College Courses Head to the Market

An article in today’s NYT called A Classroom’s Path to Entrepreneurship claims that more than 2,000 institutions have hands-on classes in business, that not only surpass the standard Econ 101, but have allowed students to market to the real world. One course at Monmouth University created a pasta sauce, Nanina’s Pasta sauce, that is currently “in four major supermarket chains including Pathmark and Whole foods”.

Now, Wesleyan is known to not have many “practical courses”, though it does arguably prepare us with skills and a way of thinking that can be applied to multiple jobs. But should Wes start to push for more hands on courses like these? It might get a boost in the number of Econ majors…

18 thoughts on “College Courses Head to the Market

  1. Anonymous

    Entrepreneurial skills aren’t things one gets “taught,” at least not in a college class. That’s why Monmouth alums aren’t leading the business world, and that’s also why Wes doesn’t offer business courses and yet its alums still go on to become business leaders.

  2. Anonymous

    Entrepreneurial skills aren’t things one gets “taught,” at least not in a college class. That’s why Monmouth alums aren’t leading the business world, and that’s also why Wes doesn’t offer business courses and yet its alums still go on to become business leaders.

  3. Anonymous

    It’s not the Econ department that’s against non-theory-based classes; Econ 127 for example is an intro accounting class with a very low enrollment limit. Richard Grossman, the Dept. Chair told me that the administration didn’t even want them to run the one section that they do.https://iasext.wesleyan.edu/regprod/!wesmaps_page.html?crse=011244&term=1071(Granted, there are 12 seats available, but who would want to take a 3 hr class on Friday??)The school definitely needs to reassess their standpoint on business classes.

  4. Anonymous

    It’s not the Econ department that’s against non-theory-based classes; Econ 127 for example is an intro accounting class with a very low enrollment limit. Richard Grossman, the Dept. Chair told me that the administration didn’t even want them to run the one section that they do.

    https://iasext.wesleyan.edu/regprod/!wesmaps_page.html?crse=011244&term=1071

    (Granted, there are 12 seats available, but who would want to take a 3 hr class on Friday??)

    The school definitely needs to reassess their standpoint on business classes.

  5. Anonymous

    Hey an MCC shoutout, nice. Uh, yeah, I think there should be more practical classes. It’d be nice to graduate from Wesleyan having Some kind of marketable skill. I felt like at Wes (and to a large extent high school) we learn to do this higher-level reasoning that has no use when you graduate because the people who hire you Don’t want to hear your higher-level reasoning. THEY want to do those things and they hate when you try to help them out with those things. They want you to be able to do practical things for them. So teaching entrepreneurial skills at least allows people to bypass the job-ladder hierarchy and do their own thing for money while spending their free time keeping american hegemony out of modern dance or whatever it is we learned about at wes. yes im somewhat bitter.

  6. Anonymous

    Hey an MCC shoutout, nice.

    Uh, yeah, I think there should be more practical classes. It’d be nice to graduate from Wesleyan having Some kind of marketable skill. I felt like at Wes (and to a large extent high school) we learn to do this higher-level reasoning that has no use when you graduate because the people who hire you Don’t want to hear your higher-level reasoning. THEY want to do those things and they hate when you try to help them out with those things. They want you to be able to do practical things for them. So teaching entrepreneurial skills at least allows people to bypass the job-ladder hierarchy and do their own thing for money while spending their free time keeping american hegemony out of modern dance or whatever it is we learned about at wes. yes im somewhat bitter.

  7. Anonymous

    And here I was thinking we’re not getting enough global ceramics theory in my pottery class.

  8. Anonymous

    And here I was thinking we’re not getting enough global ceramics theory in my pottery class.

  9. Anonymous

    Admit it, you’re only here because you couldn’t get into Monmouth or other quality schools with a high percentage of hands-on classes like Middlesex C.C.

  10. Anonymous

    Admit it, you’re only here because you couldn’t get into Monmouth or other quality schools with a high percentage of hands-on classes like Middlesex C.C.

  11. Anonymous

    Yes. I don’t think Wesleyan should turn down any new ideas regarding classes. If there are students that are interested, and I’ve met a bunch so I know there are, and if there are faculty members who are qualified, why n ot?

  12. Anonymous

    Yes.
    I don’t think Wesleyan should turn down any new ideas regarding classes. If there are students that are interested, and I’ve met a bunch so I know there are, and if there are faculty members who are qualified, why n ot?

  13. Anonymous

    As I understand it, the econ department is pretty set on teaching economic theory, not its application. That’s why they won’t accept credit for classes taken abroad/at other schools in business departments–because business is applied econ. That said, I think classes like this would be great at Wes.

  14. Anonymous

    As I understand it, the econ department is pretty set on teaching economic theory, not its application. That’s why they won’t accept credit for classes taken abroad/at other schools in business departments–because business is applied econ. That said, I think classes like this would be great at Wes.

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