In the Middle: Army eyes M-town for new home

Unless you’ve driven down Route 3 and seen the little sign with the little letters announcing its presence, you’ve probably never known that the Army’s 1205th Transportation Railway Operating Battalion has its base in Middletown. Quite apart from this installation, the U.S. Army also wants to make Middletown the home of a new centralized training base to take the place of various bases that are closing, or have closed, across Connecticut.

Due to its centralized location and available tracts of land, the city apparently makes a terrific spot. But the local media makes it seem as if it may be otherwise. Says the Hartford Courant:

A proposal to build a 200,000-square-foot Army training center on 40 acres of open space in Middletown is prompting concern among some residents.

Well, that’s natural. Any time something that big wants to plop itself down on a tract of city land, someone’s going to have an opinion. And in this case, plenty of people do. From the Army to the mayor, rural residents to environmentalists, local business interests, and everyone in between, the Army base is arousing passions across the city.

According to Ed McKeon of Caterwauled (relevant entries here and here), the Army is looking at a wooded area in the south of the city, along Saybrook Road, known as Maromas. The Russell Library has a webpage about Maromas, calling it a “sparsely settled district” on the banks of “the Connecticut River in the southeastern section of Middletown.”

McKeon himself doesn’t seem too pleased with the proposed development:

It would be a convenient way to open the Saybrook Road corridor to commercial development. The Middlesex Chamber of Commerce is apparently very interested in this possibility, and so, is supporting the idea of the Army Training Base. But take a ride to Groton, and examine the kind of commercial interests which spring up around such a site – bars, liquor stores, convenience stores, gas stations, chain restaurants, dollar stores. Is this the kind of development Middletown wants? And is Saybrook Road where we want it to exist?

And Middletown residents are already debating the Army’s plans on the online discussion boards. Even the New York Times has gotten in on the action, chronicling the base development from the viewpoint of residents of the Maromas section of town:

A few months ago, when Wesleyan University announced that it would create 10 scholarships to encourage military veterans to study here, school officials and students talked of welcoming them with open arms.

A few weeks later, when the Army Corps of Engineers began inspecting land a few miles away from the Wesleyan campus to build a new, 200,000-square-foot regional training center for reservists, the spirit was not so warm.

The Army’s plans call for the new base in Middletown, aiming to “enhance military value, improve homeland defense capability, greatly improve training and deployment capability, create significant efficiencies and cost savings, and [further] the Army’s Force Structure Plans and Army transformational objectives.” And according to the federal Base Closure and Realignment Commission, Middletown will be the host of the base, whether it likes it or not. So the only question is, where do we put it?

A lot of issues exist here, not least the character of Middletown’s rural sections and the environmental concerns posed by wiping out a large section of the city’s remaining forests. And as McKeon points out, the economic development that the base would bring might not be as beneficial as the local business community thinks. But as Major Giuliano was quoted in the Times, “You don’t want to say no to the Army.”

As part-time residents of Middletown, what do you think about the military’s plans to locate the base here? What power does the Planning and Zoning Committee, on which Matt Lesser ’09 sits, have in influencing the Army? And is it even the place of Wesleyan to have a voice in this proposed development?

EDIT: Right of Middle also mentions the base development and points out that there is a meeting at City Hall tomorrow (Monday, January 14) at 5:00 PM to discuss the Army’s plans. If you’re interested and on campus, you may want to check it out.

Photo by Master Sgt. Michael L. Lachman; courtesy of the U.S. Army.

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46 thoughts on “In the Middle: Army eyes M-town for new home

  1. steadyjohn

    The postponed meeting re the proposed Army site has tentatively been rescheduled for Thursday Jan 24, 5 PM, in council chambers. Report here.

  2. steadyjohn

    The postponed meeting re the proposed Army site has tentatively been rescheduled for Thursday Jan 24, 5 PM, in council chambers. Report here.

  3. steadyjohn

    The postponed meeting re the proposed Army site has tentatively been rescheduled for Thursday Jan 24, 5 PM, in council chambers. Report here.

  4. direland

    Yes Justin, that is a lot of green. Zoom out some more, and you’ll see even more green. In fact, you’ll notice that there’s plenty of green. There’s far more green than there is any other color. If you want to put it someplace not green, you’ll have to put it some place blue, which is water, or some place grey, which is already developed land. And you know how local residents feel about putting new buildings there! http://caterwauled.blogspot.com/2008/01/how-bout-we-smash-few-antiques-for-sake.htmlEd and his fellow activists are not worried about the trees leaving, they are worried about the army base coming. And all the development, parking lots, and congestion that would follow. So if they’re not happy with putting it in some underdeveloped green part of the map, they’ll be twice as unhappy if you suggest putting it on top of some grey part of the map that already has plenty of that sort of thing, thank you very much.The Army has already said they’re willing to work with the town to pick where the development would best benefit Middletown, and what kind of development that would be. But the only suggestions Ed has offered, as far as I know, are Portland, Haddam, Cromwell, or New Britain – in short, not in his backyard.

  5. direland

    Yes Justin, that is a lot of green. Zoom out some more, and you’ll see even more green. In fact, you’ll notice that there’s plenty of green. There’s far more green than there is any other color. If you want to put it someplace not green, you’ll have to put it some place blue, which is water, or some place grey, which is already developed land. And you know how local residents feel about putting new buildings there! http://caterwauled.blogspot.com/2008/01/how-bout-we-smash-few-antiques-for-sake.htmlEd and his fellow activists are not worried about the trees leaving, they are worried about the army base coming. And all the development, parking lots, and congestion that would follow. So if they’re not happy with putting it in some underdeveloped green part of the map, they’ll be twice as unhappy if you suggest putting it on top of some grey part of the map that already has plenty of that sort of thing, thank you very much.The Army has already said they’re willing to work with the town to pick where the development would best benefit Middletown, and what kind of development that would be. But the only suggestions Ed has offered, as far as I know, are Portland, Haddam, Cromwell, or New Britain – in short, not in his backyard.

  6. direland

    Yes Justin, that is a lot of green. Zoom out some more, and you’ll see even more green. In fact, you’ll notice that there’s plenty of green. There’s far more green than there is any other color. If you want to put it someplace not green, you’ll have to put it some place blue, which is water, or some place grey, which is already developed land. And you know how local residents feel about putting new buildings there! http://caterwauled.blogspot.com/2008/01/how-bout-we-smash-few-antiques-for-sake.html

    Ed and his fellow activists are not worried about the trees leaving, they are worried about the army base coming. And all the development, parking lots, and congestion that would follow. So if they’re not happy with putting it in some underdeveloped green part of the map, they’ll be twice as unhappy if you suggest putting it on top of some grey part of the map that already has plenty of that sort of thing, thank you very much.

    The Army has already said they’re willing to work with the town to pick where the development would best benefit Middletown, and what kind of development that would be. But the only suggestions Ed has offered, as far as I know, are Portland, Haddam, Cromwell, or New Britain – in short, not in his backyard.

  7. direland

    Oh, so the army is going to build its base on a bunch of ravines, ledges, and wetlands? No. They’re not building some supermassive skunkworks, they’re building a fairly modest training installation. Obviously it wasn’t all farmland (but I wouldn’t be surprised if the parcel the base is built on was) but it’s equally obvious that Middlesex county is no longer pristine wilderness, so your objections are not so much environmental as they are aesthetic – which is fine, but it’s not exactly moral high ground. This MILITARY (reserve) BASE will not DESTROY OPEN SPACE FOREVER.To answer your points more directly: nope, couldn’t do a drive-by; I’m about three hours north of Middletown and I was worried that this wild, vast wilderness would be inaccessible to my Civic. And I’m clearly not of the school which believes that any development is good – I’m more than a little skeptical of governmental excesses such as the new green initiatives being championed at MHS. National defense, on the other hand, is pretty much textbook public good. That’s the reason why it takes precedence over zoning regulations (remember, those are the things preventing the rebuilding of New Orleans – just like the Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for destroying it, right?). Note, however, that all the bars, liquor stores, and dollar stores – you know, the sorts of places that attract the poor and criminally insane – would still be subject to such regulation. I don’t know how ugly and unlivable they’d be, although my guess is “slightly more liveable than a swamp,” which is the unfortunate yet inevitable tradeoff between preservation and development. You’ve already got a job and a place to live though, so I can understand why you’re not too worried about Army reservists who might need the same things.

  8. direland

    Oh, so the army is going to build its base on a bunch of ravines, ledges, and wetlands? No. They’re not building some supermassive skunkworks, they’re building a fairly modest training installation. Obviously it wasn’t all farmland (but I wouldn’t be surprised if the parcel the base is built on was) but it’s equally obvious that Middlesex county is no longer pristine wilderness, so your objections are not so much environmental as they are aesthetic – which is fine, but it’s not exactly moral high ground. This MILITARY (reserve) BASE will not DESTROY OPEN SPACE FOREVER.To answer your points more directly: nope, couldn’t do a drive-by; I’m about three hours north of Middletown and I was worried that this wild, vast wilderness would be inaccessible to my Civic. And I’m clearly not of the school which believes that any development is good – I’m more than a little skeptical of governmental excesses such as the new green initiatives being championed at MHS. National defense, on the other hand, is pretty much textbook public good. That’s the reason why it takes precedence over zoning regulations (remember, those are the things preventing the rebuilding of New Orleans – just like the Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for destroying it, right?). Note, however, that all the bars, liquor stores, and dollar stores – you know, the sorts of places that attract the poor and criminally insane – would still be subject to such regulation. I don’t know how ugly and unlivable they’d be, although my guess is “slightly more liveable than a swamp,” which is the unfortunate yet inevitable tradeoff between preservation and development. You’ve already got a job and a place to live though, so I can understand why you’re not too worried about Army reservists who might need the same things.

  9. direland

    Oh, so the army is going to build its base on a bunch of ravines, ledges, and wetlands? No. They’re not building some supermassive skunkworks, they’re building a fairly modest training installation. Obviously it wasn’t all farmland (but I wouldn’t be surprised if the parcel the base is built on was) but it’s equally obvious that Middlesex county is no longer pristine wilderness, so your objections are not so much environmental as they are aesthetic – which is fine, but it’s not exactly moral high ground. This MILITARY (reserve) BASE will not DESTROY OPEN SPACE FOREVER.

    To answer your points more directly: nope, couldn’t do a drive-by; I’m about three hours north of Middletown and I was worried that this wild, vast wilderness would be inaccessible to my Civic. And I’m clearly not of the school which believes that any development is good – I’m more than a little skeptical of governmental excesses such as the new green initiatives being championed at MHS. National defense, on the other hand, is pretty much textbook public good. That’s the reason why it takes precedence over zoning regulations (remember, those are the things preventing the rebuilding of New Orleans – just like the Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for destroying it, right?). Note, however, that all the bars, liquor stores, and dollar stores – you know, the sorts of places that attract the poor and criminally insane – would still be subject to such regulation. I don’t know how ugly and unlivable they’d be, although my guess is “slightly more liveable than a swamp,” which is the unfortunate yet inevitable tradeoff between preservation and development. You’ve already got a job and a place to live though, so I can understand why you’re not too worried about Army reservists who might need the same things.

  10. Justin

    Dominic, I agree with you: Middletown could use the development. But as Ed says, the issue here isn’t whether development is good or bad, but rather where the development would best benefit Middletown, and what kind of development would best benefit Middletown.I’ve looked at your maps. Instead of looking at the few industrial developments in the area, why not look at the area? Check out this satellite view courtesy of Google Maps. That’s a lot of green. Big, bushy green. The green that looks like a pretty thick forest. Why rip it all down when there is other, much more developed land in town that could be used instead?Anonymous @ 1:43, I doubt that the decision had anything to do with our class schedule; the federal commission that decides these things assumedly designated Middletown as the new host months, if not years, ago. I can’t speak to the specifics of the timing but somehow I doubt that Wesleyan’s desires have any bearing on the decisions of the Army.And while some people on the discussion boards and blogs have proposed alternatives, I don’t remember seeing anything about official alternative proposals as of yet. Oh, and I agree with your opinion on our role in the discussion! :-)

  11. Justin

    Dominic, I agree with you: Middletown could use the development. But as Ed says, the issue here isn’t whether development is good or bad, but rather where the development would best benefit Middletown, and what kind of development would best benefit Middletown.I’ve looked at your maps. Instead of looking at the few industrial developments in the area, why not look at the area? Check out this satellite view courtesy of Google Maps. That’s a lot of green. Big, bushy green. The green that looks like a pretty thick forest. Why rip it all down when there is other, much more developed land in town that could be used instead?Anonymous @ 1:43, I doubt that the decision had anything to do with our class schedule; the federal commission that decides these things assumedly designated Middletown as the new host months, if not years, ago. I can’t speak to the specifics of the timing but somehow I doubt that Wesleyan’s desires have any bearing on the decisions of the Army.And while some people on the discussion boards and blogs have proposed alternatives, I don’t remember seeing anything about official alternative proposals as of yet. Oh, and I agree with your opinion on our role in the discussion! :-)

  12. Justin

    Dominic, I agree with you: Middletown could use the development. But as Ed says, the issue here isn’t whether development is good or bad, but rather where the development would best benefit Middletown, and what kind of development would best benefit Middletown.

    I’ve looked at your maps. Instead of looking at the few industrial developments in the area, why not look at the area? Check out this satellite view courtesy of Google Maps. That’s a lot of green. Big, bushy green. The green that looks like a pretty thick forest. Why rip it all down when there is other, much more developed land in town that could be used instead?

    Anonymous @ 1:43, I doubt that the decision had anything to do with our class schedule; the federal commission that decides these things assumedly designated Middletown as the new host months, if not years, ago. I can’t speak to the specifics of the timing but somehow I doubt that Wesleyan’s desires have any bearing on the decisions of the Army.

    And while some people on the discussion boards and blogs have proposed alternatives, I don’t remember seeing anything about official alternative proposals as of yet. Oh, and I agree with your opinion on our role in the discussion! :-)

  13. Anonymous

    If anyone bothers to read the article in the Courant, they’d see that the Army rep says it doesn’t have to be at that site, and that the Army is more than open to discussion, but that the site was OFFERED to them not by the town but the current owner. In otherwords, if people give them a reasonable alternative, it sounds like they would be more than willing to consider it.

  14. Anonymous

    If anyone bothers to read the article in the Courant, they’d see that the Army rep says it doesn’t have to be at that site, and that the Army is more than open to discussion, but that the site was OFFERED to them not by the town but the current owner. In otherwords, if people give them a reasonable alternative, it sounds like they would be more than willing to consider it.

  15. Anonymous

    If anyone bothers to read the article in the Courant, they’d see that the Army rep says it doesn’t have to be at that site, and that the Army is more than open to discussion, but that the site was OFFERED to them not by the town but the current owner. In otherwords, if people give them a reasonable alternative, it sounds like they would be more than willing to consider it.

  16. Ed McKeon

    First, the meeting scheduled for Monday the 14th has been postponed due to the “impending snowstorm.”Direland is wrong on many counts. The open space could not have been all farmland, and Direland would know it if he took the time to get off Google maps and even do a drive-by. There’s lots of ledge, ravines and wetlands. Direland also seems to be of the school which believes that any development, no matter how ill-fitting, is good. Of course, that’s the reason for zoning regulations, and open space legislation. We’d have very ugly, very unlivable towns if it were left to the developers. Finally, what Direland fails to mention is that there are homes adjacent to the proposed development, and good reasons for those residents to have a NIMBY attitude. He’s right about the industrial installations there, but the “wild” acres, outnumber the developed acres by large proportion and he could tell that even on Google maps.

  17. Ed McKeon

    First, the meeting scheduled for Monday the 14th has been postponed due to the “impending snowstorm.”Direland is wrong on many counts. The open space could not have been all farmland, and Direland would know it if he took the time to get off Google maps and even do a drive-by. There’s lots of ledge, ravines and wetlands. Direland also seems to be of the school which believes that any development, no matter how ill-fitting, is good. Of course, that’s the reason for zoning regulations, and open space legislation. We’d have very ugly, very unlivable towns if it were left to the developers. Finally, what Direland fails to mention is that there are homes adjacent to the proposed development, and good reasons for those residents to have a NIMBY attitude. He’s right about the industrial installations there, but the “wild” acres, outnumber the developed acres by large proportion and he could tell that even on Google maps.

  18. Ed McKeon

    First, the meeting scheduled for Monday the 14th has been postponed due to the “impending snowstorm.”

    Direland is wrong on many counts. The open space could not have been all farmland, and Direland would know it if he took the time to get off Google maps and even do a drive-by. There’s lots of ledge, ravines and wetlands. Direland also seems to be of the school which believes that any development, no matter how ill-fitting, is good. Of course, that’s the reason for zoning regulations, and open space legislation. We’d have very ugly, very unlivable towns if it were left to the developers. Finally, what Direland fails to mention is that there are homes adjacent to the proposed development, and good reasons for those residents to have a NIMBY attitude. He’s right about the industrial installations there, but the “wild” acres, outnumber the developed acres by large proportion and he could tell that even on Google maps.

  19. johnwesley

    I know this sounds far fetched, but, weren’t they thinking of closing that juvenile detention center next to the psychiatric hospital? They already have a barracks-style facility and its present use as a residence for teen-age boys was a very controversial topic not all that long ago. Mind you, Wesleyan would have to step gingerly since it was our acquisition of Long Lane Farm that required the placement of the facility over there in the first place.

  20. johnwesley

    I know this sounds far fetched, but, weren’t they thinking of closing that juvenile detention center next to the psychiatric hospital? They already have a barracks-style facility and its present use as a residence for teen-age boys was a very controversial topic not all that long ago. Mind you, Wesleyan would have to step gingerly since it was our acquisition of Long Lane Farm that required the placement of the facility over there in the first place.

  21. johnwesley

    I know this sounds far fetched, but, weren’t they thinking of closing that juvenile detention center next to the psychiatric hospital? They already have a barracks-style facility and its present use as a residence for teen-age boys was a very controversial topic not all that long ago. Mind you, Wesleyan would have to step gingerly since it was our acquisition of Long Lane Farm that required the placement of the facility over there in the first place.

  22. direland

    The Main Street area doesn’t have bars, liquor stores, convenience stores, gas stations, chain restaurants, and dollar stores? So what, you’re ignoring all the bars, the three package stores, brooks, didato’s, a bunch of dollar stores… look, do we live in the same Middletown? And we are not talking about the untrammeled wild here, folks. This is… scrub. There’s a United Aircraft factory a little to the north, an electrical substation with high voltage power lines that have been put in through clear-cut swaths, there’s a sewage output a couple miles upriver, and my guess is all that land was probably farmland about a hundred years ago, anyway. Hardly pristine wilderness, and certainly not something that will be forever ruined by the addition of an army training base roughly the same size as a residential subdivision. Check it out with Google’s satellite maps, or, if you so care, a 1934 aerial shot of roughly the same area:http://cslib.cdmhost.com/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=%2Fp4005coll10&CISOPTR=454&DMSCALE=12.5&DMWIDTH=600&DMHEIGHT=600&DMMODE=viewer&DMFULL=0&DMX=622&DMY=322&DMTEXT=&DMTHUMB=1&REC=18&DMROTATE=0&x=259&y=379more maps for the cartographically inclined:sewage disposal pumping station:http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm?lat=41.541867&lon=-72.5545848&scale=24000&zoom=100&type=1&height=498&width=498&icon=0&searchscope=dom&CFID=24674593&CFTOKEN=70028842&scriptfile=http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm&bpid=HIS0203033115%2C2%2C1%2C0&latlontype=DMShigh voltage power lines + electrical substation (gravel pit – bonus!): http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm?lat=41.510484&lon=-72.566186&scale=24000&zoom=100&type=1&icon=0&width=498&height=498&searchscope=dom&CFID=24674593&CFTOKEN=70028842&scriptfile=http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm&latlontype=DMSAww shucks folks, we’d better campaign for a conservation easement, quick! Hooray for knee-jerk NIMBYism.

  23. direland

    The Main Street area doesn’t have bars, liquor stores, convenience stores, gas stations, chain restaurants, and dollar stores? So what, you’re ignoring all the bars, the three package stores, brooks, didato’s, a bunch of dollar stores… look, do we live in the same Middletown? And we are not talking about the untrammeled wild here, folks. This is… scrub. There’s a United Aircraft factory a little to the north, an electrical substation with high voltage power lines that have been put in through clear-cut swaths, there’s a sewage output a couple miles upriver, and my guess is all that land was probably farmland about a hundred years ago, anyway. Hardly pristine wilderness, and certainly not something that will be forever ruined by the addition of an army training base roughly the same size as a residential subdivision. Check it out with Google’s satellite maps, or, if you so care, a 1934 aerial shot of roughly the same area:http://cslib.cdmhost.com/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=%2Fp4005coll10&CISOPTR=454&DMSCALE=12.5&DMWIDTH=600&DMHEIGHT=600&DMMODE=viewer&DMFULL=0&DMX=622&DMY=322&DMTEXT=&DMTHUMB=1&REC=18&DMROTATE=0&x=259&y=379more maps for the cartographically inclined:sewage disposal pumping station:http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm?lat=41.541867&lon=-72.5545848&scale=24000&zoom=100&type=1&height=498&width=498&icon=0&searchscope=dom&CFID=24674593&CFTOKEN=70028842&scriptfile=http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm&bpid=HIS0203033115%2C2%2C1%2C0&latlontype=DMShigh voltage power lines + electrical substation (gravel pit – bonus!): http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm?lat=41.510484&lon=-72.566186&scale=24000&zoom=100&type=1&icon=0&width=498&height=498&searchscope=dom&CFID=24674593&CFTOKEN=70028842&scriptfile=http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm&latlontype=DMSAww shucks folks, we’d better campaign for a conservation easement, quick! Hooray for knee-jerk NIMBYism.

  24. direland

    The Main Street area doesn’t have bars, liquor stores, convenience stores, gas stations, chain restaurants, and dollar stores? So what, you’re ignoring all the bars, the three package stores, brooks, didato’s, a bunch of dollar stores… look, do we live in the same Middletown?

    And we are not talking about the untrammeled wild here, folks. This is… scrub. There’s a United Aircraft factory a little to the north, an electrical substation with high voltage power lines that have been put in through clear-cut swaths, there’s a sewage output a couple miles upriver, and my guess is all that land was probably farmland about a hundred years ago, anyway. Hardly pristine wilderness, and certainly not something that will be forever ruined by the addition of an army training base roughly the same size as a residential subdivision.

    Check it out with Google’s satellite maps, or, if you so care, a 1934 aerial shot of roughly the same area:

    http://cslib.cdmhost.com/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=%2Fp4005coll10&CISOPTR=454&DMSCALE=12.5&DMWIDTH=600&DMHEIGHT=600&DMMODE=viewer&DMFULL=0&DMX=622&DMY=322&DMTEXT=&DMTHUMB=1&REC=18&DMROTATE=0&x=259&y=379

    more maps for the cartographically inclined:

    sewage disposal pumping station:
    http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm?lat=41.541867&lon=-72.5545848&scale=24000&zoom=100&type=1&height=498&width=498&icon=0&searchscope=dom&CFID=24674593&CFTOKEN=70028842&scriptfile=http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm&bpid=HIS0203033115%2C2%2C1%2C0&latlontype=DMS

    high voltage power lines + electrical substation (gravel pit – bonus!): http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm?lat=41.510484&lon=-72.566186&scale=24000&zoom=100&type=1&icon=0&width=498&height=498&searchscope=dom&CFID=24674593&CFTOKEN=70028842&scriptfile=http://mapserver.maptech.com/homepage/index.cfm&latlontype=DMS

    Aww shucks folks, we’d better campaign for a conservation easement, quick! Hooray for knee-jerk NIMBYism.

  25. Anonymous

    I feel like this decision was strategically planned so we wouldn’t be in school. Not that it seems anything will change regarding the army base being in town… but maybe we can influence where it is placed within Middletown?Is any place other than the Maromas being suggested?And, in answer to your question Justin, I believe that the Wesleyan student body should have a voice in the discussion, though not an overbearing one. While we as individuals are only residents of Middletown for a short period of time, the institution and its students will be a presence in the community for the foreseeable future, and will be just as influenced by the decision as we are… which may in the end be somewhat of a negligible influence… but still, we speak for the trees, dr. suess would be proud :)

  26. Anonymous

    I feel like this decision was strategically planned so we wouldn’t be in school. Not that it seems anything will change regarding the army base being in town… but maybe we can influence where it is placed within Middletown?Is any place other than the Maromas being suggested?And, in answer to your question Justin, I believe that the Wesleyan student body should have a voice in the discussion, though not an overbearing one. While we as individuals are only residents of Middletown for a short period of time, the institution and its students will be a presence in the community for the foreseeable future, and will be just as influenced by the decision as we are… which may in the end be somewhat of a negligible influence… but still, we speak for the trees, dr. suess would be proud :)

  27. Anonymous

    I feel like this decision was strategically planned so we wouldn’t be in school. Not that it seems anything will change regarding the army base being in town… but maybe we can influence where it is placed within Middletown?

    Is any place other than the Maromas being suggested?

    And, in answer to your question Justin, I believe that the Wesleyan student body should have a voice in the discussion, though not an overbearing one. While we as individuals are only residents of Middletown for a short period of time, the institution and its students will be a presence in the community for the foreseeable future, and will be just as influenced by the decision as we are… which may in the end be somewhat of a negligible influence… but still, we speak for the trees, dr. suess would be proud :)

  28. Anonymous

    Direland: Not only is that very far from the makeup of businesses in the Main Street area, but Middletown is not currently lacking in development potential. You’re straight-up wrong.11:05: I agree with you on the whole tree saving thing, but I’m not sure how central that issue is to everyone else (in particular, how central it is to the Middletown community).Also, Giuliano is a disgusting slimeball of an excuse for a human being.

  29. Anonymous

    Direland: Not only is that very far from the makeup of businesses in the Main Street area, but Middletown is not currently lacking in development potential. You’re straight-up wrong.11:05: I agree with you on the whole tree saving thing, but I’m not sure how central that issue is to everyone else (in particular, how central it is to the Middletown community).Also, Giuliano is a disgusting slimeball of an excuse for a human being.

  30. Anonymous

    Direland: Not only is that very far from the makeup of businesses in the Main Street area, but Middletown is not currently lacking in development potential. You’re straight-up wrong.

    11:05: I agree with you on the whole tree saving thing, but I’m not sure how central that issue is to everyone else (in particular, how central it is to the Middletown community).

    Also, Giuliano is a disgusting slimeball of an excuse for a human being.

  31. Anonymous

    direland– the point is that this isn’t downtown, it’s currently woods. yes, we have all of those things already. no need to cut down more real trees to build more dollar trees.

  32. Anonymous

    direland– the point is that this isn’t downtown, it’s currently woods. yes, we have all of those things already. no need to cut down more real trees to build more dollar trees.

  33. Anonymous

    direland– the point is that this isn’t downtown, it’s currently woods. yes, we have all of those things already. no need to cut down more real trees to build more dollar trees.

  34. direland

    “bars, liquor stores, convenience stores, gas stations, chain restaurants, dollar stores.”So… the exact same retail mix that composes our downtown? What’s the big deal? Middletown could use the development.

  35. direland

    “bars, liquor stores, convenience stores, gas stations, chain restaurants, dollar stores.”

    So… the exact same retail mix that composes our downtown? What’s the big deal? Middletown could use the development.

  36. Anonymous

    Another great post, Justin. I know lots of people give you crap, but I think you make a really great contribution to Wesleying.

  37. Anonymous

    Another great post, Justin. I know lots of people give you crap, but I think you make a really great contribution to Wesleying.

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