NYPost: Columnist’s.. uhh… interesting take on Obama’s address

So we’ve seen all sorts of media coverage so far about Obama’s commencement address at Wesleyan, ranging from the traditional to the student-directed to the satirical. But this column today by Adam Brodsky entitled “BAM’S LAND OF LOSERS: HIS PATHETIC ADVICE TO GRADS” was too good to pass up… and I don’t think it’s intended to be satire. I think he really means it:

Obama’s America has two groups: those in need – and those who care for them. Missing are the folks who produce real wealth – the goods and services all Americans enjoy. Obama could have galvanized the grads, urging them to follow in the paths of these heroes – to take a job, say, with Big Oil and invent a cheaper way to make cars run. Instead, he ladled out soggy oatmeal. FOR all his soaring, hopeful rhetoric, Barack Obama chose an odd message this week to send Wesleyan’s graduating seniors.

Face it, kids – he basically said – Americans are losers. Pathetic, needy dependents who can’t make it without help. So forget your dreams, dear graduates. Go forth and aid your fellow deadbeats.

Never mind “The Audacity of Hope.” Obama was trumpeting “The Ubiquity of Failure.” “The Equality of Need.” “The Endlessness of the Dole.”

OK, I exaggerate – a little. Here are his actual words: “Our collective service can shape the destiny of this generation . . . Individual salvation depends on collective salvation.”

That is, unless we come together and fix America’s myriad flaws (like poverty, which never disappears), we’re all doomed.

But his speech was more than just recycled graduation clichés. Obama, who worked as a community organizer in his youth, was describing his world, his vision.

Yes, he’s sometimes paid rhetorical homage to American capitalism, acknowledging that it has “led to a standard of living unmatched in history.”

But his record betrays something else: He favors higher taxes, “fair trade” over “free trade,” a higher minimum wage, bailouts for subprime “victims,” penalties for “predatory lenders,” bigger subsidies for health care and housing.

For Obama, such stands – and a communal spirit – offer “change” and “hope.”

“All it takes is one act of service,” he says, “one blow against injustice, to send forth what Robert Kennedy called that tiny ripple of hope.”

But America is neither unjust nor bereft of hope. Far from it.

And if Barack Obama thinks the next generation of Americans needs to spend its time dwelling on this nation’s “wrongs” and catering to the “underserved,” he’s got a sad vision for America indeed.

That’s right, Wes grads. America is not unjust! Wow, good to hear! I guess I’ll just believe it now. Also, apparently, it would be soooo sad if you spent time trying to fix the nation’s wrongs and tried to serve the underserved. Don’t do that. Don’t listen to Obama, that commie.

Read the rest here.

10 thoughts on “NYPost: Columnist’s.. uhh… interesting take on Obama’s address

  1. steadyjohn

    Hey 5:43 – I’ve got news for you. The New York Post is a real newspaper and the Brodsky column was an opinion, not news.

  2. steadyjohn

    Hey 5:43 – I’ve got news for you. The New York Post is a real newspaper and the Brodsky column was an opinion, not news.

  3. Adam

    I hear the editor of the new york post is offering a reward for shots of that menace spider-man .

  4. Adam

    I hear the editor of the new york post is offering a reward for shots of that menace spider-man .

  5. Anonymous

    Everyone knows the New York Post isn’t even a real newspaper. I have no respect for anyone who uses it as their main source of news.

  6. Anonymous

    Everyone knows the New York Post isn’t even a real newspaper. I have no respect for anyone who uses it as their main source of news.

  7. Anonymous

    I don’t think Obama discouraged going in to big business or law… I think he just discouraged doing it for selfish reasons, which is legitimate.

  8. Anonymous

    I don’t think Obama discouraged going in to big business or law… I think he just discouraged doing it for selfish reasons, which is legitimate.

  9. Estrella

    Well, I did find this pretty annoying:”So that by the time I graduated from college, I was possessed with a crazy idea – that I would work at a grassroots level to bring about change…. My mother and grandparents wanted me to go to law school. My friends were applying to jobs on Wall Street. Meanwhile, this organization offered me $12,000 a year plus $2,000 for an old, beat-up car.And I said yes.”we all know what happened so it wasn’t exactly deceptive, but he wound up going to (and excelling) Harvard Law, even taking a summer associate position at Sidley-Austin (6th biggest firm in the country I believe) and ultimately it was his JD that allowed him to do a lot of the work he has done, so I think the editorial does msake a good point when it says that it is inaccurate and deceptive to paint a picture that doing work with NGOs etc is the best way to effect change.

  10. Estrella

    Well, I did find this pretty annoying:

    “So that by the time I graduated from college, I was possessed with a crazy idea – that I would work at a grassroots level to bring about change…. My mother and grandparents wanted me to go to law school. My friends were applying to jobs on Wall Street. Meanwhile, this organization offered me $12,000 a year plus $2,000 for an old, beat-up car.

    And I said yes.”

    we all know what happened so it wasn’t exactly deceptive, but he wound up going to (and excelling) Harvard Law, even taking a summer associate position at Sidley-Austin (6th biggest firm in the country I believe) and ultimately it was his JD that allowed him to do a lot of the work he has done, so I think the editorial does msake a good point when it says that it is inaccurate and deceptive to paint a picture that doing work with NGOs etc is the best way to effect change.

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