News on Stephen Morgan’s trial

Stephen Morgan, the accused killer of Johanna Justin-Jinich ’10, appeared in court last Wednesday and pleaded not guilty on all three charges leveled against him: murder, intimidation based on bigotry, and carrying an unlicensed pistol.

However, according to the Middletown Press, the case will be continued to October 20th while evidence related to the crime is processed:

Items from the crime scene and Morgan’s car and hotel room are being analyzed by the Connecticut Forensic Science Laboratory in Meriden. Although officials at the crime lab cannot discuss cases under investigation, court documents on file at Superior Court in Middletown list items seized by police, including a laptop computer, an iPhone, a digital video camera, receipts, clothing, bullet magazines, a gun case and a portable computer hard drive. Police also seized seven spent shell casings, eight bullet fragments, a 9mm semi-automatic handgun, a brown long-haired wig, a Cleveland Indians baseball cap and a pair of Brooks Brothers eyeglasses from inside the bookstore.

Police applied for a warrant to take DNA samples from the inside of Morgan’s cheek, which will be compared to evidence found at the scene, court documents said.

Scientists at the Connecticut Forensic Science Laboratory are not at liberty to discuss evidence they are processing. […] Carl Ladd, supervisor of the lab’s DNA section, said the Connecticut Forensic Science Laboratory examines evidence in about 1,500 cases a year. They also add about 700 DNA profiles per month to a database for convicted criminals […]

“We don’t think about guilt or innocence,” Ladd said. “We give important information, but someone else is deciding the contextual significance. All we would be given is the swab, and we would be asked ‘Is your DNA on that counter? Yes, or no?’”

Right, so it might take frustratingly long to process. But by all other indications, the analysis should provide a very strong conclusion which puts this guy in prison forever.

Middletown Press: Murder case continued

39 thoughts on “News on Stephen Morgan’s trial

  1. Anonymous

    To #6: I believe he turned himself in under the pretense that he saw his face in the papers as a wanted person and decided to end the search. He did not turn himself in saying, “I’m guilty, arrest me.” I believe it was, “I know the police are looking for me. Here I am.” He has pled not guilty, most likely he hasn’t received an offer from the government for a plea deal and I don’t know if he would take it even if he did receive one because it would probably entail a minimum sentence of 25 years or so.

    To #5: Pleading insanity would be a guilty plea because you’re admitting that you’ve committed the crime. Defense attorneys can use an insanity defense, but you wouldn’t plead not guilty by reason of insanity, rather you would try to prove that the client was legally insane when he committed the crime (which is close to impossible) and a jury would find the client not guilty by reason of insanity.

  2. Anonymous

    To #6: I believe he turned himself in under the pretense that he saw his face in the papers as a wanted person and decided to end the search. He did not turn himself in saying, “I’m guilty, arrest me.” I believe it was, “I know the police are looking for me. Here I am.” He has pled not guilty, most likely he hasn’t received an offer from the government for a plea deal and I don’t know if he would take it even if he did receive one because it would probably entail a minimum sentence of 25 years or so.

    To #5: Pleading insanity would be a guilty plea because you’re admitting that you’ve committed the crime. Defense attorneys can use an insanity defense, but you wouldn’t plead not guilty by reason of insanity, rather you would try to prove that the client was legally insane when he committed the crime (which is close to impossible) and a jury would find the client not guilty by reason of insanity.

  3. joyce

    it is standard for a defendant to plead not guilty at the time of arraignment. in fact, a defendant cannot plead guilty at that state. after arraignment, he receives the prosecutor’s evidence against him, any preliminary motions are dealt with, and then the defendant has the option of changing his plea to one of guilt and pleading guilty or going to trial.

  4. joyce

    it is standard for a defendant to plead not guilty at the time of arraignment. in fact, a defendant cannot plead guilty at that state. after arraignment, he receives the prosecutor’s evidence against him, any preliminary motions are dealt with, and then the defendant has the option of changing his plea to one of guilt and pleading guilty or going to trial.

  5. Anonymous

    To #9,

    I’m the one who brought up the possibility of him being victimized in jail. I didn’t choose to bring that up because of its graphic nature or its appeal to those within the community whose hearts seek revenge.

    I chose to bring it up simply to remind some folks – and perhaps inform others for the very first time, as sheltered as many of our friends here at Wes appear to be – that this situation may not have an ending that is neatly wrapped and easy for the noble, upper middle class minds of the Wes community to consume.

  6. Anonymous

    To #9,

    I’m the one who brought up the possibility of him being victimized in jail. I didn’t choose to bring that up because of its graphic nature or its appeal to those within the community whose hearts seek revenge.

    I chose to bring it up simply to remind some folks – and perhaps inform others for the very first time, as sheltered as many of our friends here at Wes appear to be – that this situation may not have an ending that is neatly wrapped and easy for the noble, upper middle class minds of the Wes community to consume.

  7. Anon

    I spit on Morgan for what he did, but I feel such discomfort watching people (who I presume might be my friends) discussing his demise. He deserves to rot for what he has done, but do we really need to imagine him being ‘shanked?’

    To all who read this: I love you and I will never forget.

  8. Anon

    I spit on Morgan for what he did, but I feel such discomfort watching people (who I presume might be my friends) discussing his demise. He deserves to rot for what he has done, but do we really need to imagine him being ‘shanked?’

    To all who read this: I love you and I will never forget.

  9. Anon

    I spit on Morgan for what he did, but I feel such discomfort watching people (who I presume might be my friends) discussing his demise. He deserves to rot for what he has done, but do we really need to imagine him being ‘shanked?’

    To all who read this: I love you and I will never forget.

  10. Anon

    I spit on Morgan for what he did, but I feel such discomfort watching people (who I presume might be my friends) discussing his demise. He deserves to rot for what he has done, but do we really need to imagine him being ‘shanked?’

    To all who read this: I love you and I will never forget.

  11. Anonymous

    In all honesty, the whole debate over what he deserves in the way of a sentence is probably useless – there is a very good chance the man won’t live to see too many years in whatever CI he ends up in.

    His crime is on the list of things that make you a target in prison. Even if he ends up in protective custody, there have been plenty of occasions where corrections officers in CT jails have given other inmates access to those in PC.

  12. Anonymous

    In all honesty, the whole debate over what he deserves in the way of a sentence is probably useless – there is a very good chance the man won’t live to see too many years in whatever CI he ends up in.

    His crime is on the list of things that make you a target in prison. Even if he ends up in protective custody, there have been plenty of occasions where corrections officers in CT jails have given other inmates access to those in PC.

  13. Anonymous

    In all honesty, the whole debate over what he deserves in the way of a sentence is probably useless – there is a very good chance the man won’t live to see too many years in whatever CI he ends up in.

    His crime is on the list of things that make you a target in prison. Even if he ends up in protective custody, there have been plenty of occasions where corrections officers in CT jails have given other inmates access to those in PC.

  14. Anonymous

    In all honesty, the whole debate over what he deserves in the way of a sentence is probably useless – there is a very good chance the man won’t live to see too many years in whatever CI he ends up in.

    His crime is on the list of things that make you a target in prison. Even if he ends up in protective custody, there have been plenty of occasions where corrections officers in CT jails have given other inmates access to those in PC.

  15. Anon

    “Not even cold-blooded, racist murderers deserve to be in prison forever.”

    Yes, they do. Would you rather them be in society to kill again? Morgan should never be allowed out in public AGAIN. and he probably won’t either when all is said and done

  16. Anon

    “Not even cold-blooded, racist murderers deserve to be in prison forever.”

    Yes, they do. Would you rather them be in society to kill again? Morgan should never be allowed out in public AGAIN. and he probably won’t either when all is said and done

  17. Anon

    “Not even cold-blooded, racist murderers deserve to be in prison forever.”

    Yes, they do. Would you rather them be in society to kill again? Morgan should never be allowed out in public AGAIN. and he probably won’t either when all is said and done

  18. Anon

    “Not even cold-blooded, racist murderers deserve to be in prison forever.”

    Yes, they do. Would you rather them be in society to kill again? Morgan should never be allowed out in public AGAIN. and he probably won’t either when all is said and done

  19. Anonymous

    If he is ever out of prison it could be much more than 2. I have no desire to see the man suffer (although I don’t blame those of you who do), but the world is safer with him behind thick, thick iron bars.

  20. Anonymous

    If he is ever out of prison it could be much more than 2. I have no desire to see the man suffer (although I don’t blame those of you who do), but the world is safer with him behind thick, thick iron bars.

  21. Anonymous

    If he is ever out of prison it could be much more than 2. I have no desire to see the man suffer (although I don’t blame those of you who do), but the world is safer with him behind thick, thick iron bars.

  22. Anonymous

    If he is ever out of prison it could be much more than 2. I have no desire to see the man suffer (although I don’t blame those of you who do), but the world is safer with him behind thick, thick iron bars.

  23. Anonymous

    Not even cold-blooded, racist murderers deserve to be in prison forever. Come on everyone, let’s maintain some humanity. One person has already lost their lives from this, let’s not make it 2.

  24. Anonymous

    Not even cold-blooded, racist murderers deserve to be in prison forever. Come on everyone, let’s maintain some humanity. One person has already lost their lives from this, let’s not make it 2.

  25. Anonymous

    Not even cold-blooded, racist murderers deserve to be in prison forever. Come on everyone, let’s maintain some humanity. One person has already lost their lives from this, let’s not make it 2.

  26. Anonymous

    Not even cold-blooded, racist murderers deserve to be in prison forever. Come on everyone, let’s maintain some humanity. One person has already lost their lives from this, let’s not make it 2.

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