Girl Talk: The Aftermath

Reactions to last night’s show were decidedly mixed. Many had the raucous, sweat-drenched Girl Talk experience they expected to, while a lot were underwhelmed for various reasons.

The night started innocuously enough, with entrants separated by sex and thoroughly patted down on the way in. The buzz of anticipation grew as people filtered filtered towards the Bacon Field House and waited for Greg Gillis to come on. At midnight the lights dimmed and stragglers sprinted in. A short surrealist video of sorts starring the Wesleyan Cardinal played on the projectors, and then Gillis ran on stage.

The first song was a shitshow – the front of the crowd rushed the stage as soon as the music started. A violent mosh pit formed on the platform, with everyone trying to either shove their way past each other to grab pieces of Gillis, maintain their balance, or avoid being trampled.
This threatened the sound equipment (not to mention the people onstage), and the music stopped while everyone was kicked off stage by security.
The ensuing delay was what most people complained about afterwards. Whoever had the mic berated the disgruntled crowd for a few minutes, and the music eventually came back on once the confusion settled down, this time with a row of large volunteers (football players?) standing along the front of the stage.This was effective and probably necessary in keeping people from climbing back on, but it was awkward to watch large unmoving guys chatting with each other on stage and obscuring the view of the artist while everyone below was flailing around, and some seemed to enjoy the role of throwing people off stage a little too much even after things had calmed down.
Otherwise, the rest of the hour ran smoothly enough. People danced, Gillis melded all the songs you get drunk to on weekends into a thumping stream of nostalgia, everyone got sweaty.
The Bacon Field House looked surprisingly empty towards the back of the crowd – with better security resources and logistical planning, 1,000 more people could easily have fit in the venue (…though fire safety codes might say otherwise). It ended too soon, and it would’ve been nice to have the kind of swarming integration of audience and stage you’d expect at a Girl Talk show, but I felt like I got $5 worth of a live event.

[Photos courtesy of Katherine Yagle ’12 and Alison Klion ’11]

32 thoughts on “Girl Talk: The Aftermath

  1. Anonymous

    i don’t get it either bud. poor fella also looks like he’s about to drop dead from heat stroke.

  2. Anonymous

    i don’t get it either bud. poor fella also looks like he’s about to drop dead from heat stroke.

  3. Anonymous

    so it was an hour of a guy playing songs on his laptop?and people pay to see that?wtf am i doing in college?!

  4. Anonymous

    so it was an hour of a guy playing songs on his laptop?

    and people pay to see that?

    wtf am i doing in college?!

  5. Anonymous

    12:33, and 1:54, your hearts are in the right place but you have some bad information. First, read the Argus article if you haven't already. It's a good start. Furthermore, there used to be a Winter Carnival, which the Social Committee was going to revive this year. Had Girl Talk not co-opted their effort, the amount of money it cost for the entire event (which is far less than $39,000, by the way) would have been spent anyway. It also would have been a sunk cost to the SBC & Co. because the Social Committee does not charge (i.e. less revenue to diminish the total debit). Oh and you think ticket sales were unfair this time, think about a fair way to give out 1,500 tickets! Ha, good luck. Continuing on, Financial Aid's budget is almost entirely funded by annual UR gifts-NOT the University's operating budget nor tuition. What the University does or doesn't spend money on elsewhere only indirectly affects Financial Aid (for example, raising tuition means more middle class families are pushed into needing some form of aid).In summation, it was a net debit with or without Girl Talk. But WITH Girl Talk, Over $30,000 was given to Financial Aid. Put another way, an expensive Fall Semester campus-wide concert was a given. Thus, the fact that the Girl Talk benefit also happened to raise so much money was a pure-and-simple added bonus in the big picture. So if you're thinking of this as a business model, sure it would fail. But the facts indicate that it was far from that. Hope this helps clarify a bit.

  6. Anonymous

    12:33, and 1:54, your hearts are in the right place but you have some bad information. First, read the Argus article if you haven't already. It's a good start.

    Furthermore, there used to be a Winter Carnival, which the Social Committee was going to revive this year. Had Girl Talk not co-opted their effort, the amount of money it cost for the entire event (which is far less than $39,000, by the way) would have been spent anyway. It also would have been a sunk cost to the SBC & Co. because the Social Committee does not charge (i.e. less revenue to diminish the total debit). Oh and you think ticket sales were unfair this time, think about a fair way to give out 1,500 tickets! Ha, good luck.

    Continuing on, Financial Aid's budget is almost entirely funded by annual UR gifts-NOT the University's operating budget nor tuition. What the University does or doesn't spend money on elsewhere only indirectly affects Financial Aid (for example, raising tuition means more middle class families are pushed into needing some form of aid).

    In summation, it was a net debit with or without Girl Talk. But WITH Girl Talk, Over $30,000 was given to Financial Aid. Put another way, an expensive Fall Semester campus-wide concert was a given. Thus, the fact that the Girl Talk benefit also happened to raise so much money was a pure-and-simple added bonus in the big picture. So if you're thinking of this as a business model, sure it would fail. But the facts indicate that it was far from that.

    Hope this helps clarify a bit.

  7. Anonymous

    Just to let everyone know–the University actually lost money on this because of poor planning. They raised a little under $39,000, yet due to poor choices during the planning phase, costs quickly jumped north of $40,000. I’m all for financial aid, but next time, find someone who actually knows how to host a big-name artist like Girl Talk.

  8. Anonymous

    Just to let everyone know–the University actually lost money on this because of poor planning. They raised a little under $39,000, yet due to poor choices during the planning phase, costs quickly jumped north of $40,000. I’m all for financial aid, but next time, find someone who actually knows how to host a big-name artist like Girl Talk.

  9. J. LaSelva

    That crowd contained, by far, the greatest number of stumbling-drunk people I’ve ever seen in one place at one time.In any case, I’d say it was worth the $5, and the contribution to Financial Aid was a huge plus.Good work, “Douglas Cannon”.

  10. J. LaSelva

    That crowd contained, by far, the greatest number of stumbling-drunk people I’ve ever seen in one place at one time.

    In any case, I’d say it was worth the $5, and the contribution to Financial Aid was a huge plus.

    Good work, “Douglas Cannon”.

  11. Anonymous

    the douglas cannon as a wesleyan tradition- shows up randomly and then mysteriously disappears and shows up in like the UN headquarters. it belongs to the school- so the douglas cannon is a “front” for the school itself- not the administration, but wesleyan universitythats how I took it, anyway

  12. Anonymous

    the douglas cannon as a wesleyan tradition- shows up randomly and then mysteriously disappears and shows up in like the UN headquarters. it belongs to the school- so the douglas cannon is a “front” for the school itself- not the administration, but wesleyan university

    thats how I took it, anyway

Comments are closed.