“Diversity University”, in scare quotes?

The students and alumni behind last week’s open letter about diversifying Wesleyan’s faculty have a follow-up message addressing many of the responses to it and clarifying their intent, with a lot more names signed at the bottom.

Clearly many of you have strong feelings about this issue. Comment away, but try maybe raising the general level of discourse* in your responses?

Read the full letter after the jump.

What is Diversity University’s Commitment to Actual Diversity?

“In occupying Fisk Hall we seek to dramatically expose the university’s infidelity to its professed goals and to question the sincerity of its commitment to meaningful change. We blaspheme and decry that education which is constant with one cultural frame of reference to the exclusion of all other.”

–Statement presented to the administration by students in Fisk Hall, February 21, 1969

As is clear from the statement presented to the administration during the Fisk Hall Takeover in 1969, the discussion we are engaging in today is a similar discussion that students, staff, and faculty were having in 1969.

Wesleyan has two ongoing problems: 1) the university lacks faculty of color in many academic departments and programs; and 2) the university ostensibly supports a curriculum that more often than not excludes racially diverse perspectives.

Granted, the argument can be made that there are many types of diversity; however, our fight today is for racial diversity in places frequently omitted from the discussion: representation among faculty and within the curriculum. Who would have thought that, in 2009, America would have a Black president before many academic departments and programs at Wesleyan recruited and tenured faculty of color? Is it not a matter of concern that students of color are disproportionately taught by professors that do not look like them and that usually do not have an in-depth understanding of their cultural particularities?

Maybe the “change” we seek in the world needs to come first from within the university. This “change” must radically alter the university’s priorities. What does it mean to have a liberal arts education without multiple points of view? Is it only “liberal arts” because of the presence of both arts and sciences? By the year 2050, America will be a minority-majority country with over 50% of the population being people of non-white backgrounds. Broadly speaking, Wesleyan’s curriculum does not prepare us as well as it should for the diverse world we will encounter tomorrow; we need a curriculum that teaches us to engage and understand real difference.

A post from Michael Roth’s blog entitled How to Choose a (our) University states “I hope our visitors can sense our commitment to creating diversity in which difference is embraced and not just tolerated.” While hopeful, this “difference” is not always embraced, as apparent from the anonymous and bigoted Wesleying and ACB posts in response to our last Wespeak.

We repeat, “Wesleyan needs to make a sincere commitment to recruiting, mentoring, and retaining faculty of color.

At issue is the value that Wesleyan places on seriously recruiting faculty of color and supporting them while they are here, as well as the respect that academic departments and programs have for fields of knowledge that are situated outside of the Western European canon. Surely, a diverse faculty does not necessarily lead to a diverse curriculum, but a diverse faculty almost always leads to a diversity of perspectives. People who aim to preserve the status quo often attempt to shift the focus of the discussion.

As we have seen from the responses on Wesleying and the ACB, somehow a conversation on equality and representation suddenly becomes one about “handouts,” “a lack of qualifications,” and “Affirmative Action cases.” Momentarily overshadowing the specifics of Professor Melanye Price’s tenure case are three general questions: Why does Black politics not have a permanent place within the Government Department in 2009? What is the Government Department’s solution to this major gap in the curriculum? And, is the curriculum recognized as lacking?

If it was not clear in our last Wespeak, please allow us to reiterate our point cogently. Contrary to some perspectives that have recently emerged, we do not believe that the bar should be “lowered” for faculty of color. Rather, we hold that there already is a critical constituency of qualified junior faculty of color that either Wesleyan has yet to attract or to retain. Although it seems that Professor Melanye Price’s case is particularly polarizing, the fact still remains that Wesleyan lacks faculty of Black, Latino/a, Asian/Asian-American, Native/Native American, Pacific Islander, and Arab/Arab-American descent. Obviously, the problems in recruiting, supporting, and granting tenure to faculty of color existed long before Professor Price and will continue to exist, however inadvertently, unless the particular obstacles with which faculty of color contend are recognized as problematic and remedied by the institution.

We must call attention to the fact that faculty of color often face the same marginalization in their departments and programs that students of color face in the classroom. Usually they do not have the privilege of working alongside individuals who look like them or who share their specific research interests. Additionally, faculty of color whose scholarship belong to fields that are not deemed academically “legitimate,” like Black political history or Asian-American studies, are often uniquely and doubly taxed by their racial identity and the burden of having to produce “exceptional” scholarship without peer support. Working against age-old racialized assumptions, it seems that faculty of color frequently have to convince their respective universities that they are just as qualified as white faculty members. It is quite rare that white professors receive the kind of scrutiny to which faculty of color are regularly subjected.

Whether or not students, administrators, and staff of this university agree or disagree with the arguments of our last Wespeak, it is undeniable that a problem exists. Wesleyan ought to strive towards transforming its students into critical and well-rounded individuals, true global citizens, by changing the curriculum and seeking out diverse perspectives. This is truly not about brown faces in high places, as Lani Guinier has said, but it is about creating a space where marginal voices are heard and affirmed.

With more questions that demand answers,

Phillip I. Marcus Jr. ’09, Jason C. Harris ’09, Melanie Nelson ’09, Amber Jones ’09, Emily Avener ’09, Elana Baurer ’09, Aviva Tevah ’09, Maddie Sage-El ’09, Ruby-Beth Buitekant ’09, Alaina Elrington ’09, Melanie Jung ’08, Briana Deutsch ’09, Justin Douglas ’08, Molly Birnbaum ’09, AhDream Smith ’12, Schuyler Swenson ’09, Julius Hampton ’09, Corrina Wainwright ’11, Dan Manuyag ’10, Sumana Murthy ’09, Benjamin Hart ’11, Meredith Lowe ’09, Andrea DePetris ’10, Melgily Valdez ’09, Hope Steinman-Iacullo ’09, Kim Denson ‘10, Rahel Haile ‘10, Latoya Coleman ‘09, Tameir Holder ‘08, Jessica Bowen ‘11, Luz Burgos ’09, Jillian White ’08, Katherine Rodriguez ’10, Chelsea Rodriguez ’10, Cheryl Walker ’12, Julissa Pena ’12, Aaliya Zaveri ’09, Randyl Wilkerson ’12, Nick Petrie ’12, Kenton Atta-Krah ’09, Sonia Balram ’07, Lev Plaves ’10, Marsha Jean-Charles ’11, Danielle Campbell ’09, Portia Hemphill ’07, Nicole Reid ’07, Letica Fox-Thomas ’05, Rosa Seidelman ’10, Maya Odim ’10, Latasha Alcindor ’10, Devaka Gunawardena ’09, CaVar Reid ’11, Arielle Knight ’11, David Baurch ’12, Jonna Humphries ’10, Fhatima Paulino ’10, Nyasha Foy ’06, Michele Nichols ’09, Indee Mitchell ’10, Adeneiki Williams ’10, Dylan Marron ’10, Colleen Carpenter ’10, Miles Tokunow ’10, Carrie Schiff ’06, Sara Quinn, ’11, Lucas Guilkey ’10, Gelihsa Arjoon ’11, Jonathan Booth ’12, Ana Soto ’09, Gloria Fanchiang ’10, Sonia Davis ’10, Jane Charles-Voltaire ’07, Sabine Vilsaint ’10, Mike Bolds ’08, Stephanie Lee ’11, Porsche Bonner ’11, Joanna Lawler ’05, Alicia Castagno ’12, Lesley Faulkner ’11, Travis Ferguson ’10, Khalia Frazier ’07, Elana Cook ’08, Sarah Bell ’09, Andrea Mayfield ’05, Isaac Maddow-Zimmet ’09, Glamildi Rondon ’12, David Burke ’10, Jeff Guyton ’11, Amy Chandra ’11, Zulay Oyarvide ’10, Tia Clinton ’06, Sarah Brown ’10, Daniela Gabb ’08, Ada Pinkston ’05, Simone Collins ’07, John Watson ’06, Rabs Hutchful ’07, Roberto Soto-Carrion ’07, Melissa Mondesir ’07, Jen Celestin ’07, Destiny Leake ’07, Iris Jacob ’06, Sheryl Sinclair ’09, Misa Dayson ’05, Jorge Soto ’09, Maya Lake ’05, Jennifer Matthews ‘09

*Note:  This letter has the names of over 100 people attached to it. The majority of comments in the previous post have none. It’s great that people are expressing their opinions about an important issue like this on Wesleying, but it’s not much of a debate when most commenters are anonymous and calling each other douchebags.

If you intend to say something substantial, it lends a lot more weight when it’s labeled something other than “Anonymous”.

86 thoughts on ““Diversity University”, in scare quotes?

  1. Anonymous

    I’m just saying that getting denied tenure is a standard procedure at many institutions. In fact, at a very select few (i.e. Harvard), the majority of professors are denied tenure.

    – # 24

  2. Anonymous

    I’m just saying that getting denied tenure is a standard procedure at many institutions. In fact, at a very select few (i.e. Harvard), the majority of professors are denied tenure.

    – # 24

  3. Anonymous

    # 19, how many white professors have been denied tenure in the past 10 years? a LOT

  4. Anonymous

    # 17, the university IS trying to diversify its professors and recruit more people of color to teach here. We just want GOOD professors. Not shitty ones!

  5. Anonymous

    # 19, how many white professors have been denied tenure in the past 10 years? a LOT

  6. Anonymous

    # 17, the university IS trying to diversify its professors and recruit more people of color to teach here. We just want GOOD professors. Not shitty ones!

  7. Anonymous

    @ #19:
    But is it true? Do faculty of color face the same marginalization? Can we get some facts, or maybe even a quote from a faculty member of color or something to back that up? Where are the statistics to support any of this? We have three examples of tenure being denied in the last 10 years. In that time, how many professors of color were hired? Versus how many white professors? Out of how many candidates?

    There are too many factors involved in this for me, or a lot of other people, to agree that this problem is necessarily systematic and that there isn’t already enough support for qualified faculty of color.

  8. Anonymous

    @ #19:
    But is it true? Do faculty of color face the same marginalization? Can we get some facts, or maybe even a quote from a faculty member of color or something to back that up? Where are the statistics to support any of this? We have three examples of tenure being denied in the last 10 years. In that time, how many professors of color were hired? Versus how many white professors? Out of how many candidates?

    There are too many factors involved in this for me, or a lot of other people, to agree that this problem is necessarily systematic and that there isn’t already enough support for qualified faculty of color.

  9. Anonymous

    ersonally, I find your letter extremely offensive and am inclined to believe that it is inherently racist. Although your main point, prejudiced hiring practices, may have some substance, you do not gives us any evidence that would legitimize such claims.

    However, it is not your intent but the reasoning behind your intent that I find racist. You stated that you find it concerning that “students of color are disproportionately taught by professors that do not look like them.” Do you not see how that is racist? It should be of no significance whether your professor is White, Black, Indian, Asian, etc. What should be of upmost and possibly singular importance is whether the professor is capable of teaching properly and effectively communicating with students. Why should it matter whether my professor looks like me or has “an in-depth understanding of [my] cultural particularities?” Unless I am specifically taking a class on my own culture, this should never matter, and in my case, it never has.

    -Brown Guy

  10. Anonymous

    ersonally, I find your letter extremely offensive and am inclined to believe that it is inherently racist. Although your main point, prejudiced hiring practices, may have some substance, you do not gives us any evidence that would legitimize such claims.

    However, it is not your intent but the reasoning behind your intent that I find racist. You stated that you find it concerning that “students of color are disproportionately taught by professors that do not look like them.” Do you not see how that is racist? It should be of no significance whether your professor is White, Black, Indian, Asian, etc. What should be of upmost and possibly singular importance is whether the professor is capable of teaching properly and effectively communicating with students. Why should it matter whether my professor looks like me or has “an in-depth understanding of [my] cultural particularities?” Unless I am specifically taking a class on my own culture, this should never matter, and in my case, it never has.

    -Brown Guy

  11. Anonymous

    #18 – That is a good point, and I see where you are going. But why are we spending time arguing over what constitutes an accusation (or an “accusatory tone”) when we should just be looking at the sentiment: whether or not the phrase you singled out is racist is somewhat irrelevant. What IS relevant is that it is true, and the University administration should make a commitment to changing it. Let’s agree on that.

  12. Anonymous

    #18 – That is a good point, and I see where you are going. But why are we spending time arguing over what constitutes an accusation (or an “accusatory tone”) when we should just be looking at the sentiment: whether or not the phrase you singled out is racist is somewhat irrelevant. What IS relevant is that it is true, and the University administration should make a commitment to changing it. Let’s agree on that.

  13. Anonymous

    #17 – one example: the letter says “We must call attention to the fact that faculty of color often face the same marginalization in their departments and programs that students of color face in the classroom.”

    How is that not calling the said “departments and programs” racist?

  14. Anonymous

    #17 – one example: the letter says “We must call attention to the fact that faculty of color often face the same marginalization in their departments and programs that students of color face in the classroom.”

    How is that not calling the said “departments and programs” racist?

  15. Anonymous

    I am very unclear about what the debate is. In the above letter, the university is never labeled as racist. It states that it would be great for the university and for the students to have greater diversity among the faculty, and that the universtiy should make a commitment to that. How is this controversial.

  16. Anonymous

    I am very unclear about what the debate is. In the above letter, the university is never labeled as racist. It states that it would be great for the university and for the students to have greater diversity among the faculty, and that the universtiy should make a commitment to that. How is this controversial.

  17. Anon SOC '11

    I basically agree with everyone who said that the main flaw with the letter is that it fails to provide the evidence needed to support its claim. If you’re going to call an institution racist, you need to have more than just “there aren’t many non-white professors.”

    Also, please have the cojones to concede to the fact that your assumptions about Price’s denial of tenure were wrong, instead of calling it “polarizing.” In the last set of comments, the only ones siding with you were those who don’t understand how getting tenure works across the entire country and think it has something to do with teaching quality (hint: it doesn’t, at all).

  18. Anon SOC '11

    I basically agree with everyone who said that the main flaw with the letter is that it fails to provide the evidence needed to support its claim. If you’re going to call an institution racist, you need to have more than just “there aren’t many non-white professors.”

    Also, please have the cojones to concede to the fact that your assumptions about Price’s denial of tenure were wrong, instead of calling it “polarizing.” In the last set of comments, the only ones siding with you were those who don’t understand how getting tenure works across the entire country and think it has something to do with teaching quality (hint: it doesn’t, at all).

  19. Anon

    They did provide anecdotes and evidence. They highlighted Jerry Watts, Edgar Beckham, Allan Isaac and Jerry Kerr-Ritchie’s tenure denial as evidence that there is a larger issue that needs to be addressed.

    With regards to Price, I think they offered as much evidence as they could, considering that it happened fairly recently. There’s probably a lot of information that’s under wraps. But they do provide that she has published through NYU press and has worked on other scholarship, since she continues to travel and be featured in various venues.

  20. Anon

    They did provide anecdotes and evidence. They highlighted Jerry Watts, Edgar Beckham, Allan Isaac and Jerry Kerr-Ritchie’s tenure denial as evidence that there is a larger issue that needs to be addressed.

    With regards to Price, I think they offered as much evidence as they could, considering that it happened fairly recently. There’s probably a lot of information that’s under wraps. But they do provide that she has published through NYU press and has worked on other scholarship, since she continues to travel and be featured in various venues.

  21. Anonymous

    I mean, anyone can just write an open letter proposing any sort of problem without providing any evidence, anecdotes, statistics, etc. The solution to the Pryce evidence getting shot down is to give no evidence?

  22. Anonymous

    I mean, anyone can just write an open letter proposing any sort of problem without providing any evidence, anecdotes, statistics, etc. The solution to the Pryce evidence getting shot down is to give no evidence?

  23. Anon

    I think we all need to understand that there is information that clearly these students are not privy to. We all know that some things are transparent and unfortunately, some are not. With that said, from reading both letters it seems to me that they did a lot of research and dug into the history of Wesleyan and its practices as much as they could, in order to provide a balanced and accurate picture to the campus community. They signed their letter, rightfully so, with more questions that demand answers. Those who think there are holes in their argument are demanding answers from the wrong people. You need to demand it of Wesleyan, not these students/alum. You want the numbers, and stats, and information, you too need to be asking those who hold this information–and that’s the institution.

  24. Anon

    I think we all need to understand that there is information that clearly these students are not privy to. We all know that some things are transparent and unfortunately, some are not. With that said, from reading both letters it seems to me that they did a lot of research and dug into the history of Wesleyan and its practices as much as they could, in order to provide a balanced and accurate picture to the campus community. They signed their letter, rightfully so, with more questions that demand answers. Those who think there are holes in their argument are demanding answers from the wrong people. You need to demand it of Wesleyan, not these students/alum. You want the numbers, and stats, and information, you too need to be asking those who hold this information–and that’s the institution.

  25. Drew

    It seems like the letter writers, though well-intentioned, are trying to browbeat people into accepting an under-argued position. I, too, have noticed that there are not many faculty of color. I have made no racial claims about this, and I do not have the statistics or the will to. That said, these letters are unconvincing and tend to preach to the converted when it comes to the question of why and how the faculty is not diverse. Systemic racism is difficult to escape, and blaming Wesleyan’s hiring and tenure practices is short sighted and ultimately does little to solve the problem. It is not racist to say that. I love how the authors of these letters have lumped all of the commenters together with the few racist ones. There are gaping holes in this argument, and I’d like to see them filled because I, like most people here, substantively agree with their point. But I won’t sign onto a document that sacrifices persuasiveness for an accusatory tone. I deeply regret systemic racism, and I believe that most of my fellows here do as well. But I will not condemn Wesleyan as the root of the problem unless I have reason to believe that it is. From the faculty searches I’ve been involved in (4 in 3 departments), I have seen that a significant proportion of those interviewed have been “of color”. That said, did it occur to anyone that people may choose their subject of study, particularly in the humanities, based partially on their own cultural background?

  26. Drew

    It seems like the letter writers, though well-intentioned, are trying to browbeat people into accepting an under-argued position. I, too, have noticed that there are not many faculty of color. I have made no racial claims about this, and I do not have the statistics or the will to. That said, these letters are unconvincing and tend to preach to the converted when it comes to the question of why and how the faculty is not diverse. Systemic racism is difficult to escape, and blaming Wesleyan’s hiring and tenure practices is short sighted and ultimately does little to solve the problem. It is not racist to say that. I love how the authors of these letters have lumped all of the commenters together with the few racist ones. There are gaping holes in this argument, and I’d like to see them filled because I, like most people here, substantively agree with their point. But I won’t sign onto a document that sacrifices persuasiveness for an accusatory tone. I deeply regret systemic racism, and I believe that most of my fellows here do as well. But I will not condemn Wesleyan as the root of the problem unless I have reason to believe that it is. From the faculty searches I’ve been involved in (4 in 3 departments), I have seen that a significant proportion of those interviewed have been “of color”. That said, did it occur to anyone that people may choose their subject of study, particularly in the humanities, based partially on their own cultural background?

  27. Anonymous

    As one of the more vocal anonymous posters from the last thread, I feel I must make several points in response to this new letter.

    First, there is absolutely nothing “bigoted” about what people were saying in the previous thread, and to say otherwise is race baiting. Criticizing a professor’s productivity, teaching ability, or qualifications is not racist. When students don’t like white professors, they make the same criticisms.

    Second, the reason WHY people aren’t willing to sign their names to their responses is because we go to WESLEYAN, where we know we there will be a large segment of the student body (i.e. the people who wrote and signed this letter) that will call us racist simply for criticizing Price or opposing affirmative action in tenure decisions.

    Third, I want to clarify that I am not opposed to recruiting diverse faculty members. I think it’s a good goal, and maybe we should make a better effort to do so. The only thing people were really opposed to was the flimsy case made for some sort of injustice against Price. This new letter is an improvement over the last; although calling people “bigoted” for daring to defend a black woman’s tenure denial is still despicable.

  28. Anonymous

    As one of the more vocal anonymous posters from the last thread, I feel I must make several points in response to this new letter.

    First, there is absolutely nothing “bigoted” about what people were saying in the previous thread, and to say otherwise is race baiting. Criticizing a professor’s productivity, teaching ability, or qualifications is not racist. When students don’t like white professors, they make the same criticisms.

    Second, the reason WHY people aren’t willing to sign their names to their responses is because we go to WESLEYAN, where we know we there will be a large segment of the student body (i.e. the people who wrote and signed this letter) that will call us racist simply for criticizing Price or opposing affirmative action in tenure decisions.

    Third, I want to clarify that I am not opposed to recruiting diverse faculty members. I think it’s a good goal, and maybe we should make a better effort to do so. The only thing people were really opposed to was the flimsy case made for some sort of injustice against Price. This new letter is an improvement over the last; although calling people “bigoted” for daring to defend a black woman’s tenure denial is still despicable.

  29. A Broad

    I understand that diversity, as it is being used in this sense, is connected to race. But what I want to know, is why our search for diversity consistently stops at that of color lines? Since when did we stop lacking diversity in ethnicity, educational background, sexuality, POLITICAL VIEWS? No, no, Wesleyan. You are far less diverse than you think you are.

  30. A Broad

    I understand that diversity, as it is being used in this sense, is connected to race. But what I want to know, is why our search for diversity consistently stops at that of color lines? Since when did we stop lacking diversity in ethnicity, educational background, sexuality, POLITICAL VIEWS? No, no, Wesleyan. You are far less diverse than you think you are.

  31. Anonymous

    I agree that the lack minority representation in the faculty is a problem. However, these wespeaks do a disservice to this point by just listing without any evidence. Yes, minority professors are underrepresented with respect to their proportion of the population and yes as a general value diversity is important. But why does Wesleyan not have enough faculty of color?

    The letter claims this is because faculty of color receive more scrutiny that white professors, but it does not provide any evidence, not even anecdotes.

    The letter also claims, “There already is a critical constituency of qualified junior faculty of color that either Wesleyan has yet to attract or to retain.” But again how do we know this? Asserting it to be true does not make it true.

    How has Wesleyan failed to retain and attract minority professors? Is there some inherent bias in departments for professors teaching the “western cannon,” that makes them prefer to use associate professors to teach non-western subjects? Is this a widespread problem among liberal arts colleges?

    Perhaps the roots of this problem are more systematic, that graduate programs are failing to attract and graduate minority PhD students. I don’t know.

    Instead of just making unsubstantiated claims, it would help if these letters provided some evidence, as well as the how’s and why’s of these issues.

    Proposed solutions would also be nice. For starters, it would help if the letters provided some comparison to other liberal arts school. Is this a problem just with Wesleyan or is it widespread? Are there examples of colleges that have successfully diversified their faculty? If so, this would provide us with some potential solutions as well as a vantage point from which to understand our problems.

    By not developing these points, however, these letters fail to convince me.

  32. Anonymous

    I agree that the lack minority representation in the faculty is a problem. However, these wespeaks do a disservice to this point by just listing without any evidence. Yes, minority professors are underrepresented with respect to their proportion of the population and yes as a general value diversity is important. But why does Wesleyan not have enough faculty of color?

    The letter claims this is because faculty of color receive more scrutiny that white professors, but it does not provide any evidence, not even anecdotes.

    The letter also claims, “There already is a critical constituency of qualified junior faculty of color that either Wesleyan has yet to attract or to retain.” But again how do we know this? Asserting it to be true does not make it true.

    How has Wesleyan failed to retain and attract minority professors? Is there some inherent bias in departments for professors teaching the “western cannon,” that makes them prefer to use associate professors to teach non-western subjects? Is this a widespread problem among liberal arts colleges?

    Perhaps the roots of this problem are more systematic, that graduate programs are failing to attract and graduate minority PhD students. I don’t know.

    Instead of just making unsubstantiated claims, it would help if these letters provided some evidence, as well as the how’s and why’s of these issues.

    Proposed solutions would also be nice. For starters, it would help if the letters provided some comparison to other liberal arts school. Is this a problem just with Wesleyan or is it widespread? Are there examples of colleges that have successfully diversified their faculty? If so, this would provide us with some potential solutions as well as a vantage point from which to understand our problems.

    By not developing these points, however, these letters fail to convince me.

  33. Anonymous

    Is there anything in the works to take this issue out of the electronic world and into the real world? You know, the one where people talk face-to-face about real world issues. This is a problem. Let’s get past the open letters, anonymous comments, and ACB posts(I mean, honestly…)and try to work towards something.

  34. Anonymous

    Is there anything in the works to take this issue out of the electronic world and into the real world? You know, the one where people talk face-to-face about real world issues. This is a problem. Let’s get past the open letters, anonymous comments, and ACB posts(I mean, honestly…)and try to work towards something.

  35. Anonymous

    after the comments on the last post, i’m thinking of starting a group of “White kids against racist idiocy”

    but rock on, and add your name to the letter.

    peace
    white kid against racist idiocy.

  36. Anonymous

    after the comments on the last post, i’m thinking of starting a group of “White kids against racist idiocy”

    but rock on, and add your name to the letter.

    peace
    white kid against racist idiocy.

  37. Anonymous

    I suspect Wesleyan search committees for new tenure-track faculty are fair (or even give a slight advantage) to applicants who are of color. However, it is possible that Wesleyan as an institution has trouble attracting faculty of color to apply in the first place. The problem wouldn’t be our selection process, the problem would be the demographic of professor that we attract.

  38. Anonymous

    I suspect Wesleyan search committees for new tenure-track faculty are fair (or even give a slight advantage) to applicants who are of color. However, it is possible that Wesleyan as an institution has trouble attracting faculty of color to apply in the first place. The problem wouldn’t be our selection process, the problem would be the demographic of professor that we attract.

  39. Anonymous

    “2) the university ostensibly supports a curriculum that more often than not excludes racially diverse perspectives.”

    Can you please elaborate? What would you need to see in the curriculum for this to not be true?

    And please, the ACB should not be dragged into a discussion this serious. The opinion of most anyone who puts themselves up against the ACB is automatically more legit.

  40. Anonymous

    “2) the university ostensibly supports a curriculum that more often than not excludes racially diverse perspectives.”

    Can you please elaborate? What would you need to see in the curriculum for this to not be true?

    And please, the ACB should not be dragged into a discussion this serious. The opinion of most anyone who puts themselves up against the ACB is automatically more legit.

  41. Anonymous

    my question is, and I’m hoping one of the signees can answer it: what PERCENTAGE of qualified professor applicants are minority? if 10% of good applicants are african-american, and wesleyan has 15% african-american faculty, then your point is mute. there is only a problem if the faculty doesnt represent its applicant pool (and I mean the decent portion of the applicant pool)

  42. Anonymous

    my question is, and I’m hoping one of the signees can answer it: what PERCENTAGE of qualified professor applicants are minority? if 10% of good applicants are african-american, and wesleyan has 15% african-american faculty, then your point is mute. there is only a problem if the faculty doesnt represent its applicant pool (and I mean the decent portion of the applicant pool)

  43. Anonymous

    “Comment away, but try maybe raising the general level of discourse?”

    You are an idiot, Sheek.

  44. Anonymous

    “Comment away, but try maybe raising the general level of discourse?”

    You are an idiot, Sheek.

Comments are closed.