Category Archives: Events

Film Series: “Taken”

TAKEN

2008. Dir: Pierre Morel. With Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen. 93 min.

“I have a very particular set of skills … skills that make me a nightmare for people like you. If you let my daughter go now, that’ll be the end of it. But if you don’t, I will look for you, I will find you, and I will kill you.” Watch Liam Neeson single handedly kill the entire population of Albania in search of his kidnapped daughter!

DATE: Tonight, April 30th
TIME: 8PM
PLACE: CFS, Goldsmith Family Cinema
$5

Music and Dance of Bali

From Sarah-Jane Ripa ’02:

$5 Wes student tickets for a rare event – a full-length performance of Balinese Music and Dance, featuring the Wesleyan Balinese Angklung. Green Street is right behind Iguanas Ranas. Don’t Miss – may not happen again for quite some time!

Date: TODAY, April 30
Time: 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Place: Green Street Arts Center (51 Green Street)

The CFA presents: Bennie Maupin Trio

Multi-reed player and composer Bennie Maupin is a profound jazz artist who is at the pinnacle of his artistic powers. Although he might be best known for his atmospheric bass clarinet playing on Miles Davis’s classic Bitches Brew album and as a founding member of Herbie Hancock’s seminal band The Headhunters, he has never stopped testing the waters, pushing the envelope and expanding the language. Maupin has also recorded and played with a wide variety of musical icons including Lee Morgan, McCoy Tyner, Roy Haynes and Jack DeJohnette. Performing with Bennie will be Buster Williams on bass and Michael Stephans on drums. The Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra will open the concert with a short set. Co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Strategic Partnerships. This performance is part of the Wesleyan Jazz Orchestra Weekend.

To purchase tickets or for more information, call x3355 or visit www.wesleyan.edu/boxoffice.

Date: May 1st
Time: 8pm
Place: Crowell Concert Hall
Cost: $18 for general admission, $16 for seniors and non-Wesleyan students; $6 for Wesleyan students

“I Open My Books”: An Open House Celebrating Robin Price, Printer and Publisher

In conjunction with the 25th anniversary of Robin Price‘s  press, there will be an open house in Special Collections & Archives, Monday, May 3, 4-6 p.m.  Price is an internationally known book artist and fine press printer, who is based in Middletown.  Her work is the subject of the current exhibition at the Davison Art Center, Counting on Chance: 25 Years of Artist’s Books by Robin Price, Printer.  Works by her mentors and students are on display in the Olin Library exhibition area.  This open house offers an opportunity for hands-on reading and viewing of Price’s work, as well as a chance to chat with the artist.  Please share this with your friends.

For further information, please contact Special Collections & Archives at x3864 or at sca(at)wesleyan(dot)edu

Date:    May 3
Time:    4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Place:    Special Collections and Archives

Quantum Mechanics & Free Will

Carl T. West ’11 writes:

Quantum Mechanics has lead to a rejection of the “clockwork universe” world view and offers a restored place for free will.  We will begin with a brief talk by Carl T. West on some foundational elements of QM and their relation to determinism / free will, followed by open discussion.

The event is intended to help engage non-scientists and scientists in discourse on non-technological subjects of mutual interest, or just to give you an opportunity to learn some cool physics!  Consequently, the talk will involve *no mathematics* and presume no philosophical or theological background.

Date:    May 2
Time:    3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Place:    Exley Science Center basement, room 58 (there will be signs from the lobby)

Children in the Fields: The hidden problem of child labor in America

Sophie Ackoff ’11 writes:

WesFRESH presents another event for their week of food politics, this time on farm worker justice:

Hundreds of thousands of children work in agriculture throughout the U.S.  Child farmworkers as young as twelve often work twelve- and fourteen-hour days under dangerous and grueling conditions.  They risk pesticide poisoning, injuries, and suffer fatalities at five times the rate of children working in other jobs.  As a result of their long hours, they drop out of school at alarming rates.  Nationally, barely half graduate from high school.

Although agriculture is one of the most dangerous occupations in the U.S., child farmworkers are exempt from the legal protections granted to all other working children in the U.S.  This briefing will give you an overview of these issues by Human Rights Watch as well as an opportunity to sign a letter addressed to local Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro urging her support of the Children’s Act for Responsible Employment (CARE Act, HR 3564), legislation that would greatly improve the lives of children in the fields.

Date:    April 30
Time:    4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Place:    Usdan 110

Pangea Night Market

Aditi Shivaramakrishnan ’12 writes:

PANGEA Night Market – your favorite springtime end-of-semester staple – is back!

Come enjoy this authentic open-air market featuring delicious snacks from around the world and live entertainment, proudly brought to you by Wesleyan student groups.

Bring cash! All profits will go to SEALNet‘s summer projects in Southeast Asia.

Facebook event here.

Date:    April 30
Time:    6:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Place:    Usdan Courtyard (Beckham Hall if it rains)

Professor Claire Potter “Re-Thinking Feminism’s Sex Wars: Theorizing Male Violence in the Age of Reagan”

Radical feminist struggles over sexuality generated what have come to be seen as the “feminist sex wars”? of the 1970s and 1980s.  Professor Claire Potter examines the theoretical, ethical and historical dimensions of these wars, asking in particular how the sex wars and the political history of the Reagan era might be made relevant to, and illuminate, each other. Professor Potter argues that critical questions about the nature of violence in the late Cold War United States, the legacy of the Vietnam War, the emergence or capture of radical anti- war activists like Jane Alpert, and the disappearance of boundaries between the military and society — are also critical concerns for a history of radical feminism. Her lecture focuses on activists whose paths to feminism came through the peace and civil rights movements, and not through women’s liberation.

Claire Potter is Professor of History and the American Studies Program at Wesleyan University.  She is author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture, and is completing a history of the sex wars entitled Sexual Revolutions; Feminism, the Reagan Revolution and the Politics of Pornography, 1968-1990.  Her article on “Queer Hoover” was awarded the Audre Lord Prize for best article in 2007-2008.  Professor Potter received her BA in English From Yale and an MA and PhD in History from New York University.

Date:    May 3
Time:    8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Place:    The Russell House

The Sister Spit Road Show

Susanna Myrseth ’10 writes:

Celebrate your May Day with the legendary queer performance art gang, Sister Spit, a multimedia explosion of influential zinesters, fashion plates, slam poets, novelists, performance artists, poets and fancy scribblers!

This 2010 tour features queer luminary Michelle Tea, legendary trans film director, screenwriter and former tribe 8 guitarist Silas Howard, queer graphic novelist and anti-racist activist Elisha Lim, spoken word pioneer and slam poet Regie Cabico, trans psychic memoirist Len Plass, queer zinester/portraitist/graphic novelist Nicole J. Georges, and Power Point loving shape-shifter translady Annie Danger!

Brought to you through the support of the Zombie Art Collective, APRIL, the Queer/Trans Collective, the Adelphic Education Fund, the Emergence Infoshop Collective, Writing Hall, SALD, Invisible Men, Spectrum, Stethoscope Press, WestCo, the UOC, the QRC & SART

Date:    May 1
Time:    9:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Place:    The Memorial Chapel