Dining Staff Updates

Guys, I love Wendy. Finding out that she’s getting shafted personally pisses me off, but the entire idea of BA shifting the books in order to shaft nine-year veterans to deny them benefits infuriates me, especially since they’re supposed to be the “socially conscious” dining service.

So because the email is vague and we don’t know exactly what’s going on, I have sent out emails to Dean Rick (rculliton@wes), BA’s district manager (dcrim@wes), Wesleyan’s human resources department and Wendy.

We’ll keep you updated with their reply.

(I’m not even sure who is the “right” person to contact, so I sent out a barrage. Feel free to do the same.)

There’s also a “Feedback” page on BA’s Wesleyan page.

Edit: Mad Weiss ’09 comments:

I think it was clear when Bon Apetit was chosen that the students and workers really wanted a provider that would keep the benefits that the worker’s union had fought for and won with Aramark – and Bon Apetit promised to deliver.

It should come as a surprise, because I think a lot of people would have been more hesitant to choose Bon Apetit over Aramark if they knew it meant really adverse effects for the workers – but BA promised again and again that it was all fair and clean.

So, if this does turn out to be true, I think it’s reasonable to be surprised and angry.

12 thoughts on “Dining Staff Updates

  1. Justin

    Angry, yes. But I still think people should have seen this coming.No matter what BA told the Dining Committee to get the contract, there was no way we could reap all the benefits that Bon Appetit talked about (premium food, support for workers’ rights, sustainability, local produce, convenient hours, etc.) without taking a hit in the pocketbook.I’m not privy to all the financial aspects that go into the BA contract, but it only makes sense that BA wouldn’t be able to deliver on all its promises without charging substantially more for the meal plans.With a certain amount of resources, something had to go. And was it going to be Bon Appetit’s freshly baked artisan breads, or a schedule that allows its employees to collect expensive benefits. Hmm…

  2. Justin

    Angry, yes. But I still think people should have seen this coming.No matter what BA told the Dining Committee to get the contract, there was no way we could reap all the benefits that Bon Appetit talked about (premium food, support for workers’ rights, sustainability, local produce, convenient hours, etc.) without taking a hit in the pocketbook.I’m not privy to all the financial aspects that go into the BA contract, but it only makes sense that BA wouldn’t be able to deliver on all its promises without charging substantially more for the meal plans.With a certain amount of resources, something had to go. And was it going to be Bon Appetit’s freshly baked artisan breads, or a schedule that allows its employees to collect expensive benefits. Hmm…

  3. Justin

    Angry, yes. But I still think people should have seen this coming.

    No matter what BA told the Dining Committee to get the contract, there was no way we could reap all the benefits that Bon Appetit talked about (premium food, support for workers’ rights, sustainability, local produce, convenient hours, etc.) without taking a hit in the pocketbook.

    I’m not privy to all the financial aspects that go into the BA contract, but it only makes sense that BA wouldn’t be able to deliver on all its promises without charging substantially more for the meal plans.

    With a certain amount of resources, something had to go. And was it going to be Bon Appetit’s freshly baked artisan breads, or a schedule that allows its employees to collect expensive benefits. Hmm…

  4. Mad Joy

    But I think it was clear when Bon Apetit was chosen that the students and workers really wanted a provider that would keep the benefits that the worker’s union had fought for and won with Aramark – and Bon Apetit promised to deliver.It should come as a surprise, because I think a lot of people would have been more hesitant to choose Bon Apetit over Aramark if they knew it meant really adverse effects for the workers – but BA promised again and again that it was all fair and clean.So, if this does turn out to be true, I think it’s reasonable to be surprised and angry.

  5. Mad Joy

    But I think it was clear when Bon Apetit was chosen that the students and workers really wanted a provider that would keep the benefits that the worker’s union had fought for and won with Aramark – and Bon Apetit promised to deliver.It should come as a surprise, because I think a lot of people would have been more hesitant to choose Bon Apetit over Aramark if they knew it meant really adverse effects for the workers – but BA promised again and again that it was all fair and clean.So, if this does turn out to be true, I think it’s reasonable to be surprised and angry.

  6. Mad Joy

    But I think it was clear when Bon Apetit was chosen that the students and workers really wanted a provider that would keep the benefits that the worker’s union had fought for and won with Aramark – and Bon Apetit promised to deliver.

    It should come as a surprise, because I think a lot of people would have been more hesitant to choose Bon Apetit over Aramark if they knew it meant really adverse effects for the workers – but BA promised again and again that it was all fair and clean.

    So, if this does turn out to be true, I think it’s reasonable to be surprised and angry.

  7. Justin

    What is surprising about this? A corporation is in business to make a profit. Things that cost them money make them less profit. Hence, they will try to avoid things that cost them money. They will do things like arrange hours so that employees can’t get full-time benefits.It’s business. It’s not right, but it’s business, and it shouldn’t come as a surprise.

  8. Justin

    What is surprising about this? A corporation is in business to make a profit. Things that cost them money make them less profit. Hence, they will try to avoid things that cost them money. They will do things like arrange hours so that employees can’t get full-time benefits.It’s business. It’s not right, but it’s business, and it shouldn’t come as a surprise.

  9. Justin

    What is surprising about this? A corporation is in business to make a profit. Things that cost them money make them less profit. Hence, they will try to avoid things that cost them money. They will do things like arrange hours so that employees can’t get full-time benefits.

    It’s business. It’s not right, but it’s business, and it shouldn’t come as a surprise.

  10. Anonymous

    Finally something worth getting angry at Bon Appetit for. We were all waiting for it, weren’t we?Seriously, though, Wendy is one of the kindest people I’ve met at Wesleyan and we better raise hell until this is settled satisfactorily.

  11. Anonymous

    Finally something worth getting angry at Bon Appetit for. We were all waiting for it, weren’t we?Seriously, though, Wendy is one of the kindest people I’ve met at Wesleyan and we better raise hell until this is settled satisfactorily.

  12. Anonymous

    Finally something worth getting angry at Bon Appetit for. We were all waiting for it, weren’t we?

    Seriously, though, Wendy is one of the kindest people I’ve met at Wesleyan and we better raise hell until this is settled satisfactorily.

Comments are closed.