Wes Student in “Generation 9/11”

It’s that time of year again: weighing the cultural significance and long-term effects of September 11th. Newsweek published a feature about how 9/11 affected several members of our generation, including  Jared Radin ’12:

The events of 9/11 destroyed a sense of security for this cohort of children. Born as the Cold War ended, they grew up in a decade that saw massive economic growth, the dawning of the World Wide Web and a culture riddled with cynicism. Members of the “millennial” generation—born between 1982 and about 2004—they tend to be sheltered, close to their parents, and confident […]

The attacks brought terror to their doorsteps: “9/11 was the beginning of a new fear in America about chaos and uncontrolled disorder in the world,” says Howe. […] They got caught up in a collective sense of national dread: what next? And that was a question nobody, not even the highest officials in the country, could answer. Now, as the United States marks the eighth anniversary of 9/11, these children are turning 18 and entering adulthood, and they offer a unique glimpse into the mindset of a group of Americans coming of age under the shadow of terrorism.

[…] Jared Radin‘s uncle Paul Friedman died on American Airlines Flight 11. Soon thereafter, Radin lost the political enthusiasm he had begun to develop during the 2000 election. September 11 “made me a little hopeless and apathetic and cynical about world affairs,” he says. Radin, now a sophomore at Wesleyan University and reinvigorated by current events, remembers entering what he calls an “insular period,” without much care for what was going on; life felt grim.

Newsweek: Generation 9/11

20 thoughts on “Wes Student in “Generation 9/11”

  1. Anonymous

    agree with #4. making such a simple and unflattering (or at least frustrating) generalization is annoying, even if you are in the group you are generalizing about.

  2. Anonymous

    agree with #4. making such a simple and unflattering (or at least frustrating) generalization is annoying, even if you are in the group you are generalizing about.

  3. Anonymous

    agree with #4. making such a simple and unflattering (or at least frustrating) generalization is annoying, even if you are in the group you are generalizing about.

  4. Anonymous

    agree with #4. making such a simple and unflattering (or at least frustrating) generalization is annoying, even if you are in the group you are generalizing about.

  5. Anonymous

    “Members of the “millennial” generation—born between 1982 and about 2004—they tend to be sheltered, close to their parents, and confident”

    …and I stop reading now.

  6. Anonymous

    “Members of the “millennial” generation—born between 1982 and about 2004—they tend to be sheltered, close to their parents, and confident”

    …and I stop reading now.

  7. Anonymous

    “Members of the “millennial” generation—born between 1982 and about 2004—they tend to be sheltered, close to their parents, and confident”

    …and I stop reading now.

  8. Anonymous

    “Members of the “millennial” generation—born between 1982 and about 2004—they tend to be sheltered, close to their parents, and confident”

    …and I stop reading now.

  9. Anonymous

    shouldn’t the results of the 2000 election alone been enough to make him lose his political enthusiasm? it definitely made me feel hopeless apathetic and cynical.

  10. Anonymous

    shouldn’t the results of the 2000 election alone been enough to make him lose his political enthusiasm? it definitely made me feel hopeless apathetic and cynical.

  11. Anonymous

    shouldn’t the results of the 2000 election alone been enough to make him lose his political enthusiasm? it definitely made me feel hopeless apathetic and cynical.

  12. Anonymous

    shouldn’t the results of the 2000 election alone been enough to make him lose his political enthusiasm? it definitely made me feel hopeless apathetic and cynical.

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