It’s official.

A brief roundup of New York Times coverage thus far:

Obama Claims Nomination; First Black Candidate to Lead a Major Party Ticket

Senator Barack Obama claimed the Democratic presidential nomination on Tuesday evening, prevailing through an epic battle with Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton in a primary campaign that inspired millions of voters from every corner of America to demand change in Washington.

Next on Agenda Is Clinton’s Role

Mrs. Clinton used her final hours of the long primary season to make clear that she would be open to being Mr. Obama’s running mate. If there was ever any hope in Democratic circles that she would let Mr. Obama off the hook with an evasion or a flat declaration of no interest, Mrs. Clinton dashed it on Tuesday.

Calm in the Swirl of History

On the cusp of becoming the first African-American to capture a major party nomination, Mr. Obama remains a protean political figure, inspiring devotion in supporters who see him as a transformative leader even as he remains inscrutable to critics.

Some 18,000 supporters of Senator Barack Obama gathered Tuesday night at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul to hear him speak on the last day of the long primary campaign.

20 thoughts on “It’s official.

  1. Nick

    Too true, Anon 10:34. We’re within the margin of error here, as far as both the popular and electoral counts are concerned. In that regard:Real Clear Politics has fantastic polling coverage, for both the electoral and popular vote.Open Left does pretty frequent election/electoral college spreads, with analysis of what it means.Still, I was listening to Bill O’Reilly’s talk show today (because I’m a masochist, apparently), and it was clear that – in spite of himself – he can’t help but like Obama. Just a little. As much as he argued against Obama’s policy of withdrawal (poorly), he was just a little too excited in his descriptions of Obama’s well-run campaign and excellent speaking ability. He called last night a “historic moment,” without a shred of his usual malice. O’Reilly is, of course, still national media. But whatever else it is, I’m thinking this election will at least be different.

  2. Nick

    Too true, Anon 10:34. We’re within the margin of error here, as far as both the popular and electoral counts are concerned.

    In that regard:

    Real Clear Politics has fantastic polling coverage, for both the electoral and popular vote.

    Open Left does pretty frequent election/electoral college spreads, with analysis of what it means.

    Still, I was listening to Bill O’Reilly’s talk show today (because I’m a masochist, apparently), and it was clear that – in spite of himself – he can’t help but like Obama. Just a little. As much as he argued against Obama’s policy of withdrawal (poorly), he was just a little too excited in his descriptions of Obama’s well-run campaign and excellent speaking ability. He called last night a “historic moment,” without a shred of his usual malice.

    O’Reilly is, of course, still national media. But whatever else it is, I’m thinking this election will at least be different.

  3. Anonymous

    We’re in such a blue state, and Wesleyan is even deeper blue. But if you read news sites from west and south of the Mid-Atlantic states, and east of the Ore.Wash.Cali corridor, Obama is not as favored or looked upon as favorably. The national news media loves him so they will do all they can to ensure his election, but the electoral vote tally will be tough – especially if he cannot carry Fla, Penn and one of Ohio/Mo. Bigger worry point – both the recent Rasmussen and Gallop polls only have him 7-10 points ahead in California, which has been blue since Bill Clinton. That’s with +/- 4 points margin of error – so waaaaay too close for a state that’s usually a 20+ point lead for Democratic presidential candidate. All signs to pay attention to, if not be concerned about. My point – celebrate, but this is by no means in the bag.

  4. Anonymous

    We’re in such a blue state, and Wesleyan is even deeper blue. But if you read news sites from west and south of the Mid-Atlantic states, and east of the Ore.Wash.Cali corridor, Obama is not as favored or looked upon as favorably. The national news media loves him so they will do all they can to ensure his election, but the electoral vote tally will be tough – especially if he cannot carry Fla, Penn and one of Ohio/Mo. Bigger worry point – both the recent Rasmussen and Gallop polls only have him 7-10 points ahead in California, which has been blue since Bill Clinton. That’s with +/- 4 points margin of error – so waaaaay too close for a state that’s usually a 20+ point lead for Democratic presidential candidate. All signs to pay attention to, if not be concerned about. My point – celebrate, but this is by no means in the bag.

  5. Nick

    This is such a weird race, and I’m struck by the oddity of the moment of celebration. Consider:Obama’s nomination has been all but inevitable since the Wisconsin-era primaries, and unquestionable for at least the last month. Yet, in spite of winning the delegate race, he hasn’t actually been given the nomination yet. Furthermore, his primary opponent didn’t even concede last night!What exactly did yesterday mean?Whatever, though, I’m still ecstatic. He was the best choice, and we’re in the midst of a shift that was decades in the making. Also, if he wins and the dems pick up the hefty number of house and senate seats that they’re poised to, then this could be the biggest progressive shift since FDR.

  6. Nick

    This is such a weird race, and I’m struck by the oddity of the moment of celebration. Consider:

    Obama’s nomination has been all but inevitable since the Wisconsin-era primaries, and unquestionable for at least the last month. Yet, in spite of winning the delegate race, he hasn’t actually been given the nomination yet. Furthermore, his primary opponent didn’t even concede last night!

    What exactly did yesterday mean?

    Whatever, though, I’m still ecstatic. He was the best choice, and we’re in the midst of a shift that was decades in the making. Also, if he wins and the dems pick up the hefty number of house and senate seats that they’re poised to, then this could be the biggest progressive shift since FDR.

  7. Anonymous

    There is no real news in the “most high-profile pound of all time” either but wtf.

  8. Anonymous

    There is no real news in the “most high-profile pound of all time” either but wtf.

  9. Anonymous

    and, 11:50, there’s no real news there. Wowie kazowie, an old conservative white guy gets the Republican nomination! This is a little more historic and exciting, don’t you think?

  10. Anonymous

    and, 11:50, there’s no real news there. Wowie kazowie, an old conservative white guy gets the Republican nomination!

    This is a little more historic and exciting, don’t you think?

  11. Anonymous

    11:50, if you actually believe that McCain will be the next president you must be blinded by cynicism. Eight years of the Bush/Rove propaganda machine against a weak Democratic party might have jaded you, but there is really no way McCain will be able to contend with Obama’s superior oratorial skills, moral standpoint, consistency, and youthful energy (and good looks) once this election season actually begins. The Bush/Gore and Bush/Kerry elections were different – neither Gore or Kerry were able to provide a compelling case against Bush, but this race is very different. I’m not sure if you actually support McCain, or are just resigned to him winning. If it’s the latter, I think your resignation is ill-founded.

  12. Anonymous

    11:50, if you actually believe that McCain will be the next president you must be blinded by cynicism. Eight years of the Bush/Rove propaganda machine against a weak Democratic party might have jaded you, but there is really no way McCain will be able to contend with Obama’s superior oratorial skills, moral standpoint, consistency, and youthful energy (and good looks) once this election season actually begins.

    The Bush/Gore and Bush/Kerry elections were different – neither Gore or Kerry were able to provide a compelling case against Bush, but this race is very different. I’m not sure if you actually support McCain, or are just resigned to him winning. If it’s the latter, I think your resignation is ill-founded.

  13. Anonymous

    I’m looking back in your archives looking for an analogous piece about McCain. What, no love for the next president of The United States?

  14. Anonymous

    I’m looking back in your archives looking for an analogous piece about McCain. What, no love for the next president of The United States?

Comments are closed.