Boy Crisisitis in Britain

Campus favorite Boy Crisis, featuring recent alumni Owen Roberts ’07 (drums), Alex Kestner ’06 (keyboard), Victor Vasquez ’06 (vocals) and Lee Pender ’07 (guitar), and Tal Rozen ’06 (vocals/bass), seems to be on the verge of breaking out.

British music magazine NME featured them on its list of “25 Bands Making America Cool Again” (because British scenesters apparently stopped thinking we were cool or something), along with the likes of Vampire Weekend, MGMT, TV on the Radio, the Cool Kids, the Hold Steady, and some other notable acts which may or not have been at Wes in the past two years.

They’re also featured as the Band of the Day in The Guardian last week, in which they are recognized as former students at “Connecticut’s Wesleyan Art College”, and earn inevitable comparisons to that other Brooklyn-via-Wesleyan electronic band:

the music they had begun to make was both ingenious and irresistible: late-70s punk-funk with a tough veneer and a mid-80s gloss, like Duran Duran if they’d come from the Bowery not Birmingham, or Palladium if they’d managed to get their debut album remixed by Justice before they got dropped…

You will be hearing a lot about Boy Crisis over the next few months because they are the subject of hysterical hype and rampant A&R buzz, because they make music based on a shared love of Prince, Talking Heads, Chic, Pet Shop Boys and Zapp – and for once it actually sounds like it – and because they are the hottest electronic pop group to emerge from America since, ooh, MGMT at least. Only, as that list of influences suggests, they’re more funktronic than psychedelic…

Check out the MySpace for Boy Crisis tracks/info. Here’s an Eclectic show from last spring:

Links:
MySpace
: Boy Crisis
NME: 25 Bands Making America Cool Again
The Guardian: New Band of the Day No. 357

12 thoughts on “Boy Crisisitis in Britain

  1. max

    Also on the NME list: AMAZING BABY, with Simon O’Connor ’05 and formerly Will Berman ’04.

  2. Anonymous

    NME is the British Rolling Stone. Neither is a credible music source or rather both are bad jokes. But in fact I think NME is a little bit worse.

  3. Anonymous

    NME is the British Rolling Stone. Neither is a credible music source or rather both are bad jokes. But in fact I think NME is a little bit worse.

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