Please Excuse My Uninformed Opinion: NYT’s DealBook on a certain kind of Campus Recruiting

So, I’m a senior. And as part of this aging species of college student, I have to think about life after Wesleyan, which typically involves a series of questions that include: “Where can I get a job?”, “What is my survival rate going off this spending pattern?”, and because I’m an international student, “If I can get Mitch Belkin ’12 drunk enough to marry me, does gay marriage include green-card privileges?” (Probably not) 

But the focal point of these inquiries is always the Job. And indeed, the Job is a hard thing to talk about these days, what with the economic downturn and all. This is especially so with ill-advisedly idealistic folk as myself, because it seems that the only damn jobs available are those being offered by the likes of JPMorgan, Morgan Stanley, and related others – which may or may not be the sort of entities exacerbating the economic downturn in the first place.

And this, of course, is problematic. Because whatever sharp minds we have are being structurally plucked to serve those companies instead of being propelled to do something socially productive, like getting the country out of this economic shithole or ameliorating inequality in America’s many decaying cities. The CRC, for all the resignation and melancholia that seems to go into their laconic service to help us with the job hunt, only serves to facilitate this farming process.

Now, this is an extremely amateur opinion, because I am nothing more (as I am told by this country day in and day out) than a momentary immigrant, but I don’t think the problem is that there aren’t good, socially productive jobs out there. I think it’s that we’re not able to reach out to them well enough, and they can’t reach out to us well enough. And the only entities that can bridge the communications gap are precisely things like I-Banks, which often hit student bodies early and hard, capitalizing on the fear of the current jobs situation and roping in frightened, but bright, young minds.

It is my feeling – and I have no empirical evidence for this – that the way the moral terrain of the job market is laid out is nothing more than an illusory veil. There are probably other forms of financially-friendly  jobs out there; given the size of this country, I am pretty certain of this. They just seem so far away, like the distance in the dark.

And the I-Banks – they’re packing flashlights. Click here for the NYT DealBook piece that triggered this rant.

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4 thoughts on “Please Excuse My Uninformed Opinion: NYT’s DealBook on a certain kind of Campus Recruiting

  1. pajamas

    OK, great link, but PLEASE stop with the rambling nonsense all the time. We want info/links, not weird personal commentary.

  2. SAS

    This is exactly how I, a fellow aging species of college student, feel. As far as I can tell, the Wesleyan career center has a strong focus on non-profits and finance/econ jobs, but few resources for anything in between. I understand that it takes time to build up connections to different job fields, but for me even something so simple as a career open house where seniors are introduced to many different possible industries or careers would be incredibly helpful in pushing aside the illusory veil that you mention. 

  3. SAS

    This is exactly how I, a fellow aging species of college student, feel. As far as I can tell, the Wesleyan career center has a strong focus on non-profits and finance/econ jobs, but few resources for anything in between. I understand that it takes time to build up connections to different job fields, but for me even something so simple as a career open house where seniors are introduced to many different possible industries or careers would be incredibly helpful in pushing aside the illusory veil that you mention. 

  4. LRB

    Every college, not just elite universities and liberal arts colleges, should offer more options. Corporate and finance jobs are shoved in our faces, and other organizations without the time and money to do heavy recruiting are ignored. It’s easy in this kind of economic climate to fear for your financial well-being and take a high-paying job. But there are jobs that pay living wages that don’t require a compromise of ideals, and these should be pushed just as hard or harder on college campuses. If that means that career offices like the CRC must do some extra work to find these jobs, well, that seems like exactly what they’re there for.

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