Hangman’s Lime open mic poetry night

Leah Campbell ’09 writes:

The Hangman’s Lime, the student-run, undergraduate poetry magazine on campus, is hosting an open-mic reading on Wednesday, December 12 from 8:30 to 10:00 PM. It’s our fifteenth anniversary! Come to the Zelnick Pavilion, lit up as it has been on these winter nights, and you can read, just listen, get copies of last year’s issue and submit your own poems for publication this year.

And join the board! You don’t need prior experience, just a love of poetry and an interest in helping decide what pieces get put in. Email Lee Norton, one of our very fine co-editors, if you want to read next Wednesday, if you want to submit your work, if you like poetry.

Date: December 12
Time: 8:30 – 10:00 PM
Location: Zelnick Pavilion

16 thoughts on “Hangman’s Lime open mic poetry night

  1. Justin

    Hi Leah,Clearly the silly tags—few of which merit being taken seriously—on any of the 14 entries I posted yesterday, were taken far too seriously.Anyone judging an event by the silly tag at the bottom of an entry is clearly misleading him or herself. That’s why the event descriptions are posted, front and center. Hell, “expressions of existentialist angst” certainly aren’t what I’d expect from your event after reading your summary. And I believe that Wesleyan students are intelligent enough to understand that the tag was simply a playful—and certainly not serious—stereotype, certainly not suited to a production as organized and serious as yours.I like to think most people would see the ridiculous stereotype embodied in the tag, compare it to the stated aims of your event, and find the contradiction both comical and, well, ridiculous… and hence maybe a bit funny. I didn’t think anyone could look at something as ridiculous as “expressions of existentialist angst” and think it somehow summed up your event. I didn’t think anyone would take it as an insult. But clearly I was mistaken in those assumptions.I will remove the offending tag because, ultimately, it is your event, and I believe you should have control over how it is portrayed. We here at Wesleying strive to serve our fellow students. And I’m doing you no service by letting such a trivial antagonism persist.Please accept my apologies for unintentionally antagonizing you, and, in your view, giving the impression that the open mic poetry night is any less serious than I’m sure it will be. I wish you luck with the event.

  2. Justin

    Hi Leah,

    Clearly the silly tags—few of which merit being taken seriously—on any of the 14 entries I posted yesterday, were taken far too seriously.

    Anyone judging an event by the silly tag at the bottom of an entry is clearly misleading him or herself. That’s why the event descriptions are posted, front and center. Hell, “expressions of existentialist angst” certainly aren’t what I’d expect from your event after reading your summary. And I believe that Wesleyan students are intelligent enough to understand that the tag was simply a playful—and certainly not serious—stereotype, certainly not suited to a production as organized and serious as yours.

    I like to think most people would see the ridiculous stereotype embodied in the tag, compare it to the stated aims of your event, and find the contradiction both comical and, well, ridiculous… and hence maybe a bit funny. I didn’t think anyone could look at something as ridiculous as “expressions of existentialist angst” and think it somehow summed up your event. I didn’t think anyone would take it as an insult. But clearly I was mistaken in those assumptions.

    I will remove the offending tag because, ultimately, it is your event, and I believe you should have control over how it is portrayed. We here at Wesleying strive to serve our fellow students. And I’m doing you no service by letting such a trivial antagonism persist.

    Please accept my apologies for unintentionally antagonizing you, and, in your view, giving the impression that the open mic poetry night is any less serious than I’m sure it will be. I wish you luck with the event.

  3. Leah

    Justin, First, thank you for posting my announcement. Without your work, our event wouldn’t get the kind of exposure Wesleying can give it. Therefore, you’re a part of making poetry more visible on campus, one of the Lime’s explicit aims.But I have to agree with Kate here. Please don’t riff on the groups you post, because while you do advance our work, you also simultaneously take us a few steps backward. Calling our work “expressions of existentialist angst” bridles us with a notion of foolish youth going through an adolescent “who am I?” phase before we mature to the kind of grip on life you apparently have. I get the joke. It’s not yours to make. We are poets who are serious (and sometimes not serious, but that’s our call) about our artwork.Please be real. This is not about “efficient archiving”. As for basing your tags on “phrases or words that the students submitting the events wrote themselves” – I think you’ll find that in my announcement I in no way trivialized the magazine that I and others work so hard to put out every year.So let us add the spice. No need to help us there. Plenty of people will find the reading perfectly interesting without your comments. To that end, Kate doesn’t need to join Wesleying in order to influence it. Those of us who care about doing something on campus will write our posts, and your job is to make them visible. We are indeed already influencing how Wesleying looks, because we’re influencing how Wesleyan looks.Please do come to our reading next Wednesday. I think you’ll find it an expression of something quite different than you imagined.Leah

  4. Leah

    Justin,

    First, thank you for posting my announcement. Without your work, our event wouldn’t get the kind of exposure Wesleying can give it. Therefore, you’re a part of making poetry more visible on campus, one of the Lime’s explicit aims.

    But I have to agree with Kate here. Please don’t riff on the groups you post, because while you do advance our work, you also simultaneously take us a few steps backward. Calling our work “expressions of existentialist angst” bridles us with a notion of foolish youth going through an adolescent “who am I?” phase before we mature to the kind of grip on life you apparently have. I get the joke. It’s not yours to make. We are poets who are serious (and sometimes not serious, but that’s our call) about our artwork.

    Please be real. This is not about “efficient archiving”. As for basing your tags on “phrases or words that the students submitting the events wrote themselves” – I think you’ll find that in my announcement I in no way trivialized the magazine that I and others work so hard to put out every year.

    So let us add the spice. No need to help us there. Plenty of people will find the reading perfectly interesting without your comments. To that end, Kate doesn’t need to join Wesleying in order to influence it. Those of us who care about doing something on campus will write our posts, and your job is to make them visible. We are indeed already influencing how Wesleying looks, because we’re influencing how Wesleyan looks.

    Please do come to our reading next Wednesday. I think you’ll find it an expression of something quite different than you imagined.

    Leah

  5. ploppy ploopersmith '08

    I gotta say I agree with Kate. Yeah, you could say it’s funny to call poetry “angsty,” but it’s just mean to make fun of something that people have put a lot of effort into, creative or otherwise. It demeans the event for no good reason.

  6. ploppy ploopersmith '08

    I gotta say I agree with Kate. Yeah, you could say it’s funny to call poetry “angsty,” but it’s just mean to make fun of something that people have put a lot of effort into, creative or otherwise. It demeans the event for no good reason.

  7. ploppy ploopersmith '08

    I gotta say I agree with Kate. Yeah, you could say it’s funny to call poetry “angsty,” but it’s just mean to make fun of something that people have put a lot of effort into, creative or otherwise. It demeans the event for no good reason.

  8. ploppy ploopersmith '08

    I gotta say I agree with Kate. Yeah, you could say it’s funny to call poetry “angsty,” but it’s just mean to make fun of something that people have put a lot of effort into, creative or otherwise. It demeans the event for no good reason.

  9. Samuel

    dear justin,you are full of shit. spice my ass. you wouldn’t know spice if it crawled up your nose and played hackysack with your little brain. why not leave humor to the comedians and the dick sucking, etc. to idiots like you?sam

  10. Samuel

    dear justin,

    you are full of shit. spice my ass. you wouldn’t know spice if it crawled up your nose and played hackysack with your little brain. why not leave humor to the comedians and the dick sucking, etc. to idiots like you?

    sam

  11. Justin

    Hi Kate,As for archival purposes, I think you’ll find that the majority of recent posts on this blog don’t even have tags, mine excepted. Clearly, efficient archiving is not something with which Wesleying bloggers are typically concerned.As for the “adolescent name-calling,” it does seem that pretty much everything that might be construed as non-politically correct gets slammed on this blog. That said, I give you major props for not doing it anonymously, like so many others.I am, however, going to have to disagree with your call to erase the tags; as you can see, pretty much everything I’ve posted today has some jocular tag attached to it. They’re not meant to “degrade” the events; just maybe add a little spice to the regularly ho-hum event postings.”Demeaning”? If you look at many of the tags, you’ll see that they are actually based on phrases or words that the students submitting the events wrote themselves. Perhaps, in those cases, you should consult with the authors of the event summaries. I have provided the authors’ names for all events right in the entries.If you’d like to influence the way events are portrayed on Wesleying, by all means, we’d love to have you on board. Just send us an email at wesleying@gmail.com.

  12. Justin

    Hi Kate,

    As for archival purposes, I think you’ll find that the majority of recent posts on this blog don’t even have tags, mine excepted. Clearly, efficient archiving is not something with which Wesleying bloggers are typically concerned.

    As for the “adolescent name-calling,” it does seem that pretty much everything that might be construed as non-politically correct gets slammed on this blog. That said, I give you major props for not doing it anonymously, like so many others.

    I am, however, going to have to disagree with your call to erase the tags; as you can see, pretty much everything I’ve posted today has some jocular tag attached to it. They’re not meant to “degrade” the events; just maybe add a little spice to the regularly ho-hum event postings.

    “Demeaning”? If you look at many of the tags, you’ll see that they are actually based on phrases or words that the students submitting the events wrote themselves. Perhaps, in those cases, you should consult with the authors of the event summaries. I have provided the authors’ names for all events right in the entries.

    If you’d like to influence the way events are portrayed on Wesleying, by all means, we’d love to have you on board. Just send us an email at wesleying@gmail.com.

  13. Kate G

    I am offended that this reading announcement was tagged “expressions of existentialist angst.” There is no reason to degrade this event, especially when its goals are to at once expand the writing community and make that community accessible to the student body at large. A noble goal, I would say, as poetry is a legitimate artistic, intellectual, and creative pursuit. I will go even further and say that I find many of the tags added by Justin are demeaning to the events and the causes they support as well as unhelpful for archiving. Tagging a post about raising funds for Darfur “foregoing shoelaces” and a post about CEDAW (Treaty for the Rights of Women) and I-VAWA (International Violence Against Women Act) “rights for womenfolk” is insensitive.There is huge power in naming, and I feel that in these instances (as well as many others) Wesleying is abusing that power. Please erase and apologize for this adolescent name-calling.

  14. Kate G

    I am offended that this reading announcement was tagged “expressions of existentialist angst.” There is no reason to degrade this event, especially when its goals are to at once expand the writing community and make that community accessible to the student body at large. A noble goal, I would say, as poetry is a legitimate artistic, intellectual, and creative pursuit.

    I will go even further and say that I find many of the tags added by Justin are demeaning to the events and the causes they support as well as unhelpful for archiving. Tagging a post about raising funds for Darfur “foregoing shoelaces” and a post about CEDAW (Treaty for the Rights of Women) and I-VAWA (International Violence Against Women Act) “rights for womenfolk” is insensitive.

    There is huge power in naming, and I feel that in these instances (as well as many others) Wesleying is abusing that power.

    Please erase and apologize for this adolescent name-calling.

Comments are closed.