Gas Prices Affecting College Classes?

A recent NYT article reports that the high cost of gas has caused college students to opt for online classes more and more. Unlike students at Wesleyan,

The vast majority of the nation’s 15 million college students — at least 79 percent — live off campus, and with gas prices above $4 a gallon, many are seeking to cut commuting costs by studying online.

For the most part, this affects community colleges, which offer a lot more online courses. However, the article takes it a little extreme when the president of a community college in Florida expresses concern that mounting fuel costs could force some students to drop out of college altogether, especially since only a fraction of courses at most colleges are offered online.”

Also, the article recognizes that online courses do exclude certain categories of people, mainly those students who live in rural (and to add, poor inner-city) areas:

“The infrastructure doesn’t exist to give all rural students clear online access,” said Stephen G. Katsinas, a professor at the University of Alabama. “Rural America is where the digital divide is most dramatic.”

It appears that this is more of an incendiary piece to fuel the dreaded gas-scare uproar, but maybe for once Wesleyan’s on-campus living rule can be appreciated.

18 thoughts on “Gas Prices Affecting College Classes?

  1. wes alum

    umm, I know its hard to imagine from inside the bubble, but rural college students some times drive from two or three towns over to get to class. They are already on limited incomes. Some are parenting. Gas prices really can effect college attendance and it can increase the already wide gulf between privileged students like yourselves and those who might not even have the privilege to go if this keeps up. When I went to wes people seemed to get that not everyone lives like the handful of you all do, it is sad to see that even with all of the evidence around you, that isn’t true anymore.

  2. wes alum

    umm, I know its hard to imagine from inside the bubble, but rural college students some times drive from two or three towns over to get to class. They are already on limited incomes. Some are parenting. Gas prices really can effect college attendance and it can increase the already wide gulf between privileged students like yourselves and those who might not even have the privilege to go if this keeps up. When I went to wes people seemed to get that not everyone lives like the handful of you all do, it is sad to see that even with all of the evidence around you, that isn’t true anymore.

  3. Anonymous

    holy fuck do you know how expensive wesleyan is compared to commuting to community colleges?

  4. Anonymous

    holy fuck do you know how expensive wesleyan is compared to commuting to community colleges?

  5. Anonymous

    well the fact that so many of us live far away from middletown means that our airline tickets (or gas money to drive to wes) are outrageous!! not to mention financial aid packages are not reflecting the heightened travel costs.personally my financial aid package allotted me $500 for travel costs to/from wesleyan for the entire 08-09 school year (i live 700 miles from middletown)… and i was lucky to find a roundtrip flight to wes in august and back home in december for $250. so by financial aid’s $500 for travel logic, i dont get to go home for fall break, thanksgiving break, or spring break.

  6. Anonymous

    well the fact that so many of us live far away from middletown means that our airline tickets (or gas money to drive to wes) are outrageous!! not to mention financial aid packages are not reflecting the heightened travel costs.
    personally my financial aid package allotted me $500 for travel costs to/from wesleyan for the entire 08-09 school year (i live 700 miles from middletown)… and i was lucky to find a roundtrip flight to wes in august and back home in december for $250. so by financial aid’s $500 for travel logic, i dont get to go home for fall break, thanksgiving break, or spring break.

  7. Anonymous

    "…maybe for once Wesleyan's on-campus living rule can be appreciated."–> What?!? This doesn't make any sense – you are implying that we are saving money overall by living on campus, because we don't have to pay for gas to commute? Not with Wesleyan's housing costs, not when you could be living for free at home with your folks or for a much better price at an apartment/renting a room off-campus.

  8. Anonymous

    "…maybe for once Wesleyan's on-campus living rule can be appreciated."

    –> What?!? This doesn't make any sense – you are implying that we are saving money overall by living on campus, because we don't have to pay for gas to commute? Not with Wesleyan's housing costs, not when you could be living for free at home with your folks or for a much better price at an apartment/renting a room off-campus.

  9. Anonymous

    I didnt realize such a high % of US college students live off-campus. Wesleyan bucks that trend for sure

  10. Anonymous

    I didnt realize such a high % of US college students live off-campus. Wesleyan bucks that trend for sure

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