Category Archives: Events

ENG 420: Practicum in Digital Journalism

methodSophia Jennings ’16 writes in:

Come hear about student forum ENG420: DIGITAL JOURNALISM, a semester-long course where we will focus on producing online content and developing our portfolio. This writing-intensive seminar will introduce students to a variety of forms, from the interview, to the profile, to data-based storytelling. We will be skyping with numerous alumni in the industry, and your work will have the opportunity to be published online via Method Magazine. Multi-media projects will be highly encouraged.

Sophia Jennings ’16 and Ben Romero ’16 will be leading the student forum.

Date: Monday, January 25
Time: 7-8PM
Place: 41 Wyllys, Room 113

Library workshops for senior thesis and essay writers

"Portrait of clever student with open book reading it in college library"

“Portrait of clever student with open book reading it in college library”

For any lost seniors out there:

The library is offering workshops for seniors writing a thesis or an essay. Topics include finding resources here and elsewhere, discovering specialized resources, interlibrary loans, reference services, EndNote, and more.

Sessions will be offered on Monday 9/28, Tuesday 9/29, Wednesday 9/30, and Thursday 10/1 at 11:00, 1:00, and
3:00 each day. No need to sign up ahead of time. Choose a date and time convenient for you and join a group for a 45 minute info session at Olin Library’s reference office. Attendees will be granted expanded interlibrary loan privileges.

Dates: Monday, September 28 through Thursday, October 1
Times: 11 AM, 1 PM, and 3 PM each day
Place: Olin Library

WESupport International Students

From Elizabeth Arslanoglou ’16:

Are you an international student? Are you facing difficulties in adapting to classes and social life at WES? Do you feel that your cultural norms are different from those in the US? Do you believe that there are many things you just don’t get here? Do you feel homesick? Do you want a group of people similar to you to talk to?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, join us in our New Mental Health Support Group, specifically focused on International Students. The group will be facilitated by trained students who will also be active participants in the discussion. We will be having weekly friendly conversations about issues that concern us, relative to our transition from other cultures into a US college campus. You are not the only one out there facing “culture shock” so come share your experiences and thoughts!

Date: February 23-May 11
Time: 8-9 PM
Place: Memorial Chapel Meditation Room

 

TRAGIKINGDOM Auditions!

10353547_10153095431921177_6367538421406283836_nZia Grossman-Vendrillo ’15 writes in:

TRAGIKINGDOM: A Medieval Skapopera (ska-pop-opera)

Set roughly within the 5th and 15th century, TRAGIKINGDOM weaves the tale of forbidden and feudal love between a queen and a revolutionary serf to the musical stylings of No Doubt’s 1995 album Tragic Kingdom.

We are looking for singers, dancers, actors, jesters, and fools of all
types and backgrounds to audition to be part of this concert
experience!

Auditions will be from 4:30-6 on Wed, Jan 28 in the East Room
& Thurs, Jan 29 in the Jones Room

Callbacks will be Sat, Jan 31

Date: January 28th-29th
Time: 4:30-6:00 PM
Place: East Room (Wednesday) and Jones Room (Thursday)
Facebook 

Typhoon Thai Fun for SHOFCO

SHOFCO TYPHOON

YO YO YO

Ari Fishman ’13 wants you, your friends, and possible pre-frosh to enjoy some Typhoon this week:

Hungry for some Typhoon this Wesfest? Bored and ran out of ways to convince your prefrosh to come to Wes instead of Vassar? Want some 4/20 munchies?

WEDNESDAY (4/17) – SATURDAY (4/20)
Lunch AND Dinner at TYPHOON!

Mosey on down to Typhoon for some delicious Thai food Wednesday through Saturday! 10% of profits go to SHOFCO to support the sassy future 4th grader girls of the Kibera School for Girls in Nairobi!

When: Wednesday (April 17th) – Saturday (April 20th) LUNCH AND DINNER
Where: Typhoon
Cost: Whatever you order, yum yum yum

Not Afraid of Darwin or Christ

darwin and christ

Erin Chase ’15 writes in about this WesFest even taking place over the interwebs tonight:

You are invited to participate in a WesFest Webinar with Princeton
Theological Seminary: “Can science and religion coexist? Should
Christians be afraid of Darwin or scientists afraid of Christ? We will
tackle these and other provocative questions in a webinar with two
dynamic professors who are currently fellows at the Center of
Theological Inquiry in Princeton.” For more info, visit this page.

Dessert will be served!

Place: Judd 116
Date: Tonight, April 17
Time: 7-9 pm
Price: Free

Deaf Jam Film Screening

Deaf Jam

Join Sign Language House for pizza and a movie! Holly Everett ’15 signs writes in:

In Deaf Jam, Aneta Brodski seizes the day. She is a deaf teen
introduced to American Sign Language (ASL) Poetry, who then boldly
enters the spoken word slam scene. In a wondrous twist, Aneta, an
Israeli immigrant living in the Queens section of New York City,
eventually meets Tahani, a hearing Palestinian slam poet. The two
women embark on a collaboration/performance duet – creating a new form
of slam poetry that speaks to both the hearing and the Deaf. Prefrosh and families welcome! Click here for more information about the film and check out the event on Facebook. Sponsored by Sign Language House & SALD

Date: Wednesday, April 17th
Time: 7 PM – 9 PM
Place: Shanklin 107
Cost: Free Pizza

Author Lydia Davis at Russell House Tonight

lydia-davis-e1337668920253

Hey! This is tonight! The cat may or may not take part.

Come to Russell House this Wednesday, April 17th, 2013 to see author Lydia Davis, the 2013 Millett Writing Fellow, presented by Writing at Wesleyan and The Russell House Series

Lydia Davis is the author, most recently, of The Collected Stories; a new translation of Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, and a chapbook entitled The Cows. She is currently putting together a new volume of stories, translating the very short stories of the Dutch writer A. L. Snijders, and adapting an 1898 English children’s classic for contemporary readers. She has received many awards, among them a 1997 fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation and a 2003 MacArthur Fellowship.

Date: Tonight, Wednesday, April 17th, 2013
Time: 8 PM
Place: Russell House (350 High Street)
Information:  Russellhouse(at)wesleyan(dot)edu

Chinese Cultural Society Lecture Series: “Legacies of the May Fourth Movement”

From Meiyi Cheng ’13:

Many of you have learned how amazing Professor Vera Schwarcz is at Wesleyan Thinks Big, yes, she’s giving another talk this week!

Chinese Cultural Society presents:
“Legacies of the May Fourth Movement”
by Vera Schwarcz
Professor of History, East Asian Studies
Wednesday April 17, 4:30 pm, Judd 116

The May Fourth Movement in China on May 4, 1919 was a monumental, anti-imperialist, cultural and political movement growing out of student demonstration in Beijing, protesting the government’s weak response to the Versailles Treaty, especially regarding the Shandong Problem. This was the first time in Chinese modern history when nationalist, anti-colonialist movements shifted towards the populist bases, who were inspired, directed by intellectual elites. The main participants were young students, advocating patriotic, modern ideals of “enlightenment”, “national salvation”, “liberty, democracy and science” while pushing to disengage themselves from bonds to authority. The May Fourth Movement opened an era of Chinese Renaissance with an intense focus on rationalism, science and experimentation. Western ideals such as liberalism and communism were introduced. The Chinese Communist Party was established. Yet certain radical cultural, political attitudes eroded many positive elements of Chinese traditional society.

The influence of the May Fourth Movement extended for generations. On June 4, 1989, young students radically protested against political authorities for democracy and the rule of law. This event, known as the Tiananmen Square Incident, was intimately connected to the May Fourth Movement yet failed to bring ideal reforms to the country.

In contrast, what did students do in the May Fourth Movement to actively find a direction towards that the people could refine the society? Where did the seeds of radicalism come from? And in the context of modern Chinese society, how do we understand the significance of the sudden emergence of public political space as was brought up by the May Fourth Movement? Indeed what can be done?

Come join us!

Date: Today, April 17th
Time: 4:30pm
Place: Judd 116
Cost: The cost of FREEDOM
Facebook Event: Link.