Education Inequality: America’s Greatest Injustice

Tuesday Night, we will be hosting a panel of educational experts to discuss educational inequality as it operates in America. Education inequity is our nation’s greatest injustice, affecting primarily children from low-income communities and children of color.

Please consider this your invitation to learn more about this pressing issue.

When: Tuesday Night, December 11th
Time: 7:30pm
Place: 108 Usdan

This event is sponsored by: Office of Community Service, Teach For America, Invisible Men, Nosotras, Woodrow Wilson Tutoring and North End Mentors

In America today, 9-year-olds growing up in low-income communities are already three grade levels behind their peers in higher-income communities. By the time they reach high school, only 50% of children in low-income communities will graduate. Those children who graduate will do so at an eighth grade level.*

Educational inequity is our nation’s greatest injustice – and you have the power to change this. Come talk about educational inequity with leaders in education reform.

The panelists will discuss the current context of educational inequality, factors contributing to the inequality, and some of today’s solutions to the problem. In addition to the panel, a table exhibition of Wesleyan education groups will present the work students on campus are currently doing to work for educational equity. Come learn how you can make a difference in the lives of Connecticut youth and fight our nation’s most pressing issue.

Panelists that evening include:

Debon Lewis
, Achievement First

-Principal of Achievement First in Hartford, CT Achievement First is a non-profit charter school management organization that operates a growing network of high-performing, K-12 public schools in Connecticut and New York. DR.

Daniel Long, Professor Assistant Professor of Sociology; PHD University of Wisconsin Madison

-Professor Long is interested in the sociology of education and is teaching a class this spring called Education and Inequality.

John Motely, Motely Beup

-John Motely, a partner in Motley Beup, a Hartford-based capacity building consultant to non-profits, was formerly Executive Director of External Affairs of the Hartford Public Schools.

Mandi Jackson, Professor Assistant Professor of African American Studies; PHD Yale University

-Professor Jackson’s studies focus on the spatial and cultural roots of inequality, focusing specifically on urban inequality.

Lee Wynn, Woodrow Wilson Middle School

-Lee is a veteran teacher at Woodrow Wilson Middle School. She has been teaching for 25 years. She serves as the on site administrator for the Woodrow Wilson-Wesleyan tutoring partnership with Wesleyan.

6 thoughts on “Education Inequality: America’s Greatest Injustice

  1. Anonymous

    Yeah, because I know so many poor adults who can’t read and write at the 8th grade level.Oh wait, I actually do.It’s all related. If you give the kids a chance at a decent education, maybe we can stem the cycle. Think about it.

  2. Anonymous

    Yeah, because I know so many poor adults who can’t read and write at the 8th grade level.

    Oh wait, I actually do.

    It’s all related. If you give the kids a chance at a decent education, maybe we can stem the cycle.

    Think about it.

  3. Anonymous

    I hate the way TFA says that educational inequality is the ‘greatest’ injustice in this nation. i’m sure hunger and poverty and homelessness are greater injustices than not being able to read/write at an 8th grade level

  4. Anonymous

    I hate the way TFA says that educational inequality is the ‘greatest’ injustice in this nation. i’m sure hunger and poverty and homelessness are greater injustices than not being able to read/write at an 8th grade level

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