Is this what happens to business models built around losing business models?

From my junk box:

Dear RUCKUS members,

You know that RUCKUS gives FREE and LEGAL music to college students, right?

We’ve recently asked for your help because we need more members to continue to offer the music for free. Unfortunately, the efforts weren’t good enough, so we’re asking you again to share RUCKUS with your friends.

We pay our bills with ad revenue, so we need more users on the RUCKUS site in order to pay the rent and keep your music flowing for free. It doesn’t matter how you do it—share on Facebook, e-mail your friends, or even streak across your quad—just help us save your music.

Mike, CEO

So, their CEO sends out a plea use their “free service”, complete with a please spam other people’s facebooks because the current spam in your inbox isn’t-quite-enough to save our crappy service button. Wesleyan actually pays them for this bull shit?

Edit: Anonymous Commenter says wesleyan does not pay.

20 thoughts on “Is this what happens to business models built around losing business models?

  1. Anonymous

    As of late January 2008, the Ruckus website stated that 1 million additional members will be required to keep the site open. It is not clear if this development is part of a marketing scheme or indicative of real financial troubles. [6]

  2. Anonymous

    As of late January 2008, the Ruckus website stated that 1 million additional members will be required to keep the site open. It is not clear if this development is part of a marketing scheme or indicative of real financial troubles. [6]

  3. Anonymous

    “Wesleyan actually pays them for this bull shit?”No. It’s free for Wesleyan as well as for individual students. That’s why they’re failing as a business; because they have no real source of income bar advertising, which is obviously insufficient.If Wesleyan and other schools were paying them, they wouldn’t be spamming us.

  4. Anonymous

    “Wesleyan actually pays them for this bull shit?”

    No. It’s free for Wesleyan as well as for individual students. That’s why they’re failing as a business; because they have no real source of income bar advertising, which is obviously insufficient.

    If Wesleyan and other schools were paying them, they wouldn’t be spamming us.

  5. Sam

    Chapter 12 Section 1201 of the DMCA specifically prohibits the removal of DRM under the vast majority of cases. What you’d need to do to remove the Windows Media DRM most definitely is not covered in any of the exceptions the DMCA provides.The reason, by the way, that Ruckus doesn’t work on a Mac is because there is no existing, widely available DRM except for Apple’s Fairplay, which it won’t license.

  6. Sam

    Chapter 12 Section 1201 of the DMCA specifically prohibits the removal of DRM under the vast majority of cases. What you’d need to do to remove the Windows Media DRM most definitely is not covered in any of the exceptions the DMCA provides.

    The reason, by the way, that Ruckus doesn’t work on a Mac is because there is no existing, widely available DRM except for Apple’s Fairplay, which it won’t license.

  7. Jacon

    Dear Disgrunted Mac User,The issue isn’t that Ruckus isn’t designed for a Mac, the issue is that their player/downloader program is shit, that they use DRM-protected music (which, although it is a pain, can be removed – indeed, legally, as long as you don’t then share the music), and that if you do own a Mac, like you and me, you then have to convert the music. Essentially the problem is that there are way easier methods of obtaining free music, which is why Ruckus=fail.Damn I miss Oink.

  8. Jacon

    Dear Disgrunted Mac User,

    The issue isn’t that Ruckus isn’t designed for a Mac, the issue is that their player/downloader program is shit, that they use DRM-protected music (which, although it is a pain, can be removed – indeed, legally, as long as you don’t then share the music), and that if you do own a Mac, like you and me, you then have to convert the music. Essentially the problem is that there are way easier methods of obtaining free music, which is why Ruckus=fail.

    Damn I miss Oink.

  9. Anonymous

    Dear Ruckus,Make yourself usable on a Mac and maybe you’ll get somewhereSincerely,Disgruntled Mac User

  10. Anonymous

    Dear Ruckus,
    Make yourself usable on a Mac and maybe you’ll get somewhere
    Sincerely,
    Disgruntled Mac User

  11. Sam

    Yes, and removing the DRM on Ruckus is illegal, which kind of defeats the whole purpose of using a legal music service. Ruckus also very frequently has broken/cut off or just plain missing tracks. It’s a service that’s been horribly implemented and relies on a failed business model–music with DRM. Every major music label now sells music without DRM, and for a good reason–the only way Ruckus has any chance of surviving at all is to both remove the DRM from their tracks and to let people download music in a format iPods can use.

  12. Sam

    Yes, and removing the DRM on Ruckus is illegal, which kind of defeats the whole purpose of using a legal music service. Ruckus also very frequently has broken/cut off or just plain missing tracks.

    It’s a service that’s been horribly implemented and relies on a failed business model–music with DRM. Every major music label now sells music without DRM, and for a good reason–the only way Ruckus has any chance of surviving at all is to both remove the DRM from their tracks and to let people download music in a format iPods can use.

  13. Anonymous

    Please stop with all the ruckus hate. If you know how to do it, Ruckus will give you thousands of free songs to jam to on your iPod. Ruckus =my bff4ae.

  14. Anonymous

    Please stop with all the ruckus hate. If you know how to do it, Ruckus will give you thousands of free songs to jam to on your iPod.
    Ruckus =my bff4ae.

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