A Computer for College Part 1: Explanations and General Recommendations

If you’re coming to Wesleyan you’re likely getting a new computer of some kind. And if you don’t obsessively follow computer news and benchmarks you’re likely to be at least a bit out of date concerning what to get and why, so I’m going to try to help. I hope this guide can be helpful for both those coming to Wesleyan for the first time, and for those returning.

Since there’s so much to cover, I’m going to do it in three parts. The first (this one) is going to cover what the different parts are and what you’re likely to need, as well as choosing an operating system. In the second part I’m going to be going through and pricing different laptops from a variety of different manufacturers to see where the best deals may be found, as well as some general tips for keeping the price of your computer down. The third installment is going to be about things you can do to keep your current computer running longer, better if you can’t afford/don’t want to buy a new one when you come to Wes, as well as some general computing suggestions and software.

Part I:

The Parts:

  • Processor: The ‘brain’ of the computer, a processor is what does general calculations
  • Hard Drive: Long-term data storage. There are two types: mechanical hard drives and solid state drives (SSDs). SSDs are new technology and extremely expensive, but they’re also much more resistent to abuse. However, given prices, a normal mechanical hard drive is what you’ll likely be getting.
  • RAM/Memory (Random Access Memory): Short term memory for your computer, RAM access is much faster than hard drive access, and your computer will do its best to keep running programs in RAM.
  • Graphics Card: Handles the calculations that display things on your screen. These can be either integrated into the motherboard and sharing system memory or can be discrete–a separate card that’s plugged in.

Other Things to watch:

  • Screen Size: Laptop screens generally range in size from 11-19″. If you’re looking for any kind of portability get something with a 15.4″ screen or smaller. Size is measured along the diagonal. Computer screens are either in a 4:3 (standard) or 16:10 (widescreen) aspect ratio–widescreen offers slightly less screen space for the same diagonal size, but lots of people (me included) prefer it. Screens also come in different resolutions, as well, which denote the number of pixels on the screen (pixels being the little dots of color that form the picture you see). Dimensions are width * length. A common standard aspect ratio resolution is 1280×1024, common widescreen resolutions are 1440×900 and 1680×1050 (although there are many, many more). What you get is your preference and is based mostly on the size of screen you get. Higher resolutions mean smaller, clearer pictures.
  • Weight: Your preference. The lighter, the easier it’s going to be to carry around.
  • Battery Life: How much you want to focus on this is again your preference. But the more the better.
  • Warranty: this is pretty self explanatory. The longer, obviously the better, but it’s not necessarily worth it to spend extra on longer warranties. Accidental damage protection is also something you may want to get–some manufacturers (ASUS) offer this free for a while, which is very nice.

What to Get:

General User:
This is most people. If you do mostly web browsing and word documents, this is where you should be. If you play only older games (WoW, WCIII, Source engine games, etc.) something with these specs and one of the lower-end graphics cards I suggested here should be fine.

  • Processor: Any dual core mobile offering by Intel or AMD should be fine. These will generally range from 1.6 to 2.4GHz. Higher numbers will generally get you better performance, but if you’re just performing basic tasks, you’re not going to notice it. Note that Intel’s processor’s will outperform AMD’s processors in terms of performance, but AMD’s processors are usually cheaper and with any of today’s modern processors can handle basic applications like web browsing easily.
  • Hard Drive: Everyone’s needs are different. However, I’d recommend that you stick with a 5400RPM hard drive (rather than 7200RPM) to keep power consumption and heat down. Size is your choice. 80GB should be the absolute minimum in size, but that will fill up pretty quickly if you plan on storing much media.
  • RAM: If you’re going Windows Vista get 2gb. If you’re going XP, OS X, or any Linux distro you can make do with 1gb. More RAM is nicer, but again, if you’re doing basic tasks, you probably won’t see any benefit with more than 2gb, even on Vista. Note that you won’t be able to use more than 4gb with a 32-bit operating system, which is what you’ll almost certainly be getting (see section on OS’s below for more on this)
  • Graphics Card: Stay with integrated graphics unless you plan on playing games. In that case, I would recommend something like an NVidia 8400GS, 9300GS, or an AMD Mobility Radeon HD 3400, all of which should run older games acceptably (although not always on the highest settings). If you’re looking into more serious gaming, you’re in the wrong category.
  • Screen Size: Under NO circumstances should you go over 15.4″ in terms of screen size–there simply is no point based on what you’re putting into the computer.
  • Battery Life: I would try to buy something with at least 2.5-3 hours. If you’re really set on all-day computing without a cord, there are laptops that get 8 or more hours of battery life–although you’ll obviously pay a premium.

Prices you can expect:

  • You can find a typical basic laptop that will meet most people’s needs for $500-1000
  • Higher priced units will get you things like smaller size, better battery life, and better support


Power User:
If you’re playing newer games, doing photo or video manipulation and editing, rendering 3D scenes, or other computation-intensive work you’re going to want something more from a computer than a machine created from the specs above is going to give you.

  • Processor: get an Intel Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Extreme, or Core 2 Quad running at at least 2GHz. 2.4GHz is a good compromise between performance and cost in my opinion. AMD’s mobile processors are unfortunately don’t perform well enough for me to consider them for gaming or other heavy processor work. Note that getting a Core 2 Quad over a Core 2 Duo is probably going to take bad battery life and make it absolutely dismal–for the vast, vast majority of people, a Core 2 Duo (or dual core Core 2 Extreme) should be fine. Processor performance is especially important for picture and video work, although unless you’re doing some very serious editing, it’s still probably not worth it to take the jump to the much more expensive Core 2 Extreme processor line.
  • Hard Drive: You can go either 5400 or 7200RPM–higher hard drive speeds will generally get you faster loading (and booting) times, but will run hotter, be louder, and cost more. I do a decent amount of gaming and have run into no problems with a 5400RPM hard drive. Size is up to you here as well. If you have lots of large files you may want to look into an external hard drive with Firewire or eSATA (and buy a laptop with corresponding connections), both of which are much faster than USB 2.0.
  • RAM: 2GB is the minimum, more is good (although more than 4GB is probably excessive for most gaming use). Keep in mind that if you’re running a 32-bit OS, you’ll only be able to use 4GB (and this is COMBINED system memory AND graphics card memory). If you want to use more, you may want to look into a 64-bit OS. (If you have no idea what I’m talking about, see the ‘Operating Systems’ section below). If you’re doing graphics work, you’ll want lots–4GB or possibly more (which again, ties you into a 64-bit OS).
  • Graphics Card: This is the most important part of your computer if you’re looking at gaming performance, bar absolutely nothing. Models that will give at least decent performance on newer games are: NVidia GeForce 8600M GS < gt =" 9500M" gt =" 9650M"> 512mb GDDR2. If you’re doing other 3D work (AutoCAD, etc.) you’re probably going to want a workstation-level graphics card, either from NVidia’s Quadro line or AMD’s FireGL line. If you’re doing video/audio/graphics work, your applications are almost certainly not dependent on a graphics card for performance, and a lower end graphics card, such as an NVidia GeForce 8400M GS or 9300M GS should be fine.
  • Screen Size: You probably won’t be able to get a decent laptop with these kinds of specs in anything smaller than a 15.4″ package. I personally recommend very strongly you don’t go over 15.4″ either–anything larger and mobility will be very much at stake.
  • Battery Life: I wouldn’t go below 1.5 hours–more is obviously better, but not always feasible given what you’re putting into the computer.

Prices to expect:

  • $1300-1600: medium settings on newer games
  • $1600-$2000: high settings on most newer games
  • $2000+: high to very high settings on almost everything (I make no promises about Crysis)

Other Notes:

  • Since Macs now have Intel processors, gaming on Macs is now feasible. If you’re interested, you’ll want a MacBook Pro with a dedicated graphics card. To get games to run, you can use Boot Camp or VMWare Fusion or Parrallels Desktop–this will let you install Windows XP or Vista to play games on. You can also try using applications like Wine or Cider to let you play games straight from your OS X install.
  • Speaking as someone who has a 15.4″ notebook, I can say that if you live close enough that transportation isn’t much of a problem, getting both a desktop for gaming and a subnotebook (think EeePC or similar) for taking to class is something you should seriously consider. An $800-1000 desktop will get you gaming performance equivalent or better than a $2000+ notebook, and you can get an EeePC or something like it for ~$400. You’ll spend less money, get better gaming performance, and have a much more portable notebook. The only real disadvantages are space (which isn’t a huge issue in my opinion) and transportation. If you’re going to be flying, taking a desktop isn’t going to work. Getting desktops to the LAN parties we hold can be a bit of a pain too, although plenty of people do it.

Operating Systems:
Most people will be going with either Windows Vista, Windows XP, or Macintosh OS X 10.5. This is mostly a matter of personal preference. I personally prefer Vista over XP, but lots of people disagree with me. If you’re on a tight budget, you’ll get better performance with XP–although realize that the last day XP will be available to be sold is June 30th, 2008, so if you want XP, don’t wait too long. If you’re unsure, but buying a mid-high range laptop, I would say go with Vista.

Windows or OS X is most certainly a matter of preference–I use Windows, and I think the split is something like 50/50 on campus–both are fully supported by the ITS Helpdesk.

Linux, BSD, or something else is an option as well, but if you’re considering any of these, there are much better sources than me for the information–I will say that dual-booting one (or more) of these with either Windows or OS X would be best if you’re new to it.

If you’re looking at getting 4GB of RAM or more, you’re going to want to make sure you get a 64-bit version of whatever operating system you’re using. OS’s have until recently been built primarily on a 32-bit architecture. However, limitations on that architecture prevent the operating system from addressing more than 4GB of RAM total. To address this (and other issues) 64-bit versions of operating systems are now available and are becoming more widely used. Any modern processor should be capable of running either 32 or 64-bit versions of Windows or any other OS. 64-bit driver support has gotten pretty good lately, and so the only problems you’re likely to have are with very old hardware. (OS X is completely 64-bit, and so this is only something you need to worry about with Windows or GNU/Linux.)

If anyone has suggestions, questions, comments, or corrections, please post in the comments. Given the rapidly changing nature of the computer market, this will remain a work in progress!

As a final note, remember that these are simply recommendations and explanations, and neither I nor Wesleying are responsible for what you do with your money.

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102 thoughts on “A Computer for College Part 1: Explanations and General Recommendations

  1. Anonymous

    The split between and Mac and PC over the entire campus is pretty even 45/55 one way or the other. As far as the incoming class, however, there is some like a 65/35 split, Mac to PC.

  2. Anonymous

    The split between and Mac and PC over the entire campus is pretty even 45/55 one way or the other. As far as the incoming class, however, there is some like a 65/35 split, Mac to PC.

  3. Anonymous

    Someone mentioned using WesHub on Linux w/ DC++ VirtualBox. There is a native Linux DC++ client – linuxdcpp. Looks and acts just like the Windows version.

  4. Anonymous

    Someone mentioned using WesHub on Linux w/ DC++ VirtualBox. There is a native Linux DC++ client – linuxdcpp. Looks and acts just like the Windows version.

  5. Sam

    9:50: 1) Unless you’re playing graphics-intensive games the only argument for a desktop is affordability. A laptop will be much more convenient, and is what I’d recommend for the majority of people. 2) Windows or Mac should be entirely what you’re more comfortable with. Macs generally have a bit of a price premium over Windows-based computers, although not too much (and I, myself, will see how big the difference really is at the moment when I finish going through looking at individual computer models). Both are supported by ITS. The split is about 50/50 (I think), so I wouldn’t say there’s any kind of consensus.

  6. Sam

    9:50:
    1) Unless you’re playing graphics-intensive games the only argument for a desktop is affordability. A laptop will be much more convenient, and is what I’d recommend for the majority of people.
    2) Windows or Mac should be entirely what you’re more comfortable with. Macs generally have a bit of a price premium over Windows-based computers, although not too much (and I, myself, will see how big the difference really is at the moment when I finish going through looking at individual computer models). Both are supported by ITS. The split is about 50/50 (I think), so I wouldn’t say there’s any kind of consensus.

  7. Anonymous

    I absolutely recommend a Mac. I have friends who are kicking themselves for buying a Windows laptop. If you are intent on using Windows, avoid Vista, as it is poorly supported by ITS.That said, even as a computer science major, you will find any computer available has what you need to get your work done.

  8. Anonymous

    I absolutely recommend a Mac. I have friends who are kicking themselves for buying a Windows laptop. If you are intent on using Windows, avoid Vista, as it is poorly supported by ITS.

    That said, even as a computer science major, you will find any computer available has what you need to get your work done.

  9. Anonymous

    Sam: As the father of an incoming student (and the one who has to pay for his computer at Wes!) I am curious as to what advice you can give me (and your readers) about two interrelated questions: (1) whether to get a desktop or a laptop, and (2) whether to go for a Windows-based or Mac system.I am not asking for answers in the abstract but answers that relate to what works best for students on a campus like Wesleyan and it’s technology assets. If there is a campus “culture” or “consensus” about computers, I would appreciate knowing about that.Of course, for us, affordability is always a consideration.My son has a Dell at home but is open to using a Mac at school.I am looking forward to further installments in your series.

  10. Anonymous

    Sam: As the father of an incoming student (and the one who has to pay for his computer at Wes!) I am curious as to what advice you can give me (and your readers) about two interrelated questions: (1) whether to get a desktop or a laptop, and (2) whether to go for a Windows-based or Mac system.

    I am not asking for answers in the abstract but answers that relate to what works best for students on a campus like Wesleyan and it’s technology assets. If there is a campus “culture” or “consensus” about computers, I would appreciate knowing about that.

    Of course, for us, affordability is always a consideration.

    My son has a Dell at home but is open to using a Mac at school.

    I am looking forward to further installments in your series.

  11. Ishuku

    i got a dell inspiron 600m in the summer or spring of 2004. let me just say that the computers might not be sexy or cool anymore but their warranty is AMAZING. i’ve only had to send it in once in four years: sophomore year, it refused to boot up after blue screen of death. i got it back a few days later, all my data intact. my dad is kind of OCD about everything, so little things that i didn’t even care about, he would call dell and they would send someone over to replace it: a new trackpad, charger cable, and screen were all replaced under warranty.

  12. Ishuku

    i got a dell inspiron 600m in the summer or spring of 2004. let me just say that the computers might not be sexy or cool anymore but their warranty is AMAZING. i’ve only had to send it in once in four years: sophomore year, it refused to boot up after blue screen of death. i got it back a few days later, all my data intact. my dad is kind of OCD about everything, so little things that i didn’t even care about, he would call dell and they would send someone over to replace it: a new trackpad, charger cable, and screen were all replaced under warranty.

  13. Anonymous

    also, windows blow so no need for boot camp. why the fuck would anyone want to use windows…

  14. Anonymous

    also, windows blow so no need for boot camp.

    why the fuck would anyone want to use windows…

  15. Anonymous

    ok to save everyone’s time, trouble, and their already declining eyesight from reading the 42 comments above, here’s the bottom line:get a macbook (or a blackbook) and a 19 inch screen or tv or whatever (good one from dell for like $250- same display as those used in the apple display, seriously.)that way…on the go = lighter than macbook pros (which are pretty fucking heavy when you carry them around the whole day)in the room = big screenjust to let you know, the speakers in the macbooks suck. but… headphones or a pair of $40 speakers for the room is a fix for that.any questions? feel free to contact me at mroth@obama.edu

  16. Anonymous

    ok to save everyone’s time, trouble, and their already declining eyesight from reading the 42 comments above, here’s the bottom line:

    get a macbook (or a blackbook) and a 19 inch screen or tv or whatever (good one from dell for like $250- same display as those used in the apple display, seriously.)

    that way…

    on the go = lighter than macbook pros (which are pretty fucking heavy when you carry them around the whole day)

    in the room = big screen

    just to let you know, the speakers in the macbooks suck. but… headphones or a pair of $40 speakers for the room is a fix for that.

    any questions? feel free to contact me at mroth@obama.edu

  17. Sam

    I would normally say go with XP, since games will run slightly faster. Malware, etc., shouldn’t really be a problem if all you’re doing on it is gaming. However, since XP won’t be sold after June 30th, I’d say wait till you get to Wes and pick up a Vista CD in the computer store for $20–unless you have tons of money to burn, that is.

  18. Sam

    I would normally say go with XP, since games will run slightly faster. Malware, etc., shouldn’t really be a problem if all you’re doing on it is gaming. However, since XP won’t be sold after June 30th, I’d say wait till you get to Wes and pick up a Vista CD in the computer store for $20–unless you have tons of money to burn, that is.

  19. Anonymous

    i’ll probably get a MBP and use bootcamp. question is, should i go with vista or xp pro? my friends who use vista don’t have that many complaints except that it requires a lot of memory and the admin privilege concept is a bit of a pain in the ass. but the interface itself doesn’t look too bad…xp pro will run the games faster, and run a bit smoother/faster in general. but it is more vulnerable to viruses, trojans, etc… comments? suggestions?

  20. Anonymous

    i’ll probably get a MBP and use bootcamp. question is, should i go with vista or xp pro? my friends who use vista don’t have that many complaints except that it requires a lot of memory and the admin privilege concept is a bit of a pain in the ass. but the interface itself doesn’t look too bad…
    xp pro will run the games faster, and run a bit smoother/faster in general. but it is more vulnerable to viruses, trojans, etc… comments? suggestions?

  21. Anonymous

    Initially OS X users *did* have to install the Clean Access client, but there were some problems with it (even though it barely did anything) so the requirement was lifted. However if you got the client before then it will continue to work.I *believe* the plan is to eventually require the client for OS X once the bugs are ironed out and/or it starts doing something useful.

  22. Anonymous

    Initially OS X users *did* have to install the Clean Access client, but there were some problems with it (even though it barely did anything) so the requirement was lifted. However if you got the client before then it will continue to work.

    I *believe* the plan is to eventually require the client for OS X once the bugs are ironed out and/or it starts doing something useful.

  23. Sam

    1:28: really? I remember you having to install something at the beginning of the year…did that change?2:59: I don’t. If you had read even a little way into my post, you would have seen that part of the third installment in this series is going to be about small changes you can make to a current laptop or desktop to get it running much faster. I realize not everyone can afford a new computer–I have friends that came to Wes with old computers. Please read before you start judging me. 9:50: No, I wouldn’t say that’s too big–it’s about the same size as mine. It’s not going to be super-portable, but it’s not going to be at all hard to take it places. I bring mine to class every day with no problems. The software that’s almost free ($20 for a disc) is I believe mostly/all Microsoft software (office, windows, etc.). Other things are lower prices than they would be elsewhere though, I think.10:53: Later this week or early next week. I’m going back to Wes for the summer to work and I’m moving this weekend, and I’m also trying to finish up a few things before the week ends, so I’m going to be rather busy. Not too long though.2:56: A good suggestion. The newest version of Ubuntu also includes something called Wubi, which lets you install Ubuntu in a directory inside of Windows, and makes for a pretty painless install. After that, you can boot it as normal.3:03: There’s no difference between Vista and any other version of Windows on the campus network. And CCA has really gotten much less annoying since they fixed the sign-in times.

  24. Sam

    1:28: really? I remember you having to install something at the beginning of the year…did that change?

    2:59: I don’t. If you had read even a little way into my post, you would have seen that part of the third installment in this series is going to be about small changes you can make to a current laptop or desktop to get it running much faster. I realize not everyone can afford a new computer–I have friends that came to Wes with old computers. Please read before you start judging me.

    9:50: No, I wouldn’t say that’s too big–it’s about the same size as mine. It’s not going to be super-portable, but it’s not going to be at all hard to take it places. I bring mine to class every day with no problems.

    The software that’s almost free ($20 for a disc) is I believe mostly/all Microsoft software (office, windows, etc.). Other things are lower prices than they would be elsewhere though, I think.

    10:53: Later this week or early next week. I’m going back to Wes for the summer to work and I’m moving this weekend, and I’m also trying to finish up a few things before the week ends, so I’m going to be rather busy. Not too long though.

    2:56: A good suggestion. The newest version of Ubuntu also includes something called Wubi, which lets you install Ubuntu in a directory inside of Windows, and makes for a pretty painless install. After that, you can boot it as normal.

    3:03: There’s no difference between Vista and any other version of Windows on the campus network. And CCA has really gotten much less annoying since they fixed the sign-in times.

  25. Anonymous

    If you want a desktop but don’t want to have something huge, consider buying a computer from Shuttle (http://us.shuttle.com/). These are great spacesavers that can be very powerful if you customize/upgrade from the basic models. The only drawback is that because they are physically compact, you are limited in future expansion.The original post also mentions ultraportables such as the Asus eeePC. I wanted to let you know that Dell just said they are also going to release an ultraportable this summer.

  26. Anonymous

    If you want a desktop but don’t want to have something huge, consider buying a computer from Shuttle (http://us.shuttle.com/). These are great spacesavers that can be very powerful if you customize/upgrade from the basic models. The only drawback is that because they are physically compact, you are limited in future expansion.

    The original post also mentions ultraportables such as the Asus eeePC. I wanted to let you know that Dell just said they are also going to release an ultraportable this summer.

  27. Anonymous

    i would really suggest you NOT get vista for Wesleyan’s campus. it’s such a pain to deal with the internet on campus and vista.

  28. Anonymous

    i would really suggest you NOT get vista for Wesleyan’s campus. it’s such a pain to deal with the internet on campus and vista.

  29. Anonymous

    to 9:50…15″ and 5lbs is a perfectly acceptable size. I wouldn’t go over 15.4″ or 6lbs, but anything lighter or smaller would be fine. if you really want a 17″ screen, go for it, but remember it’ll be heavier.i have a macbook pro, which is 15.4″ screen and just over 5lbs, and its fine for bringing around campus

  30. Anonymous

    to 9:50…

    15″ and 5lbs is a perfectly acceptable size. I wouldn’t go over 15.4″ or 6lbs, but anything lighter or smaller would be fine. if you really want a 17″ screen, go for it, but remember it’ll be heavier.

    i have a macbook pro, which is 15.4″ screen and just over 5lbs, and its fine for bringing around campus

  31. Anonymous

    What is recommended in terms of screen size and weight?Is 15’’ and 5 lbs. to big?What software does the Computer Store offer at a discounted price?

  32. Anonymous

    What is recommended in terms of screen size and weight?
    Is 15’’ and 5 lbs. to big?

    What software does the Computer Store offer at a discounted price?

  33. Anonymous

    2:59, this doesn’t assume everyone is getting a new computer. If 25 people need advice, this post is still useful. Are you saying that just because not everyone here is a photographer, people shouldn’t post advice on what cameras to use? Project your bitterness to a more useful medium.

  34. Anonymous

    2:59, this doesn’t assume everyone is getting a new computer. If 25 people need advice, this post is still useful. Are you saying that just because not everyone here is a photographer, people shouldn’t post advice on what cameras to use? Project your bitterness to a more useful medium.

  35. Anonymous

    How do you presume that everyone coming to wes can afford a new computer? I have gone three years without one, your post makes me feel just great and reminds me once again how out of place I often feel at a school where people don’t even have to think about spending $1000…if I had that money it would prolly just go to my tutition. Sometimes I think I am the only person here putting myself through school.

  36. Anonymous

    How do you presume that everyone coming to wes can afford a new computer? I have gone three years without one, your post makes me feel just great and reminds me once again how out of place I often feel at a school where people don’t even have to think about spending $1000…if I had that money it would prolly just go to my tutition. Sometimes I think I am the only person here putting myself through school.

  37. Anonymous

    Another note: if you’re planning on getting a mac of any kind, dont buy additional RAM from apple. If you want that extra gig, buy it from a third party and install it yourself.And while the black macbook is totes rad and all, know that youre paying extra just for the color. You can configure the exact same laptop (in white) for $100 less. But hey, go profit margins!Finally, as a Macbook owner Id say that low-end gaming is fine. I run Worms: Armageddon and WoW perfectly fine, which is enough to kill my work ethic when needed. I also have a friend with a Macbook Pro, so I can tell you that the GeForce 8600M GT is fantastic for gaming. He can run Crysis on medium settings at a perfectly acceptable frame rate.

  38. Anonymous

    Another note: if you’re planning on getting a mac of any kind, dont buy additional RAM from apple. If you want that extra gig, buy it from a third party and install it yourself.

    And while the black macbook is totes rad and all, know that youre paying extra just for the color. You can configure the exact same laptop (in white) for $100 less. But hey, go profit margins!

    Finally, as a Macbook owner Id say that low-end gaming is fine. I run Worms: Armageddon and WoW perfectly fine, which is enough to kill my work ethic when needed. I also have a friend with a Macbook Pro, so I can tell you that the GeForce 8600M GT is fantastic for gaming. He can run Crysis on medium settings at a perfectly acceptable frame rate.

  39. Anonymous

    Sam: for Cisco Clean Access, you don’t actually install anything on a Mac. when you open a web browser a login screen, similar to Wesleyan’s webmail program, appears and you type in your username/password. then the page redirects to your homepage. just fyi

  40. Anonymous

    Sam: for Cisco Clean Access, you don’t actually install anything on a Mac.

    when you open a web browser a login screen, similar to Wesleyan’s webmail program, appears and you type in your username/password. then the page redirects to your homepage.

    just fyi

  41. Anonymous

    this is funnyhttp://discovermagazine.com/2007/jun/how-much-does-the-internet-weigh

  42. Justin L.

    Sam, nice work. I think you’ve inspired me to write a similar feature from a more Mac-centric point of view. Coming soon.

  43. Justin L.

    Sam, nice work. I think you’ve inspired me to write a similar feature from a more Mac-centric point of view. Coming soon.

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