So You Wanna Transfer to Wesleyan?

By and large the primary audience of Wesleying is comprised of current students, alumni, faculty and staff. However, as a once-prospective transfer student myself, I read Wesleying on a daily basis beginning around the time I first considered the possibility that I might transfer to Wesleyan. This post is intended for the handful of readers who find their way to Wesleying while themselves considering whether to transfer here.

Wesleyan’s official information page for prospective transfer students contains a heap of helpful information. Below I will give my take on some of the topics it covers:

  • The Application Process — The important thing to note in this section is that the deadline is March 15.
  • The Essay — In my opinion, the essay required for transfer applicants is awfully short. Last year when I applied, the essay was limited to 600 words, which was barely enough to articulate why I wanted to come to Wesleyan — and being that I transferred from a 2-year school, I didn’t have to tactfully explain why I wanted to leave my current institution.
  • Interviews — Do an interview. Especially if you can do one on campus.

However, there are some things that you will not typically learn about until after you’ve been accepted and plunked down your admission deposit. Below I have tried to address some of the things (good and bad) that I learned after I made my decision:

  • How will your credits transfer? It depends. At Wesleyan, a typical course meets for three hours per week, and counts for one Wesleyan credit. At the school I transferred from, and from many other schools, a typical course that meets for three hours per week counts for three credits. Those three credits will transfer as .75 Wesleyan credits. It is entirely possible to take eight courses in the first year at your original college and only have six credits at the start of your sophomore year at Wesleyan. 32 Wesleyan credits are required for graduation, which assumes four per semester over the course of four years. As I understand it, you must earn a minimum of 16 credits at Wesleyan to be eligible for a degree from Wesleyan.
  • General Education Expectations (info at this link) Though your transfer credits may be devalued, the “Wesleyan credit” value of your transfer courses has no bearing on their acceptance for fulfillment of the General Education Expectations. If you took “Elementary Statistics” at your school for three credits, it will count as .75 credits at Wesleyan, but for the purpose of fulfilling one of your NSM General Education Expectations, it is an even match. Take a look at all of the courses you’ve taken so far, and track down their Wesleyan equivalents in WesMaps. This will help you transfer your credits over to Wesleyan (they may not accept everything) and help you determine what General Education Expectations you’ve already met when you fill out the Transfer Credit Evaluation Form for General Education Equivalency.
  • Transfer Connections — There are a lot of things at Wesleyan (and in college generally) that you have to figure out or deal with on your own, but Wesleyan doesn’t leave transfers high and dry. If you are transferring here you will have the opportunity to be matched up with a transfer connection. You should sign up for this. Transfer connections are students who transferred to Wesleyan from other schools and who understand the transition process. My transfer connection was an invaluable resource, not to mention that it was really nice to have a fellow student available to answer the kinds of questions that one might hesitate to ask of the class dean.
  • Orientation — The official programming is really skewed toward first year students, but that’s because transfers and frosh arrive at the same time, typically a few days in advance of the continuing undergrads. However, the events that were geared toward transfers were worthwhile.

Transferring to Wesleyan was (and you’ll hear this a lot) one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. Knowing what I know now, I would do it all over again, and I offer the information above (especially the disheartening news about credit value on transfer) in the hopes that it helps prospective transfers in their planning.

If you’re thinking about transferring to Wesleyan in the fall, you’d better hop to it. The application deadline is March 15th. Good luck!

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

32 thoughts on “So You Wanna Transfer to Wesleyan?

  1. Anonymous

    dude, i just love this place. transferring was so hard and so shitty but so, so so so SO worth it for me.

  2. Anonymous

    dude, i just love this place. transferring was so hard and so shitty but so, so so so SO worth it for me.

  3. spazeboy

    Anon 7:47It’s nice to know that there are other Connecticut Community College transfers out there. I feel like coming from a community college makes me really value academics at Wesleyan. Sometimes too much even, because for most of my first semester, I really bought the hype about how Wesleyan was so freakin’ awesome…It is pretty awesome, but it’s also just school.

  4. spazeboy

    Anon 7:47

    It’s nice to know that there are other Connecticut Community College transfers out there. I feel like coming from a community college makes me really value academics at Wesleyan. Sometimes too much even, because for most of my first semester, I really bought the hype about how Wesleyan was so freakin’ awesome…

    It is pretty awesome, but it’s also just school.

  5. Anonymous

    I transferred with my Associates in General Studies from Gateway Community College in New Haven – scary? Hell yes (you go from a community college in New Haven to Wes and see if you go through some slight culture shock). Last year was bumpy but it was one of the BEST decisions I’ve ever made.This year is better. Yeah, it’s definitely clannish here, but as someone (well, probably more than one – I just skimmed) said above, almost everyone is ultra friendly, extremely interesting and just overall wonderful.Yeah, and credits get devalued. I remember meeting with my class dean for the first time and she saw all the classes I had taken and wondered why I wasn’t a junior transfer instead of a sophomore transfer – but hey, I was really lucky in that I ended up having 95% of my Gen Eds already done.To those applying – good luck! Hope to see you next year!

  6. Anonymous

    I transferred with my Associates in General Studies from Gateway Community College in New Haven – scary? Hell yes (you go from a community college in New Haven to Wes and see if you go through some slight culture shock). Last year was bumpy but it was one of the BEST decisions I’ve ever made.

    This year is better. Yeah, it’s definitely clannish here, but as someone (well, probably more than one – I just skimmed) said above, almost everyone is ultra friendly, extremely interesting and just overall wonderful.

    Yeah, and credits get devalued. I remember meeting with my class dean for the first time and she saw all the classes I had taken and wondered why I wasn’t a junior transfer instead of a sophomore transfer – but hey, I was really lucky in that I ended up having 95% of my Gen Eds already done.

    To those applying – good luck! Hope to see you next year!

  7. Anonymous

    also a junior transfer – by far, the BEST decision i’ve made in life. the adjustment was not nearly as difficult as i’d imagined. having also transferred from an urban school, i found the community really refreshing. and though there is a distinct social scene in place here, it is also really easy to meet a huge variety of wonderful, interesting, friendly people. just don’t be afraid to join activities and really throw yourself into life here – it’s the only way to go.best of luck.

  8. Anonymous

    also a junior transfer – by far, the BEST decision i’ve made in life. the adjustment was not nearly as difficult as i’d imagined. having also transferred from an urban school, i found the community really refreshing. and though there is a distinct social scene in place here, it is also really easy to meet a huge variety of wonderful, interesting, friendly people. just don’t be afraid to join activities and really throw yourself into life here – it’s the only way to go.

    best of luck.

  9. Anonymous

    anon 1:21 – if you’re positive you won’t (i.e. can’t) stay at your current school, wes isn’t a bad choice. it depends on where you’re coming from. having transferred from an urban school, i was really excited about having a campus community. the downside is that, by junior year, it seems like most people are set in their cliques, which can make it a little hard to infiltrate.this might be the same at most other non-urban schools, but i think it’s more pronounced at wesleyan because it’s very clannish here. still, most people i’ve met have been pretty friendly. just walk into this with open eyes. i definitely had an idyllic picture of wesleyan in my mind, until i came here and realized that – like every place else – there are cliques, gossip, hierarchies, and bullshit. the key, it seems, is not to let yourself get sucked in.good luck with everything!- anon 12:15

  10. Anonymous

    anon 1:21 – if you’re positive you won’t (i.e. can’t) stay at your current school, wes isn’t a bad choice. it depends on where you’re coming from. having transferred from an urban school, i was really excited about having a campus community. the downside is that, by junior year, it seems like most people are set in their cliques, which can make it a little hard to infiltrate.

    this might be the same at most other non-urban schools, but i think it’s more pronounced at wesleyan because it’s very clannish here. still, most people i’ve met have been pretty friendly. just walk into this with open eyes. i definitely had an idyllic picture of wesleyan in my mind, until i came here and realized that – like every place else – there are cliques, gossip, hierarchies, and bullshit. the key, it seems, is not to let yourself get sucked in.

    good luck with everything!

    – anon 12:15

  11. Anonymous

    Don’t come here if you’re not rich and definitely don’t come here if you’re not a socialist. I hated it enough to leave, and now I only pay 20 dollars per unit. It’s so awesome.

  12. Anonymous

    Don’t come here if you’re not rich and definitely don’t come here if you’re not a socialist. I hated it enough to leave, and now I only pay 20 dollars per unit. It’s so awesome.

  13. spazeboy

    Anon 1:21 — If you’re transferring in and you don’t want to find yourself too far behind in credits, the first thing you should do is be a huge pest to find out where you’ll stand. If you’ll be transferring in with a total of at least 14 credits, you can be considered a junior, but you’d be 2 credits behind pace (which is 16 credits for juniors).If you can take a summer class or two to pick up credits before you get to Wes, (and if that’s something you want to do, and can afford) do it. It might make your time here easier.On the other hand, the tuition at Wes is the same whether you’re taking 2 credits or 6 credits per semester (excluding fees for some classes, or the extra tuition required for private music lessons for credit).Good luck with your app!

  14. spazeboy

    Anon 1:21 — If you’re transferring in and you don’t want to find yourself too far behind in credits, the first thing you should do is be a huge pest to find out where you’ll stand. If you’ll be transferring in with a total of at least 14 credits, you can be considered a junior, but you’d be 2 credits behind pace (which is 16 credits for juniors).

    If you can take a summer class or two to pick up credits before you get to Wes, (and if that’s something you want to do, and can afford) do it. It might make your time here easier.

    On the other hand, the tuition at Wes is the same whether you’re taking 2 credits or 6 credits per semester (excluding fees for some classes, or the extra tuition required for private music lessons for credit).

    Good luck with your app!

  15. Anonymous

    haha, you caught me too. thanks for posting this, i can now read wesleying with confidence and purpose. 12:15, that’s a bit discouraging (since i will probably be a junior transfer) but it doesn’t seem it would be any worse than transferring to other schools in one’s 3rd year… right? my current school is just not an option once i make it through this year.

  16. Anonymous

    haha, you caught me too. thanks for posting this, i can now read wesleying with confidence and purpose. 12:15, that’s a bit discouraging (since i will probably be a junior transfer) but it doesn’t seem it would be any worse than transferring to other schools in one’s 3rd year… right? my current school is just not an option once i make it through this year.

  17. Anonymous

    as a junior transfer, not the best decision i’ve ever made. most soph transfers i’ve talked to like it, but if you’re thinking of transferring your junior year, i’d advise you to think twice (i.e. you should really, really want to leave your current school). also, orientation week blows, but defs go to all the transfer events.academics-wise, watch out for oversubscription – my old school was really lax when it came to requirements, so i took a ton of classes in my concentration, meaning i was only allotted five more in my major when i got here. one of my friends had to take some intro courses over because wesleyan wouldn’t accept those credits from his old school.all of that being said, i’m warming up to this place, though it’s extremely fishbowly.

  18. Anonymous

    as a junior transfer, not the best decision i’ve ever made. most soph transfers i’ve talked to like it, but if you’re thinking of transferring your junior year, i’d advise you to think twice (i.e. you should really, really want to leave your current school). also, orientation week blows, but defs go to all the transfer events.

    academics-wise, watch out for oversubscription – my old school was really lax when it came to requirements, so i took a ton of classes in my concentration, meaning i was only allotted five more in my major when i got here. one of my friends had to take some intro courses over because wesleyan wouldn’t accept those credits from his old school.

    all of that being said, i’m warming up to this place, though it’s extremely fishbowly.

  19. Anonymous

    I agree with 5:04 but only because visiting is what sold me on the fact that I’d like it here. No regrets.

  20. Anonymous

    I agree with 5:04 but only because visiting is what sold me on the fact that I’d like it here. No regrets.

  21. spazeboy

    Thanks for your perspective, MBH. As far as I know, things haven’t changed, because transfer credits are still devalued, though I hear that I had a relatively easy go of it mostly due to the fact that my degree from Tunxis Community College was in General Studies (which dovetails nicely into General Education Expectations). I totally understand that the standards are markedly different here than they were at the community college I transferred from, but I don’t necessarily think I should be penalized because I clearly went above and beyond their standards and was doing Wes-level work (I know because the quality of my writing and analysis didn’t magically improve upon my matriculation here).Still, despite my gripes (and I think my friend MBH would agree), what makes Wesleyan great are the people you’ll meet here.

  22. spazeboy

    Thanks for your perspective, MBH. As far as I know, things haven’t changed, because transfer credits are still devalued, though I hear that I had a relatively easy go of it mostly due to the fact that my degree from Tunxis Community College was in General Studies (which dovetails nicely into General Education Expectations). I totally understand that the standards are markedly different here than they were at the community college I transferred from, but I don’t necessarily think I should be penalized because I clearly went above and beyond their standards and was doing Wes-level work (I know because the quality of my writing and analysis didn’t magically improve upon my matriculation here).

    Still, despite my gripes (and I think my friend MBH would agree), what makes Wesleyan great are the people you’ll meet here.

  23. Matt Browner Hamlin

    I was a junior transfer to Wes and the one thing about transfer credits that really, really aggravated me was the need for courses to count towards NSM or other area requirements, there had to be a similar or comparable course at Wes.Here’s an example. I transfered from the Johns Hopkins University, an institution significantly larger than Wes, with about three times as many departments and who knows how many more courses. While at JHU I took a Developmental Cognition course in their Cognitive Sciences department; at JHU it counted towards my natural sciences distribution requirement, which was good for me as a Humanities major.But Wesleyan doesn’t have a Cognitive Science department. Though there was a similar Developmental Cognition course at Wes, it was in the Psychology department and therefore considered a Social Science class for distribution purposes.In effect, I was penalized for going to a larger school with more options for study. That was fairly infuriating. There were a number of other things that should similar Wesleyan-centric takes on academics that just didn’t fit. The fractional course credit is another example of Wesleyan-centric takes on academic value and it just always struck me as absurd that no matter what, time in study at Wesleyan was presumed to be more valuable or comprehensive then time in study at another institution. Maybe some of this stuff has changed in the three years since I graduated, but it is most definitely something to keep your eye on when you’re transferring credits in…

  24. Matt Browner Hamlin

    I was a junior transfer to Wes and the one thing about transfer credits that really, really aggravated me was the need for courses to count towards NSM or other area requirements, there had to be a similar or comparable course at Wes.

    Here’s an example. I transfered from the Johns Hopkins University, an institution significantly larger than Wes, with about three times as many departments and who knows how many more courses. While at JHU I took a Developmental Cognition course in their Cognitive Sciences department; at JHU it counted towards my natural sciences distribution requirement, which was good for me as a Humanities major.

    But Wesleyan doesn’t have a Cognitive Science department. Though there was a similar Developmental Cognition course at Wes, it was in the Psychology department and therefore considered a Social Science class for distribution purposes.

    In effect, I was penalized for going to a larger school with more options for study. That was fairly infuriating. There were a number of other things that should similar Wesleyan-centric takes on academics that just didn’t fit.

    The fractional course credit is another example of Wesleyan-centric takes on academic value and it just always struck me as absurd that no matter what, time in study at Wesleyan was presumed to be more valuable or comprehensive then time in study at another institution.

    Maybe some of this stuff has changed in the three years since I graduated, but it is most definitely something to keep your eye on when you’re transferring credits in…

  25. Anonymous

    You caught me. I don’t go to Wesleyan, but I read Wesleying almost every day. Imagine my shock to open it up and find a post that’s actually relevant to me!

  26. Anonymous

    You caught me. I don’t go to Wesleyan, but I read Wesleying almost every day. Imagine my shock to open it up and find a post that’s actually relevant to me!

Comments are closed.