Trial Update

As mentioned in this post, we are covering the Stephen Morgan trial, but using read more links. This is the first of those updates. Again, feel free to leave comments, but please avoid any threats of violence – we really don’t want to have to censor anything. As always, our hearts go out to those still grieving.

[Edit by David @6:24 EST – I realized that those who wish to avoid reading about the trial, but who want to comment on this approach, are currently unable to comment without having to see discussion of the trial.]

[Edit by David @7:55 EST – The post has been split. See above link for the discussion of why.]

I bring you this paraphrased update:

On Tuesday, Stephen Morgan had another court hearing. He pleaded not guilty to murder, as well as to two new charges: carrying a pistol without a permit and intimidation based on bigotry and bias. New charges can be added up until the jury selection.

He also chose to waive his right to a probable cause hearing on the evidence used to arrest him. At a probable cause hearing, the state would have had to show sufficient evidence that a homicide was committed and that Morgan had committed it. Waiving the hearing was a tactical strategy – any testimony in the probable cause hearing can be used in the main trial, even if that witness is unavailable to testify again.

His lawyer, Richard Brown, commented that Morgan “denies hatred of any class of people”. In discussing trial strategy, he said it was “premature” to say, but that they hadn’t ruled out a mental insanity defense.

Morgan’s next appearance will be August 5th.

Sources:

The Middletown Press

The Hartford Currant

Again, our thoughts go out to all those affected by this tragedy.

25 thoughts on “Trial Update

  1. Wes '09

    THANK YOU so much for continuing to cover the case. It is so much easier to find information here than on the rest of the web.

  2. Wes '09

    THANK YOU so much for continuing to cover the case. It is so much easier to find information here than on the rest of the web.

  3. Josh

    Sarah – I agree that if he found not guilty by reason of insanity and he’s sent to Whiting, it would be weird and probably upsetting to have him in Middletown for a long time, but in general, people acquitted by reason of insanity often spend more time locked up in a place like Whiting than they might have spent in jail. I don’t know if there is any evidence to suggest he is mentally ill, and even if is, if he could be found not guilty by reason of insanity, but if he goes to CVH, he probably will spend a very long time there.

  4. Josh

    Sarah – I agree that if he found not guilty by reason of insanity and he’s sent to Whiting, it would be weird and probably upsetting to have him in Middletown for a long time, but in general, people acquitted by reason of insanity often spend more time locked up in a place like Whiting than they might have spent in jail. I don’t know if there is any evidence to suggest he is mentally ill, and even if is, if he could be found not guilty by reason of insanity, but if he goes to CVH, he probably will spend a very long time there.

  5. Anonymous

    I’m Jewish. I identify fairly strongly as such. But I don’t think he is guilty of a crime against Jews. Stephen is guilty of premeditated murder – isn’t that enough?

  6. Anonymous

    I’m Jewish. I identify fairly strongly as such. But I don’t think he is guilty of a crime against Jews. Stephen is guilty of premeditated murder – isn’t that enough?

  7. Sarah

    Well, if he is let go on the basis of mental insanity, Middletown won’t be able to get rid of him because he’ll be at Whiting at CVH. And in a few years he’ll be getting passes on good behavior to take a stroll down Main Street just like the man who murdered his pregnant wife who is up there. Lucky us.

  8. Sarah

    Well, if he is let go on the basis of mental insanity, Middletown won’t be able to get rid of him because he’ll be at Whiting at CVH. And in a few years he’ll be getting passes on good behavior to take a stroll down Main Street just like the man who murdered his pregnant wife who is up there. Lucky us.

  9. Anonymous

    http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/usc_sec_18_00000017—-000-.html

    I’m sure he has some sort of “metal defect”, since this isn’t something any normal person would do… but won’t it be hard to argue he didn’t “appreciate the nature and quality or the wrongfulness of his acts”? He planned it for a long time so it’s obviously not temporary insanity, and don’t the disguise and the fact that he hid show that he knew it was wrong?

  10. Anonymous

    http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/usc_sec_18_00000017—-000-.html

    I’m sure he has some sort of “metal defect”, since this isn’t something any normal person would do… but won’t it be hard to argue he didn’t “appreciate the nature and quality or the wrongfulness of his acts”? He planned it for a long time so it’s obviously not temporary insanity, and don’t the disguise and the fact that he hid show that he knew it was wrong?

  11. Anonymous

    @6 but regardless of his jew hatred, i think its pretty clear he didnt kill her because she was a jew?

    but i do think he hates women, but i dont think you can be charged with a hate crime for hating women.

  12. Anonymous

    @6 but regardless of his jew hatred, i think its pretty clear he didnt kill her because she was a jew?

    but i do think he hates women, but i dont think you can be charged with a hate crime for hating women.

  13. Pingback: Wesleying’s Future Coverage of Stephen Morgan’s Trial - Wesleying

  14. Anonymous

    @ 5

    I would assume Jews (Didn’t he explicitly write something?), but there could potentialy be more.

  15. Anonymous

    @ 5

    I would assume Jews (Didn’t he explicitly write something?), but there could potentialy be more.

  16. Anonymous

    . . . or not being able to “appreciate the gravity of the situation.”

    And if he is found innocent by reason of insanity, he’ll simply be sent to some sort of institution instead of prison. It’s not like he’ll be let free.

  17. Anonymous

    . . . or not being able to “appreciate the gravity of the situation.”

    And if he is found innocent by reason of insanity, he’ll simply be sent to some sort of institution instead of prison. It’s not like he’ll be let free.

  18. Anonymous

    I’m pretty sure the legal definition of insanity is something along the lines of being unable to distinguish the difference between right and wrong.

  19. Anonymous

    I’m pretty sure the legal definition of insanity is something along the lines of being unable to distinguish the difference between right and wrong.

  20. Anonymous

    Planning thoroughly does not mean he isn’t insane, if that’s what you were implying. Could someone explain how insanity pleas work? I mean, it’s obvious that he’s crazy, but how does that affect everything?

  21. Anonymous

    Planning thoroughly does not mean he isn’t insane, if that’s what you were implying. Could someone explain how insanity pleas work? I mean, it’s obvious that he’s crazy, but how does that affect everything?

  22. Anonymous

    Thanks for this approach!

    His plea is bullshit though. No way is a “mental insanity defense” going to hold up in court for him. It seems pretty clear that he did it, and planned the whole thing pretty thoroughly.

  23. Anonymous

    Thanks for this approach!

    His plea is bullshit though. No way is a “mental insanity defense” going to hold up in court for him. It seems pretty clear that he did it, and planned the whole thing pretty thoroughly.

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