STEP IT UP

This Saturday, November 3rd, the Step it Up 2007 day of action to combat climate change will take place at thousands of locations across the country.

At 11:00 there will be a march across the Middletown-Portland bridge and at 12:00, there will be a rally on Foss Hill with live music, free energy-saving flourescent light bulbs, an information booth and hands-on recycling sorting to create an artistic, visual reminder of Wesleyan’s commitment to environmentalism.

The three objectives of Step it Up are:

  1. no new coal plants
  2. 80%reduction in carbon emissions by 2050
  3. 5 million new green jobs.

What: Step it Up Rally/March
When: November 3rd at noon on Foss Hill (or 11 on the Middletown-Portland Bridge)

10 thoughts on “STEP IT UP

  1. Anonymous

    Okay, nice talking points. Too bad the economics behind them don’t make any sense.Lighter car frames might make sense, but a bunch of heavy, noxious batteries do not. “Hydrogen” power is a copout – hydrogen is not a source of energy, it is a means of storing energy. And not a particularly efficient one at that.Think about why “alternative energy” is so expensive – because it is, again, less efficient. Government subsidies would just be distorting the market and displacing the pollution – for example, into the extremely environmentally unfriendly production of photovoltaic cells or batteries. Anything that actually used less energy would de facto pay for itself, so subsidies ought to be unnecessary for the most part. Carbon taxes may actually be worthwhile, but that is not quite the same thing as a subsidy.The Kyoto Protocol was basically a massive gimme for the former soviet socialist republics, ignored china and india, and is currently *being* ignored by the EU. Sounds like a great program, let’s get onboard.Sounds good, and again would be done under a cap-and-trade / carbon tax system.Reduced deforestation? In the US? Where we have more forests now than at any point in the previous century? If you want to stop deforestation in the developing world, you’re going to have to give them options to get them out of inefficient subsistence farming – so promote industrialization and modernize their agriculture.25% of the worlds carbon emissions, maybe, but ~33% of the world’s GDP – sounds pretty fucking good to me.

  2. Anonymous

    Okay, nice talking points. Too bad the economics behind them don’t make any sense.

    Lighter car frames might make sense, but a bunch of heavy, noxious batteries do not. “Hydrogen” power is a copout – hydrogen is not a source of energy, it is a means of storing energy. And not a particularly efficient one at that.

    Think about why “alternative energy” is so expensive – because it is, again, less efficient. Government subsidies would just be distorting the market and displacing the pollution – for example, into the extremely environmentally unfriendly production of photovoltaic cells or batteries. Anything that actually used less energy would de facto pay for itself, so subsidies ought to be unnecessary for the most part. Carbon taxes may actually be worthwhile, but that is not quite the same thing as a subsidy.

    The Kyoto Protocol was basically a massive gimme for the former soviet socialist republics, ignored china and india, and is currently *being* ignored by the EU. Sounds like a great program, let’s get onboard.

    Sounds good, and again would be done under a cap-and-trade / carbon tax system.

    Reduced deforestation? In the US? Where we have more forests now than at any point in the previous century? If you want to stop deforestation in the developing world, you’re going to have to give them options to get them out of inefficient subsistence farming – so promote industrialization and modernize their agriculture.

    25% of the worlds carbon emissions, maybe, but ~33% of the world’s GDP – sounds pretty fucking good to me.

  3. Anonymous

    Big Picture?1) Lighter car frames composed of metal alloys and advanced polymer composites (which are equivalent to the cost of a steel frame) to reduce physical drag and increase efficiency while still maintaining safety (6-12 times as much crash energy/kilogram as steel.) This would also catalyze the development of fuel cell powered cars as you would need less hydrogen energy to power a lighter vehicle.2)An overall carbon tax and a fuel shift from coal to natural gas/wind/solar energy encouraged by govt. subsidies3) A national cap and trade carbon emission agreement similar to the Kyoto Protocol (which we have not ratified thanks to G dub) and those currently established in California and New England.4) Co2 capture and storage at coal fired power plants5) Reduced deforestationOn a more personal level:1) shut off your lights/heat/computer when not in use2) stop driving your car: use public transit or bikes.3)buy your food locally4)don’t use plastic bags5)pay your bills and read your news online6)use a clothesline instead of a dryer during summer monthsthose are some good places to start. we as Americans emit 25% of the worlds carbon, so 8:57, those goals may not sound hyper realistic, but adjusting to climate change is going to involve lifestyle change, we should start somewhere.

  4. Anonymous

    Big Picture?

    1) Lighter car frames composed of metal alloys and advanced polymer composites (which are equivalent to the cost of a steel frame) to reduce physical drag and increase efficiency while still maintaining safety (6-12 times as much crash energy/kilogram as steel.) This would also catalyze the development of fuel cell powered cars as you would need less hydrogen energy to power a lighter vehicle.

    2)An overall carbon tax and a fuel shift from coal to natural gas/wind/solar energy encouraged by govt. subsidies

    3) A national cap and trade carbon emission agreement similar to the Kyoto Protocol (which we have not ratified thanks to G dub) and those currently established in California and New England.

    4) Co2 capture and storage at coal fired power plants

    5) Reduced deforestation

    On a more personal level:

    1) shut off your lights/heat/computer when not in use

    2) stop driving your car: use public transit or bikes.

    3)buy your food locally

    4)don’t use plastic bags

    5)pay your bills and read your news online

    6)use a clothesline instead of a dryer during summer months

    those are some good places to start. we as Americans emit 25% of the worlds carbon, so 8:57, those goals may not sound hyper realistic, but adjusting to climate change is going to involve lifestyle change, we should start somewhere.

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