We Are Wesleyan

Are you Wesleyan?

Do you contemplate infinity for the fun of it? I don’t know how much of us actually do because the administration doesn’t keep stats on it, but there’s plenty they do keep.

The Class of 2014 Profile is out, detailing aspects of those admitted to the Class of 2014 on the front and those enrolled in 2010-2014 for the first year on the back.  Averaging out the Classes of 2011-2014, here’s what the Wesleyan population looks like:

Click here to view the PDF version because the site keeps unformatting the table here.

If you’re too lazy to view the document, it says that the Wesleyan student is a Caucasian female from the Mid-Atlantic who went to public school but is rich enough to pay full tuition.  She’s taken Calc, Bio, Chem, Physics, and 4 years of a foreign language.  She was in the top 10% of her high school class and scored 700 on each section of her SATs.  She is Wesleyan.  Or no, not necessarily.  There’s plenty of people who fit the description on campus, but not necessarily.  Simply skim the PDF to get a better view of the Wesleyan population.

Disclaimer: These statistics are by no means scientific.  I simply averaged the listed statistics for the 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 class years.   Since the source document only profiles what the class years looked like for their first year, it doesn’t account for transfers in and out.  Also, I’m not exactly a math genius so there’s probably mistakes which I’ll fix if you point them out in the comments.

Here’s what I thought was interesting:

  • The percentage of Caucasians isn’t listed.  All the other groups, lumped together as “Student of Color,” are.  If there’s 33.25% SOCs, there are 66.75% Caucasians and ‘others.’
  • Wesleyan is in New England, but largest geographic region that the student body draws from is the Mid-Atlantic.
  • 10% of students reside outside the United States, but only 7.5% are International Students.
  • The Office of Admission screened 10,657 applications last year to end up with 750 matriculating students.  That’s 7% of all applicants.  That’s a lot of work.

[Office of Admission 2014 Profile]

8 thoughts on “We Are Wesleyan

  1. anon

    the stat that the 750 out of 10,000+ applicants will be matriculating is confusing because it makes it seem like the acceptance rate is 7%, when in fact this number doesn’t account for students who were accepted, but chose to go elsewhere.

  2. anon

    the stat that the 750 out of 10,000+ applicants will be matriculating is confusing because it makes it seem like the acceptance rate is 7%, when in fact this number doesn’t account for students who were accepted, but chose to go elsewhere.

  3. anon

    One obvious issue with your numbers: you can’t take the mean of multiple means. Each class size is different, so each class size contributes differently to the total mean.
    Example:
    Group One – 1,2,3
    Mean Group One – 2

    Group Two – 8,9,10,11,12
    Mean Group Two – 10

    Mean Group One + Group Two – (1+2+3+8+9+10+11+12)/8 = 7

    If you were to simple average the averages, you would think that the total mean is six. However, the second group is bigger and disproportionately affects the mean.

    To get accurate numbers, simply multiply each individual mean out by the number of students per year to get your numerator and divide by the total number of students.

    Okay, and now I go back to work…

  4. anon

    One obvious issue with your numbers: you can’t take the mean of multiple means. Each class size is different, so each class size contributes differently to the total mean.
    Example:
    Group One – 1,2,3
    Mean Group One – 2

    Group Two – 8,9,10,11,12
    Mean Group Two – 10

    Mean Group One + Group Two – (1+2+3+8+9+10+11+12)/8 = 7

    If you were to simple average the averages, you would think that the total mean is six. However, the second group is bigger and disproportionately affects the mean.

    To get accurate numbers, simply multiply each individual mean out by the number of students per year to get your numerator and divide by the total number of students.

    Okay, and now I go back to work…

  5. Syed Post author

    The source, titled as the Class of 2014 Profile, details stats for the classes of 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 individually. The figures listed in this post are the averages of the figures for the classes of 2011 through 2014 (the classes currently enrolled at Wesleyan as undergraduates).

  6. Syed

    The source, titled as the Class of 2014 Profile, details stats for the classes of 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 individually. The figures listed in this post are the averages of the figures for the classes of 2011 through 2014 (the classes currently enrolled at Wesleyan as undergraduates).

  7. johnwesley

    it’s not clear to what the big red footnote at the bottom of the stats is referring since there is no corresponding red asterisk (or any other color asterisk) in the accompanying post. The title implies that these are averages for all four classes, but the footnote suggests not. What gives?

  8. johnwesley

    it’s not clear to what the big red footnote at the bottom of the stats is referring since there is no corresponding red asterisk (or any other color asterisk) in the accompanying post. The title implies that these are averages for all four classes, but the footnote suggests not. What gives?

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