Category Archives: Events

Not Afraid of Darwin or Christ

darwin and christ

Erin Chase ’15 writes in about this WesFest even taking place over the interwebs tonight:

You are invited to participate in a WesFest Webinar with Princeton
Theological Seminary: “Can science and religion coexist? Should
Christians be afraid of Darwin or scientists afraid of Christ? We will
tackle these and other provocative questions in a webinar with two
dynamic professors who are currently fellows at the Center of
Theological Inquiry in Princeton.” For more info, visit this page.

Dessert will be served!

Place: Judd 116
Date: Tonight, April 17
Time: 7-9 pm
Price: Free

Deaf Jam Film Screening

Deaf Jam

Join Sign Language House for pizza and a movie! Holly Everett ’15 signs writes in:

In Deaf Jam, Aneta Brodski seizes the day. She is a deaf teen
introduced to American Sign Language (ASL) Poetry, who then boldly
enters the spoken word slam scene. In a wondrous twist, Aneta, an
Israeli immigrant living in the Queens section of New York City,
eventually meets Tahani, a hearing Palestinian slam poet. The two
women embark on a collaboration/performance duet – creating a new form
of slam poetry that speaks to both the hearing and the Deaf. Prefrosh and families welcome! Click here for more information about the film and check out the event on Facebook. Sponsored by Sign Language House & SALD

Date: Wednesday, April 17th
Time: 7 PM – 9 PM
Place: Shanklin 107
Cost: Free Pizza

Author Lydia Davis at Russell House Tonight

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Hey! This is tonight! The cat may or may not take part.

Come to Russell House this Wednesday, April 17th, 2013 to see author Lydia Davis, the 2013 Millett Writing Fellow, presented by Writing at Wesleyan and The Russell House Series

Lydia Davis is the author, most recently, of The Collected Stories; a new translation of Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, and a chapbook entitled The Cows. She is currently putting together a new volume of stories, translating the very short stories of the Dutch writer A. L. Snijders, and adapting an 1898 English children’s classic for contemporary readers. She has received many awards, among them a 1997 fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation and a 2003 MacArthur Fellowship.

Date: Tonight, Wednesday, April 17th, 2013
Time: 8 PM
Place: Russell House (350 High Street)
Information:  Russellhouse(at)wesleyan(dot)edu

MINDS Faculty Panel on Stigma of Mental Illness

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Great MINDS think alike… on mental illness? Ha? Take it away, Alicia Gansley ’15:

Join MINDS for a panel on the stigma of mental illness featuring Wesleyan faculty and local health professionals. The event will begin with a short introduction by each of our speakers followed by an informal Q&A moderated by MINDS founder, Raghu Appasani ’12.

Speakers:

  • Dr. Matthew Kurtz, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience
  • Dr. Jennifer D’Andrea, Director of Counseling and Psychological Services at Wesleyan Univeristy (CAPS)

FREE SNACKS FROM HAVELI in Middletown will be served! Bring your prefrosh!!
Funded by SALD.

Date: Thursday, April 18th, 2013
Time: 7 PM
Place: Fisk Hall 302
Cost: Free! And with free food!

Chinese Cultural Society Lecture Series: “Legacies of the May Fourth Movement”

From Meiyi Cheng ’13:

Many of you have learned how amazing Professor Vera Schwarcz is at Wesleyan Thinks Big, yes, she’s giving another talk this week!

Chinese Cultural Society presents:
“Legacies of the May Fourth Movement”
by Vera Schwarcz
Professor of History, East Asian Studies
Wednesday April 17, 4:30 pm, Judd 116

The May Fourth Movement in China on May 4, 1919 was a monumental, anti-imperialist, cultural and political movement growing out of student demonstration in Beijing, protesting the government’s weak response to the Versailles Treaty, especially regarding the Shandong Problem. This was the first time in Chinese modern history when nationalist, anti-colonialist movements shifted towards the populist bases, who were inspired, directed by intellectual elites. The main participants were young students, advocating patriotic, modern ideals of “enlightenment”, “national salvation”, “liberty, democracy and science” while pushing to disengage themselves from bonds to authority. The May Fourth Movement opened an era of Chinese Renaissance with an intense focus on rationalism, science and experimentation. Western ideals such as liberalism and communism were introduced. The Chinese Communist Party was established. Yet certain radical cultural, political attitudes eroded many positive elements of Chinese traditional society.

The influence of the May Fourth Movement extended for generations. On June 4, 1989, young students radically protested against political authorities for democracy and the rule of law. This event, known as the Tiananmen Square Incident, was intimately connected to the May Fourth Movement yet failed to bring ideal reforms to the country.

In contrast, what did students do in the May Fourth Movement to actively find a direction towards that the people could refine the society? Where did the seeds of radicalism come from? And in the context of modern Chinese society, how do we understand the significance of the sudden emergence of public political space as was brought up by the May Fourth Movement? Indeed what can be done?

Come join us!

Date: Today, April 17th
Time: 4:30pm
Place: Judd 116
Cost: The cost of FREEDOM
Facebook Event: Link.

Recycled Art Competition

Sustainability guru Kate Weiner ’15 wants you to turn trash into rad art:

Got toilet paper rolls?recycled art
Milk cartons? Egg cartons?
Kumbucha bottles?!

Turn your old recyclables into beautiful works of art at the WesSustainability’s first Recycled Art Competition. This event, in conjunction with the Office of Sustainability and the College of the Environment, will be one of the first Earth- related events of Earth Week. At our table by the Wesleyan Farmer’s Market, you will have the opportunity to build sculptures and costumes out of recycled materials. Building tools will be provided, so all you need to bring is your creativity! Finished pieces will be displayed around campus.

We encourage RA’s and HM’s to participate in the competition as a hall/house program.

Though we will provide some collected recyclables, we could always use more. Feel free to save recyclables throughout the week and bring them to the event.

Any questions? Email the Sustainability Interns at Wesustainability(at)gmail(dot)com!

Date: Friday, April 19th
Time: Noon – 5 PM
Place: Usdan Lawn and Huss Courtyard
Facebok: Link

Mabuhay

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Get yr culture on. From the awesomely named Tess Pei Lemon ’14:

Come to Mabuhay – the Asian/Asian American Culture Show held annually
during WesFest!!!

Support your peers and friends as they perform a variety of
traditional and modern acts including dancing, singing, spoken word,
and much, much more!

YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS IT!!!

Tickets are on sale now at the box office for $5. All proceeds go to
Liberty in North Korea and Brighter Dawns.

Doors open at 5:45pm

Date: Today, Wednesday, April 17th
Time: 5:45 pm  – 8:00 pm
Place: Crowell Concert Hall
Cost: $5

Design Talks: Conversations with TypeClub, 2013

DesignTalks

Lisa Sy sez:

This Friday, join TypeClub for an early afternoon of TED-style talks relating to design.

This years speakers include:

Sewon Kang ’14, “Political Art During the Occupy Movement & More”
Lisa Sy ’13, “On the Grid”
Sofia Warren ’14, “Saul Bass, Movie-Making, and Design”
Ari Ebstein ’16, “Irony in Advertisement”

Typhoon will be served!

Learn more about TypeClub at www.typeclub.org

Date: Friday, April 19
Time: 1:00 PM
Place: 41 Wyllys Room 115

In other typography related news, my design-themed black metal band, Hellvetica, will be warming up the audience before these talks.

Palestinian Justice Film Series: Salt of this Sea

Samantha Sikder ’14 writes in with the next installment of the Palestinian Justice Film Series:

The Palestinian Justice Film Series continues this week with Salt of this Sea. Join us a for a viewing, snacks and discussion.
“Annemarie Jacir’s politically charged feature debut is the story of Soraya (Suheir Hammad), a Brooklyn-born woman who travels to Palestine to retrieve her grandfather’s savings, frozen in a Jaffa bank account after his 1948 exile. Struggling to feel at home in the land of her ancestors — and rebuffed by the country’s financial institutions — she meets Emad, a young Palestinian whose ambition, contrary to hers, is to leave forever. Tired of the constraints that dictate their lives, they devise a plan to reclaim what is theirs — whatever the consequences may be.”
Date: Today, April 17
Time: 8pm
Place: PAC104
Face the Book: Here