Bone Marrow Registry Drive at Exley

Come register your bone marrow to help leukemia victims, this Sunday. No blood samples will be taken, just cheek swabs, and students of color are particularly encouraged to attend:

On any given day, approximately 6000 people afflicted with leukemia search the National Marrow Donation Program Registry for donors. At present, there is a serious lack of people of color in the National Registry, and race has a lot to do with finding a potential marrow match.

In an attempt to help diversify the registry, Wesleyan University’s South Asian Students Association, Shakti, in partnership with SAMAR, is organizing a bone marrow registry this Sunday.

All entries will be added to the National Registry, regardless of citizenship status. Registering will involve filling out a few forms and doing a cheek swab, there will be no blood samples taken at this time.

This event is open to all students, but we particularly encourage students of color to attend.
Please come down and show your support!

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Aaliya Zaveri ’09 at azaveri@wes

Date: Sunday, April 5th
Time: 11am to 4pm
Place: Woodhead Lounge in Exley Science Center

14 thoughts on “Bone Marrow Registry Drive at Exley

  1. Anonymous

    Um, obviously black and white are biologically different, because we have different skin pigments (among other things, apparently, like bone marrow). This doesn’t mean we need to be treated differently in society, but we can still recognize that we are biologically different.

    In fact, it would be *more* impressive for us to say “okay, blacks and whites are biologically different, but we treat each other equally” than to just say “no, we’re all the same”. We shouldn’t need to tell ourselves that we’re biologically the same in order to justify treating each other equally.

    Perhaps it is a construct that there is such a distinct division between the races, but race in general certainly does exist.

  2. Anonymous

    Um, obviously black and white are biologically different, because we have different skin pigments (among other things, apparently, like bone marrow). This doesn’t mean we need to be treated differently in society, but we can still recognize that we are biologically different.

    In fact, it would be *more* impressive for us to say “okay, blacks and whites are biologically different, but we treat each other equally” than to just say “no, we’re all the same”. We shouldn’t need to tell ourselves that we’re biologically the same in order to justify treating each other equally.

    Perhaps it is a construct that there is such a distinct division between the races, but race in general certainly does exist.

  3. Anonymous

    Like it or not, lots of biological processes are determined by ethnicity. Race isn’t necessarily socially constructed; it can also function as a very good screening tool to determine risk for various diseases as well as the possibility of matching a particular donor. If you’re biracial, then either a “black” or a “white” donor might match your antibodies. But if all your folks came from Korea, let’s say, then your best chance of finding a matching blood marrow donor is to find a whole group of nice generous Korean Americans. This has nothing to do with social constructs.

  4. Anonymous

    Like it or not, lots of biological processes are determined by ethnicity. Race isn’t necessarily socially constructed; it can also function as a very good screening tool to determine risk for various diseases as well as the possibility of matching a particular donor. If you’re biracial, then either a “black” or a “white” donor might match your antibodies. But if all your folks came from Korea, let’s say, then your best chance of finding a matching blood marrow donor is to find a whole group of nice generous Korean Americans. This has nothing to do with social constructs.

  5. anon

    I don’t see what’s hard to understand.

    It turns out that if you give black people the bone marrow from white people, they usually die of graft-versus-host, whereas if you give them bone marrow from black people they usually don’t. Here “black” and “white” refer to the color of their skin.

  6. anon

    I don’t see what’s hard to understand.

    It turns out that if you give black people the bone marrow from white people, they usually die of graft-versus-host, whereas if you give them bone marrow from black people they usually don’t. Here “black” and “white” refer to the color of their skin.

Comments are closed.