An Evening with Terry Tempest Williams

Check out this event from the College of the Environment!

Please join us for a reading, book signing and reception with award-winning conservationist-activist-writer Terry Tempest Williams, author of the environmental literature classic Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place, When Women Were Birds, The Hour of Land, Finding Beauty in a Broken World, and more. Both the event and reception are FREE and open to the public.

Terry Tempest Williams has been called “a citizen writer,” a writer who speaks and speaks out eloquently on behalf of an ethical stance toward life. A naturalist and fierce advocate for freedom of speech, she has consistently shown us how environmental issues are social issues that ultimately become matters of justice.

Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Orion Magazine, and numerous anthologies worldwide as a crucial voice for ecological consciousness and social change.

In 2006, Williams received the Robert Marshall Award from The Wilderness Society, their highest honor given to an American citizen. She also received the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Western American Literature Association and the Wallace Stegner Award given by The Center for the American West. She is the recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in creative nonfiction. In 2009, Terry Tempest Williams was featured in Ken Burns’ PBS series on the national parks. In 2014, on the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act, Ms. Williams received the Sierra Club’s John Muir Award honoring a distinguished record of leadership in American conservation. Williams also received the 2017 Audubon New York Award for Environmental Writing.

Date: Friday, March 1
Time: 4:30 PM-7:00 PM
Place: Memorial Chapel