bake.

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45 thoughts on “And my mother wants me to marry a doctor

  1. Holly

    Sigh, problem with the article is that it’s essentially blaming the victim. Which makes Xue’s ‘it’s yer own damn fault’ analysis correct. It’s basically saying that because women concentrate in low-paying sectors like education, it’s their fault they aren’t earning as much as their peers.However, as Marianna contends, USNWR is just as likely to bemoan the lack of interest in fields like education by men and the dearth of qualified teachers overall, especially in, say, low-income schools. So there’s the problem. Jobs that are seen as vital to our social existence, say, education, pyschology, childcare, nursing, etc, that tend to attract a higher ratio of females to males do sadly pay less than fields that are perhaps less immediately vital–say finance or I-banking. Imagine the same argument applied to low-income or minorities. If it was shown that blacks were turning to nursing in more numbers than they were going into health insurance, this logic would essentially say, “Yeah, you deserve what you get for making that career choice.” Rather than question an economic system which places more value on billing than care. It’s too easy to blame the victim and all too difficult to question the underlying social forces that suppress the wages of jobs women tend to concentrate in.

  2. Holly

    Sigh, problem with the article is that it’s essentially blaming the victim. Which makes Xue’s ‘it’s yer own damn fault’ analysis correct. It’s basically saying that because women concentrate in low-paying sectors like education, it’s their fault they aren’t earning as much as their peers.However, as Marianna contends, USNWR is just as likely to bemoan the lack of interest in fields like education by men and the dearth of qualified teachers overall, especially in, say, low-income schools. So there’s the problem. Jobs that are seen as vital to our social existence, say, education, pyschology, childcare, nursing, etc, that tend to attract a higher ratio of females to males do sadly pay less than fields that are perhaps less immediately vital–say finance or I-banking. Imagine the same argument applied to low-income or minorities. If it was shown that blacks were turning to nursing in more numbers than they were going into health insurance, this logic would essentially say, “Yeah, you deserve what you get for making that career choice.” Rather than question an economic system which places more value on billing than care. It’s too easy to blame the victim and all too difficult to question the underlying social forces that suppress the wages of jobs women tend to concentrate in.

  3. Holly

    Sigh, problem with the article is that it’s essentially blaming the victim. Which makes Xue’s ‘it’s yer own damn fault’ analysis correct. It’s basically saying that because women concentrate in low-paying sectors like education, it’s their fault they aren’t earning as much as their peers.However, as Marianna contends, USNWR is just as likely to bemoan the lack of interest in fields like education by men and the dearth of qualified teachers overall, especially in, say, low-income schools. So there’s the problem. Jobs that are seen as vital to our social existence, say, education, pyschology, childcare, nursing, etc, that tend to attract a higher ratio of females to males do sadly pay less than fields that are perhaps less immediately vital–say finance or I-banking. Imagine the same argument applied to low-income or minorities. If it was shown that blacks were turning to nursing in more numbers than they were going into health insurance, this logic would essentially say, “Yeah, you deserve what you get for making that career choice.” Rather than question an economic system which places more value on billing than care. It’s too easy to blame the victim and all too difficult to question the underlying social forces that suppress the wages of jobs women tend to concentrate in.

  4. Holly

    Sigh, problem with the article is that it’s essentially blaming the victim. Which makes Xue’s ‘it’s yer own damn fault’ analysis correct. It’s basically saying that because women concentrate in low-paying sectors like education, it’s their fault they aren’t earning as much as their peers.However, as Marianna contends, USNWR is just as likely to bemoan the lack of interest in fields like education by men and the dearth of qualified teachers overall, especially in, say, low-income schools. So there’s the problem. Jobs that are seen as vital to our social existence, say, education, pyschology, childcare, nursing, etc, that tend to attract a higher ratio of females to males do sadly pay less than fields that are perhaps less immediately vital–say finance or I-banking. Imagine the same argument applied to low-income or minorities. If it was shown that blacks were turning to nursing in more numbers than they were going into health insurance, this logic would essentially say, “Yeah, you deserve what you get for making that career choice.” Rather than question an economic system which places more value on billing than care. It’s too easy to blame the victim and all too difficult to question the underlying social forces that suppress the wages of jobs women tend to concentrate in.

  5. Holly

    Sigh, problem with the article is that it’s essentially blaming the victim. Which makes Xue’s ‘it’s yer own damn fault’ analysis correct.

    It’s basically saying that because women concentrate in low-paying sectors like education, it’s their fault they aren’t earning as much as their peers.

    However, as Marianna contends, USNWR is just as likely to bemoan the lack of interest in fields like education by men and the dearth of qualified teachers overall, especially in, say, low-income schools.

    So there’s the problem. Jobs that are seen as vital to our social existence, say, education, pyschology, childcare, nursing, etc, that tend to attract a higher ratio of females to males do sadly pay less than fields that are perhaps less immediately vital–say finance or I-banking.

    Imagine the same argument applied to low-income or minorities. If it was shown that blacks were turning to nursing in more numbers than they were going into health insurance, this logic would essentially say, “Yeah, you deserve what you get for making that career choice.” Rather than question an economic system which places more value on billing than care.

    It’s too easy to blame the victim and all too difficult to question the underlying social forces that suppress the wages of jobs women tend to concentrate in.

  6. Mad Joy

    Xue, I didn’t mean that. I just think that it’s easy to dismiss the points out of feminism, but I think someone who is really feminist will acknowledge some of those reasons for why women are underearning as true and reasonable factors, and try to see how those symptoms are also problems that need to be addressed before the larger issue of salary is addressed.So examining why more women don’t go into engineering (because, let’s face it, they don’t) is important. And to be honest, I *do* have the impression that while even if I get a good job, I’ll have a husband who will be a co-wage-earner who will be making just as much as I do. Maybe this is a bad assumption and one I’m a little embarrassed to admit to other Wesleyan students, but it’s a belief I’ve grown up having, and that I actually find to be a little comforting. I feel like I could have a job that I love and that isn’t just about making money. Maybe that’s more of a Wesleyan thing than a woman thing, but I don’t know. I just think the article makes some valid points – it’s not that it’s the individual woman’s fault, but there are cultural forces driving women in directions that make less money, instead of just pure overt discrimination.

  7. Mad Joy

    Xue, I didn’t mean that. I just think that it’s easy to dismiss the points out of feminism, but I think someone who is really feminist will acknowledge some of those reasons for why women are underearning as true and reasonable factors, and try to see how those symptoms are also problems that need to be addressed before the larger issue of salary is addressed.So examining why more women don’t go into engineering (because, let’s face it, they don’t) is important. And to be honest, I *do* have the impression that while even if I get a good job, I’ll have a husband who will be a co-wage-earner who will be making just as much as I do. Maybe this is a bad assumption and one I’m a little embarrassed to admit to other Wesleyan students, but it’s a belief I’ve grown up having, and that I actually find to be a little comforting. I feel like I could have a job that I love and that isn’t just about making money. Maybe that’s more of a Wesleyan thing than a woman thing, but I don’t know. I just think the article makes some valid points – it’s not that it’s the individual woman’s fault, but there are cultural forces driving women in directions that make less money, instead of just pure overt discrimination.

  8. Mad Joy

    Xue, I didn’t mean that. I just think that it’s easy to dismiss the points out of feminism, but I think someone who is really feminist will acknowledge some of those reasons for why women are underearning as true and reasonable factors, and try to see how those symptoms are also problems that need to be addressed before the larger issue of salary is addressed.So examining why more women don’t go into engineering (because, let’s face it, they don’t) is important. And to be honest, I *do* have the impression that while even if I get a good job, I’ll have a husband who will be a co-wage-earner who will be making just as much as I do. Maybe this is a bad assumption and one I’m a little embarrassed to admit to other Wesleyan students, but it’s a belief I’ve grown up having, and that I actually find to be a little comforting. I feel like I could have a job that I love and that isn’t just about making money. Maybe that’s more of a Wesleyan thing than a woman thing, but I don’t know. I just think the article makes some valid points – it’s not that it’s the individual woman’s fault, but there are cultural forces driving women in directions that make less money, instead of just pure overt discrimination.

  9. Mad Joy

    Xue, I didn’t mean that. I just think that it’s easy to dismiss the points out of feminism, but I think someone who is really feminist will acknowledge some of those reasons for why women are underearning as true and reasonable factors, and try to see how those symptoms are also problems that need to be addressed before the larger issue of salary is addressed.So examining why more women don’t go into engineering (because, let’s face it, they don’t) is important. And to be honest, I *do* have the impression that while even if I get a good job, I’ll have a husband who will be a co-wage-earner who will be making just as much as I do. Maybe this is a bad assumption and one I’m a little embarrassed to admit to other Wesleyan students, but it’s a belief I’ve grown up having, and that I actually find to be a little comforting. I feel like I could have a job that I love and that isn’t just about making money. Maybe that’s more of a Wesleyan thing than a woman thing, but I don’t know. I just think the article makes some valid points – it’s not that it’s the individual woman’s fault, but there are cultural forces driving women in directions that make less money, instead of just pure overt discrimination.

  10. Mad Joy

    Xue, I didn’t mean that. I just think that it’s easy to dismiss the points out of feminism, but I think someone who is really feminist will acknowledge some of those reasons for why women are underearning as true and reasonable factors, and try to see how those symptoms are also problems that need to be addressed before the larger issue of salary is addressed.

    So examining why more women don’t go into engineering (because, let’s face it, they don’t) is important. And to be honest, I *do* have the impression that while even if I get a good job, I’ll have a husband who will be a co-wage-earner who will be making just as much as I do. Maybe this is a bad assumption and one I’m a little embarrassed to admit to other Wesleyan students, but it’s a belief I’ve grown up having, and that I actually find to be a little comforting. I feel like I could have a job that I love and that isn’t just about making money. Maybe that’s more of a Wesleyan thing than a woman thing, but I don’t know. I just think the article makes some valid points – it’s not that it’s the individual woman’s fault, but there are cultural forces driving women in directions that make less money, instead of just pure overt discrimination.

  11. Anonymous

    God I hate that fucking magazine. Ignorant, conservative assholes. – Feminist Male

  12. Marianna

    No, Xue, I’m with you on that reading. The bottom line that they present is “Women don’t think they have to get real jobs because they plan on marrying rich”. Whereas the next article that comes along is probably going to chastise high-earners as greedy/money-grubbing.

  13. Marianna

    No, Xue, I’m with you on that reading. The bottom line that they present is “Women don’t think they have to get real jobs because they plan on marrying rich”. Whereas the next article that comes along is probably going to chastise high-earners as greedy/money-grubbing.

  14. Marianna

    No, Xue, I’m with you on that reading. The bottom line that they present is “Women don’t think they have to get real jobs because they plan on marrying rich”. Whereas the next article that comes along is probably going to chastise high-earners as greedy/money-grubbing.

  15. Marianna

    No, Xue, I’m with you on that reading. The bottom line that they present is “Women don’t think they have to get real jobs because they plan on marrying rich”. Whereas the next article that comes along is probably going to chastise high-earners as greedy/money-grubbing.

  16. Marianna

    No, Xue, I’m with you on that reading. The bottom line that they present is “Women don’t think they have to get real jobs because they plan on marrying rich”. Whereas the next article that comes along is probably going to chastise high-earners as greedy/money-grubbing.

  17. Anonymous

    I highly doubt that wes women go through college under the assumption that they are going to get married and be taken care of as soon as they graduate… I know I’ve always assumed I *would* be the primary wage earner.Also, education has traditionally been women’s work; engineering was, until recently, dominated by men. Is it really our fault that our society values their work less?I don’t think your educational choices should be governed by money (obv, i go to wes..) – but I also think this article is full of assumptions. It’s always about the fucking babies, isn’t it? Family unit be damned.

  18. Anonymous

    I highly doubt that wes women go through college under the assumption that they are going to get married and be taken care of as soon as they graduate… I know I’ve always assumed I *would* be the primary wage earner.Also, education has traditionally been women’s work; engineering was, until recently, dominated by men. Is it really our fault that our society values their work less?I don’t think your educational choices should be governed by money (obv, i go to wes..) – but I also think this article is full of assumptions. It’s always about the fucking babies, isn’t it? Family unit be damned.

  19. Anonymous

    I highly doubt that wes women go through college under the assumption that they are going to get married and be taken care of as soon as they graduate… I know I’ve always assumed I *would* be the primary wage earner.Also, education has traditionally been women’s work; engineering was, until recently, dominated by men. Is it really our fault that our society values their work less?I don’t think your educational choices should be governed by money (obv, i go to wes..) – but I also think this article is full of assumptions. It’s always about the fucking babies, isn’t it? Family unit be damned.

  20. Anonymous

    I highly doubt that wes women go through college under the assumption that they are going to get married and be taken care of as soon as they graduate… I know I’ve always assumed I *would* be the primary wage earner.Also, education has traditionally been women’s work; engineering was, until recently, dominated by men. Is it really our fault that our society values their work less?I don’t think your educational choices should be governed by money (obv, i go to wes..) – but I also think this article is full of assumptions. It’s always about the fucking babies, isn’t it? Family unit be damned.

  21. Anonymous

    I highly doubt that wes women go through college under the assumption that they are going to get married and be taken care of as soon as they graduate… I know I’ve always assumed I *would* be the primary wage earner.

    Also, education has traditionally been women’s work; engineering was, until recently, dominated by men. Is it really our fault that our society values their work less?

    I don’t think your educational choices should be governed by money (obv, i go to wes..) – but I also think this article is full of assumptions. It’s always about the fucking babies, isn’t it? Family unit be damned.

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