38 thoughts on “This Just In: the cutest picture of Bill and Hillary ever.

  1. Anonymous

    I suggest you get comfortable in the kitchen.Quite comfortable in the kitchen, thanks; naked or clothed!

  2. Anonymous

    I suggest you get comfortable in the kitchen.

    Quite comfortable in the kitchen, thanks; naked or clothed!

  3. Anonymous

    I didn’t mean showing him up politically, i meant literally tearing his balls off. And I am quite comfortable in the kitchen. After all, it’s my girlfriend that has to cook in the nude.

  4. Anonymous

    I didn’t mean showing him up politically, i meant literally tearing his balls off.

    And I am quite comfortable in the kitchen. After all, it’s my girlfriend that has to cook in the nude.

  5. Xiaoxi

    emasculating Bill? into the testicle lock box? FYI: We’re not in the 50s anymore!say what you will about Hillary’s policies, ideas, experience, but let me assure you, showing that you’re threatened by a powerful woman is utterly irrelevant. I suggest you get comfortable in the kitchen.

  6. Xiaoxi

    emasculating Bill? into the testicle lock box?
    FYI: We’re not in the 50s anymore!

    say what you will about Hillary’s policies, ideas, experience, but let me assure you, showing that you’re threatened by a powerful woman is utterly irrelevant.

    I suggest you get comfortable in the kitchen.

  7. noa

    Justin – I also mistook those for your words, after the first paragraphs. Maybe it was the line breaks.

  8. noa

    Justin – I also mistook those for your words, after the first paragraphs. Maybe it was the line breaks.

  9. Justin

    With respect, Anonymous @ 1:30, I didn’t “say” anything.Joel Garreau of the Washington Post wrote something about the photo, and I found it interesting. The words and beliefs are his. I would caution you against making assumptions about things that I’d “say” or “believe” based on an article published in the WaPo’s Arts section.I would also caution you against assuming that I “haven’t been paying attention.” :-P

  10. Justin

    With respect, Anonymous @ 1:30, I didn’t “say” anything.

    Joel Garreau of the Washington Post wrote something about the photo, and I found it interesting. The words and beliefs are his. I would caution you against making assumptions about things that I’d “say” or “believe” based on an article published in the WaPo’s Arts section.

    I would also caution you against assuming that I “haven’t been paying attention.” :-P

  11. Anonymous

    Justin: what you say is true, but if you still believe that photojournalism isn’t nearly always staged, then you haven’t been paying attention. Unless you want to openly question every photo you see – and feel free to do so, though it takes a lot of work – what matters most is the image itself. I certainly won’t go so far as to say that the method of production is irrelevant, but unless the photo is actively doctored or otherwise fraudulent then it’s pretty much fair game. In fact, I find it downright strange that the Post bothered to mention the circumstances surrounding the shot.

  12. Anonymous

    Justin: what you say is true, but if you still believe that photojournalism isn’t nearly always staged, then you haven’t been paying attention.

    Unless you want to openly question every photo you see – and feel free to do so, though it takes a lot of work – what matters most is the image itself. I certainly won’t go so far as to say that the method of production is irrelevant, but unless the photo is actively doctored or otherwise fraudulent then it’s pretty much fair game. In fact, I find it downright strange that the Post bothered to mention the circumstances surrounding the shot.

  13. Justin

    From the Washington Post:Take, for example, his 1992 photo of Hillary and Bill Clinton. What you see is an awww-inspiring photo of two people who seem very much in love. The viewer, however, might be happier appreciating the image and not reading the wall caption. For there it is revealed that Benson set it up. “Spotting the hammock in the garden of the Governor’s Mansion,” it reads, “he persuaded Clinton and his wife Hillary to climb in.”He set it up and they were in on the setup. The whole thing is not so much the capture of a spontaneous, character-revealing moment as an elaborate exercise in image enhancement.You ask yourself, is the emotion presented in the photo all hokum? Is it a campaign ad flying under the colors of a news photograph with the corrupt complicity of and at the instigation of the photographer? Or is it only partial hokum, an act for the camera by two people who are certainly professional politicians but who also actually do have feelings for each other and who have had many moments like this?Either way, you liked the picture more when you thought of it as capturing the unguarded emotions of people in a complex relationship, before you started thinking of it as two complex people in a complex relationship engaging in a sales job.

  14. Justin

    From the Washington Post:

    Take, for example, his 1992 photo of Hillary and Bill Clinton. What you see is an awww-inspiring photo of two people who seem very much in love. The viewer, however, might be happier appreciating the image and not reading the wall caption. For there it is revealed that Benson set it up. “Spotting the hammock in the garden of the Governor’s Mansion,” it reads, “he persuaded Clinton and his wife Hillary to climb in.”

    He set it up and they were in on the setup. The whole thing is not so much the capture of a spontaneous, character-revealing moment as an elaborate exercise in image enhancement.

    You ask yourself, is the emotion presented in the photo all hokum? Is it a campaign ad flying under the colors of a news photograph with the corrupt complicity of and at the instigation of the photographer? Or is it only partial hokum, an act for the camera by two people who are certainly professional politicians but who also actually do have feelings for each other and who have had many moments like this?

    Either way, you liked the picture more when you thought of it as capturing the unguarded emotions of people in a complex relationship, before you started thinking of it as two complex people in a complex relationship engaging in a sales job.

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