You’ve got to fight / For your right

Not sure whether or not this is related to the (shelved?) 25-person party policy, but a “Party Hosting Liability” link has been added to the e-Portfolio under “Student Life at Wesleyan.” It leads to a page containing four points concerning host liability:

  • “According to Connecticut state law, you may be held liable for the actions of individuals [to] whom you have served alcohol.”
  • “You should never serve alcohol to anyone under the age of 21.”
  • “You should never serve anyone who appears to be intoxicated.”
  • “You should contact Public Safety for assistance if an individual becomes intoxicated, or if you are concerned about their [sic] safety.”

The page also asks a user to click a “Submit” button at the bottom certifying that (s)he has read the four points and is aware that (s)he “face[s] potential criminal, civil & institutional sanctions” for violation.

It seems like this would be something that’s covered during the pre-GRS Community Standards Workshops (which are mandatory if your group wants to choose a woodframe); any current or past woodframe residents who paid attention, please tell!

18 thoughts on “You’ve got to fight / For your right

  1. Ben

    @Sam: “Their” does sound a lot less awkward, at least when you’re talking…@Justin: Did they mention anything about the other three points, in addition to the liability law? It seems like they’re common sense, but maybe they want to be 100% sure people know?

  2. Ben

    @Sam: “Their” does sound a lot less awkward, at least when you’re talking…

    @Justin: Did they mention anything about the other three points, in addition to the liability law? It seems like they’re common sense, but maybe they want to be 100% sure people know?

  3. Sam

    I think their is technically a plural pronoun, but I personally think that their works better than his/her/hir.

  4. Sam

    I think their is technically a plural pronoun, but I personally think that their works better than his/her/hir.

  5. Anonymous

    i thought “their” could be used to refer to one person easily. is using “his/her” over “their” some sort of editor’s rule?and im aware of hir, but no thanks, im part of the real world.

  6. Anonymous

    i thought “their” could be used to refer to one person easily. is using “his/her” over “their” some sort of editor’s rule?

    and im aware of hir, but no thanks, im part of the real world.

  7. Justin L.

    If I remember correctly, Connecticut’s social host liability law was mentioned at the Community Standards Workshop… but, I don’t think that there was any mention of having to acknowledge (by clicking) that we are aware of it.

  8. Justin L.

    If I remember correctly, Connecticut’s social host liability law was mentioned at the Community Standards Workshop… but, I don’t think that there was any mention of having to acknowledge (by clicking) that we are aware of it.

  9. Anonymous

    I just don’t think there’s any reason to add the [sic] unless its a misspelling. You don’t just add it to show you’re smart enough to know it’s wrong. There’s no reason anyone would assume that you switched the pronouns yourself.

  10. Anonymous

    I just don’t think there’s any reason to add the [sic] unless its a misspelling. You don’t just add it to show you’re smart enough to know it’s wrong. There’s no reason anyone would assume that you switched the pronouns yourself.

  11. Ben

    “Their” is a plural pronoun; for one person, it should be “hir” or “his/her.” I know it’s nitpicky, but I am a former newspaper copy editor…

  12. Ben

    “Their” is a plural pronoun; for one person, it should be “hir” or “his/her.” I know it’s nitpicky, but I am a former newspaper copy editor…

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