Commemorating Those Who Have Fallen

Here is the list of names of the American soldiers who recently died in action:

Miguel A. Baez, 32, Army Specialist, Feb 05, 2008
John C. Osmolski, 23, Army Sergeant, Feb 05, 2008
Timothy R. Van Orman, 24, Army Sergeant, Feb 05, 2008
Bradley J. Skelton, 40, Army National Guard Sergeant, Feb 06
Luis A. Souffront, 25, Navy Petty Officer 1st Class, Feb 07, 2008
Michael T. Manibog, 31, Army Specialist, Feb 08, 2008
Timothy P. Martin, 27, Army Sergeant, Feb 08, 2008
Jack T. Sweet, 19, Army Private 1st Class, Feb 08, 2008
Jerald A. Whisenhunt, 32, Army Staff Sergeant, Feb 08, 2008
Gary D. Willett, 34, Army Sergeant, Feb 08, 2008
Corey E. Spates, 21, Army Sergeant, Feb 10, 2008
Javares J. Washington, 27, Army Staff Sergeant, Feb 14, 2008
Chad D. Groepper, 21, Army Specialist, Feb 17, 2008
Luke S. Runyan, 21, Army Specialist, Feb 17, 2008
Conrad Alvarez, 22, Army Sergeant, Feb 20, 2008
Albert Bitton, 20, Army Corporal, Feb 20, 2008
Bryant W. Mackey, 30, Army Staff Sergeant, Feb 20, 2008
Jr., Micheal B. Matlock, 21, Army Specialist, Feb 20, 2008
Nathan R. Raudenbush, 25, Army Captain, Feb 20, 2008

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22 thoughts on “Commemorating Those Who Have Fallen

  1. noa

    Most of what everyone has said here is very valid and I don’t disagree – I’ll just say my own feeling. I read these posts with reverence. Personally, I have really appreciated them because I think it’s important to honor those killed, and I DO need to be reminded of the seriousness of our situation. We’re so trained to analyze social processes analytically but can forget that there are humans involved. And those of us who are critical of war can sometimes forget to have compassion for U.S. soldiers and their families – but we need to.3:23 – Posting the deaths on Wesleying is absolutely not about making a point, and it’s absolutely not about making potshots at classmates. Read the first posting here for context: http://wesleying.blogspot.com/2008/01/names-of-fallen.htmlIt was a non-wesleying-contributor who sent the names with the request that they be posted, writing that “Regardless of our feelings on the war, these heroes have no choice in being there and the least we can do is honor them.”So there’s also no distinction between Wesleying posters and “the rest of us.” This wasn’t the initiative of a Wesleying contributor.As far as having no buildup, intro or follow-through, maybe it should. The way I understand it is like – what do you say? What can you say? What is there to add in commentary when you’re giving the names of nineteen people killed in war?Marianna, I feel you. It makes me cry.

  2. noa

    Most of what everyone has said here is very valid and I don’t disagree – I’ll just say my own feeling. I read these posts with reverence. Personally, I have really appreciated them because I think it’s important to honor those killed, and I DO need to be reminded of the seriousness of our situation. We’re so trained to analyze social processes analytically but can forget that there are humans involved. And those of us who are critical of war can sometimes forget to have compassion for U.S. soldiers and their families – but we need to.

    3:23 – Posting the deaths on Wesleying is absolutely not about making a point, and it’s absolutely not about making potshots at classmates. Read the first posting here for context: http://wesleying.blogspot.com/2008/01/names-of-fallen.html

    It was a non-wesleying-contributor who sent the names with the request that they be posted, writing that “Regardless of our feelings on the war, these heroes have no choice in being there and the least we can do is honor them.”

    So there’s also no distinction between Wesleying posters and “the rest of us.” This wasn’t the initiative of a Wesleying contributor.

    As far as having no buildup, intro or follow-through, maybe it should. The way I understand it is like – what do you say? What can you say? What is there to add in commentary when you’re giving the names of nineteen people killed in war?

    Marianna, I feel you. It makes me cry.

  3. Marianna

    I agree with 3:16, and participated in a discussion on the ACB about this that I HOPED would get some attention, since previous posts have been comment blocked. My brother is a Marine, and while he’s still stateside, I don’t want to think about it.

  4. Marianna

    I agree with 3:16, and participated in a discussion on the ACB about this that I HOPED would get some attention, since previous posts have been comment blocked. My brother is a Marine, and while he’s still stateside, I don’t want to think about it.

  5. Anonymous

    i’m all about supporting our veterans, but the way you’re doing it is wrong. it seems to be harnessing their violent deaths to make some kind of point, which, and this I feel vehemently about, you should not do. you can argue what you want about the war either way, but you shouldn’t dishonor the fallen by trying to take cheap political potshots at your fellow classmates or whomever. in fact there’s also an element of self-importance present in you putting this on Wesleying, as if you are somehow closer to the conflict than the wider Wesleyan community. you’re not. you’re a bunch of silly kids, just like the rest of us. i’m not trying to insult anyone and hope that i haven’t (don’t take offense – that’s not my intention), but I do want to register my dismay at this practice. if you want to post things like this, you should at least not bookend it with lighthearted satirical posts. it just comes off poorly.

  6. Anonymous

    i’m all about supporting our veterans, but the way you’re doing it is wrong. it seems to be harnessing their violent deaths to make some kind of point, which, and this I feel vehemently about, you should not do. you can argue what you want about the war either way, but you shouldn’t dishonor the fallen by trying to take cheap political potshots at your fellow classmates or whomever.

    in fact there’s also an element of self-importance present in you putting this on Wesleying, as if you are somehow closer to the conflict than the wider Wesleyan community. you’re not. you’re a bunch of silly kids, just like the rest of us.

    i’m not trying to insult anyone and hope that i haven’t (don’t take offense – that’s not my intention), but I do want to register my dismay at this practice.

    if you want to post things like this, you should at least not bookend it with lighthearted satirical posts. it just comes off poorly.

  7. Anonymous

    you shouldn’t post those names on here. the way you do it is insincere. it has no relevance, no buildup, no introduction or follow-through. you’re talking about people who’ve been killed, blown to little bits or shot through the brains, and you’re sandwiching it in between a stupid post about martians and a selection from the Onion. i support your motives (i think), that is, remembering the fallen, but Wesleying is not the right place for you to do that, at least not without changing the context in which you do so.

  8. Anonymous

    you shouldn’t post those names on here. the way you do it is insincere. it has no relevance, no buildup, no introduction or follow-through. you’re talking about people who’ve been killed, blown to little bits or shot through the brains, and you’re sandwiching it in between a stupid post about martians and a selection from the Onion. i support your motives (i think), that is, remembering the fallen, but Wesleying is not the right place for you to do that, at least not without changing the context in which you do so.

  9. Anonymous

    Who says I’m in the U.S., 1.PM. And I served in the military. Best way to end a war is to win a war. And your “abundantly clear” is pretty ill-informed considering you’ve never been on the ground in Iraq, or any other war zone I’d venture. Besides, you bring our people home now and Iran, Syria and Turkey will turn Iraq into a bloodbath. You want to add that to the killing of the last few years?

  10. Anonymous

    Who says I’m in the U.S., 1.PM. And I served in the military. Best way to end a war is to win a war. And your “abundantly clear” is pretty ill-informed considering you’ve never been on the ground in Iraq, or any other war zone I’d venture. Besides, you bring our people home now and Iran, Syria and Turkey will turn Iraq into a bloodbath. You want to add that to the killing of the last few years?

  11. Anonymous

    Win the war?! That’s so easy to say sitting comfortably back in the U.S. The best way to support the troops is to bring them home as soon as is safely possible. I think it’s been made abundantly clear that there is no military solution for Iraq.

  12. Anonymous

    Win the war?! That’s so easy to say sitting comfortably back in the U.S. The best way to support the troops is to bring them home as soon as is safely possible. I think it’s been made abundantly clear that there is no military solution for Iraq.

  13. Anonymous

    Perhaps the list should be limited to those with a wes connection; graduates, sons or daughters of graduates or students that put their education on hold to join the service. This would be much more meaningful to the community and provide a link to the world outside the bubble.

  14. Anonymous

    Perhaps the list should be limited to those with a wes connection; graduates, sons or daughters of graduates or students that put their education on hold to join the service. This would be much more meaningful to the community and provide a link to the world outside the bubble.

  15. Bradley

    While I’d rather not break the meta-blogging barrier again, I think it might be appropriate for Wesleying’s contributors to discuss the appropriateness of posting the names of American casualties on this blog. Today’s post has the names of the fallen sandwiched between a post about an Onion piece and a joke about Martians invading Usdan. It seems to almost mock their sacrifice.While I think that we’d all do well to remember those that have given their lives in service to their country, there are more appropriate forums for such meditations than this one.

  16. Bradley

    While I’d rather not break the meta-blogging barrier again, I think it might be appropriate for Wesleying’s contributors to discuss the appropriateness of posting the names of American casualties on this blog.

    Today’s post has the names of the fallen sandwiched between a post about an Onion piece and a joke about Martians invading Usdan. It seems to almost mock their sacrifice.

    While I think that we’d all do well to remember those that have given their lives in service to their country, there are more appropriate forums for such meditations than this one.

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