In pursuit of the elusive A+

So I’ve heard a lot of debate about A+s at Wesleyan, from people denying its very existence to those contending that they totally know a guy who pulled, like, a 4.1, dude!

Once and for all:

A+s exist.
They are (!!) worth more than As.
Therefore, it is possible to get more than a 4.0 GPA. (See edits)

1. A+s exist.
End of debate. They are, undoubtedly, extremely difficult to get, and some professors don’t give them at all or use different standards for assigning them. For example, this semester I took a science class where the professor technically gave A+s, but only if you got a 100 in the class. Needless to say, no one got an A+.

2. They are worth more than As. Sort of.
The CRC provides us with this handy chart:

Letter Grade Numeric Grade GPA Equivalent
(4-pt. scale)
A+ 98.3 4.0
A 95 4.0
A- 91.7 3.7
B+ 88.3 3.3
B 85 3.0
B- 81.7 2.7
C+ 78.3 2.3
C 75 2.0
C- 71.7 1.7
D+ 68.3 1.3
D 65 1.0
D- 61.7 .7
E+ 58.3 0
E 55 0
E- 51.7 0
F 45 0

An A+ is supposedly a 4.0…But wait! An anonymous commenter writes:

“an a+ is a 98.3. (wesleyan gpa – 55)/4 = real gpa. the highest possible gpa (all a+) is a 4.3.”

Since your AltGPA is calculated from your WesGPA, this makes sense.

Tangent time– Did you know you could get an E at Wesleyan?!?! I didn’t! It’s true– The registrar provides the following guide:

A – Excellent – 95%
B – Good – 85%
C – Fair – 75%
D – Unsatisfactory pass – 65%
E -Failure – 55%
F – Bad failure – 45%


(“Bad failure”…Ouch)

An interesting note is that before the class of 2001, an A+ was worth 98.3 while an A was only worth 95 WesGPA points (I like to refer to them as utils, because they don’t really correspond to anything) with no numerical value assigned for4.0. Since your AltGPA was directly converted to the WesGPA, yes, it was possible to get higher than a 4.0. This policy was supposedly changed for the class of 2001 and above. Quoth the CRC:

After the 1999-2000 academic year, the Registrar’s Office converted GPAs to a 4.0 scale. Please refer to one of the two tables below depending on your class year. While not precise, this form does offer an accurate representation of your GPA conversion.

Except that it didn’t?

3. It is possible to have higher than a 4.0. If someone tells you they know a friend who knows a friend who studied all the time and pulled a >4.0 GPA, slap them upside the head for me. Unless there is some kind of weird loophole, in which case please do me a favor and hook me up.

Edit: Okay, I just got an e-mail from a friend whom I love and trust:

it is actually possible to have more than a 4.0. i certainly don’t have one now, but my first semester here i had a 4.09 with two As and two A+s. perhaps they have changed things since then.

And then a few minutes later:

i take it back. 4.18. what is going on with the math here?

I have no idea.

Edit 2: I stand corrected! Though the CRC’s chart makes me wonder if this is a bug with the Academic History page. What gives?

24 thoughts on “In pursuit of the elusive A+

  1. Anonymous

    Word of advice: employers don’t look at your GPA. Unless, of course, you put it right in front of them, but even then they don’t really care. So if you’re working really hard to have a high GPA for future employers, there are way better ways to spend your time.

  2. Anonymous

    Word of advice: employers don’t look at your GPA. Unless, of course, you put it right in front of them, but even then they don’t really care. So if you’re working really hard to have a high GPA for future employers, there are way better ways to spend your time.

  3. Anonymous

    Xue,I think you are looking at the CRC chart the wrong way. the ‘gpa equivalent’ column is NOT an alternate way to calculate your wesleyan/altgpa – it is a tool for comparing your wesgpa with a gpa that might be assigned at another school. So, if your wesgpa is an 88.3 and your friend at Brown has a 3.3, you guys are even in the eyes of employers and grad schools. If your wesgpa is a 98.3 (altgpa of 4.3), the equivalent at ohio state would be a 4.0, because ohio state does not give out A+’s. (i don’t know if that’s true, i was just using an example of another school)

  4. Anonymous

    Xue,
    I think you are looking at the CRC chart the wrong way. the ‘gpa equivalent’ column is NOT an alternate way to calculate your wesleyan/altgpa – it is a tool for comparing your wesgpa with a gpa that might be assigned at another school. So, if your wesgpa is an 88.3 and your friend at Brown has a 3.3, you guys are even in the eyes of employers and grad schools. If your wesgpa is a 98.3 (altgpa of 4.3), the equivalent at ohio state would be a 4.0, because ohio state does not give out A+’s. (i don’t know if that’s true, i was just using an example of another school)

  5. Justin

    I’m still missing one grade, on both my Academic History page, as well as the Major Requirements page.

  6. Justin

    I’m still missing one grade, on both my Academic History page, as well as the Major Requirements page.

  7. Anonymous

    an a+ is a 98.3. (wesleyan gpa – 55)/4 = real gpa. the highest possible gpa (all a+) is a 4.3.

  8. Anonymous

    an a+ is a 98.3. (wesleyan gpa – 55)/4 = real gpa. the highest possible gpa (all a+) is a 4.3.

  9. Anonymous

    Okay, I certainly don’t have one, but I understand how it’s possible: Wesleyan GPA is calculated using 98.3, 95, 91.7, etc. THEN, it is converted to a 4.0 scale using a simple equation (I don’t remember it now). Your GPA is not initially figured out using a 4.0 scale, and therefore an A+ is counted as more than an A.

  10. Anonymous

    Okay, I certainly don’t have one, but I understand how it’s possible:

    Wesleyan GPA is calculated using 98.3, 95, 91.7, etc. THEN, it is converted to a 4.0 scale using a simple equation (I don’t remember it now). Your GPA is not initially figured out using a 4.0 scale, and therefore an A+ is counted as more than an A.

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