Facebook "study group" may lead to Ryerson student’s expulsion

Someone named Ian points to this possibly worrying article in The Star. Facebook continues to prove itself a moral grey area and a site of visibility to those with whom you’d like to remain… more invisible. A student at Ryerson University is getting in trouble for administrating an online study group on Facebook – where academic misconduct is defined as “any deliberate activity to gain academic advantage.” Then again, it’s true that “the professor stipulated the online homework questions were to be done independently.”

Study groups may be a virtual trademark of the Ivory Tower – but a virtual study group has been slammed as cheating by Ryerson University.

First-year student Chris Avenir is fighting charges of academic misconduct for helping run an online chemistry study group via Facebook last term, where 146 classmates swapped tips on homework questions that counted for 10 per cent of their mark.

“All these students are scared s—less now about using Facebook to talk about schoolwork, when actually it’s no different than any study group working together on homework in a library,” said Neale [the student union’s advocacy coordinator].

“That’s the worst part; it’s creating this culture of fear, where if I post a question about physics homework on my friend’s wall (a Facebook bulletin board) and ask if anyone has any ideas how to approach this – and my prof sees this, am I cheating?” said Neale, who has used Facebook study groups herself.

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8 thoughts on “Facebook "study group" may lead to Ryerson student’s expulsion

  1. Anonymous

    Sagostsky: Yeah, you can say that after the fact, but like many things, it probably seemed harmless at the time. Also, I’m sure 146 kids didn’t all show up on the first day the group was created. Think, the tipping point.I don’t think these students should get in trouble. The school should just let their students know that from now on, online study groups aren’t allowed.

  2. Anonymous

    Sagostsky: Yeah, you can say that after the fact, but like many things, it probably seemed harmless at the time. Also, I’m sure 146 kids didn’t all show up on the first day the group was created. Think, the tipping point.

    I don’t think these students should get in trouble. The school should just let their students know that from now on, online study groups aren’t allowed.

  3. Sagotsky

    I mean… if they were sharing answers across 146 kids or whatever, that’s kind of fucked.

  4. Sagotsky

    I mean… if they were sharing answers across 146 kids or whatever, that’s kind of fucked.

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