Category Archives: Events

ENG 420: Practicum in Digital Journalism

methodSophia Jennings ’16 writes in:

Come hear about student forum ENG420: DIGITAL JOURNALISM, a semester-long course where we will focus on producing online content and developing our portfolio. This writing-intensive seminar will introduce students to a variety of forms, from the interview, to the profile, to data-based storytelling. We will be skyping with numerous alumni in the industry, and your work will have the opportunity to be published online via Method Magazine. Multi-media projects will be highly encouraged.

Sophia Jennings ’16 and Ben Romero ’16 will be leading the student forum.

Date: Monday, January 25
Time: 7-8PM
Place: 41 Wyllys, Room 113

Library workshops for senior thesis and essay writers

"Portrait of clever student with open book reading it in college library"

“Portrait of clever student with open book reading it in college library”

For any lost seniors out there:

The library is offering workshops for seniors writing a thesis or an essay. Topics include finding resources here and elsewhere, discovering specialized resources, interlibrary loans, reference services, EndNote, and more.

Sessions will be offered on Monday 9/28, Tuesday 9/29, Wednesday 9/30, and Thursday 10/1 at 11:00, 1:00, and
3:00 each day. No need to sign up ahead of time. Choose a date and time convenient for you and join a group for a 45 minute info session at Olin Library’s reference office. Attendees will be granted expanded interlibrary loan privileges.

Dates: Monday, September 28 through Thursday, October 1
Times: 11 AM, 1 PM, and 3 PM each day
Place: Olin Library

WESupport International Students

From Elizabeth Arslanoglou ’16:

Are you an international student? Are you facing difficulties in adapting to classes and social life at WES? Do you feel that your cultural norms are different from those in the US? Do you believe that there are many things you just don’t get here? Do you feel homesick? Do you want a group of people similar to you to talk to?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, join us in our New Mental Health Support Group, specifically focused on International Students. The group will be facilitated by trained students who will also be active participants in the discussion. We will be having weekly friendly conversations about issues that concern us, relative to our transition from other cultures into a US college campus. You are not the only one out there facing “culture shock” so come share your experiences and thoughts!

Date: February 23-May 11
Time: 8-9 PM
Place: Memorial Chapel Meditation Room

 

TRAGIKINGDOM Auditions!

10353547_10153095431921177_6367538421406283836_nZia Grossman-Vendrillo ’15 writes in:

TRAGIKINGDOM: A Medieval Skapopera (ska-pop-opera)

Set roughly within the 5th and 15th century, TRAGIKINGDOM weaves the tale of forbidden and feudal love between a queen and a revolutionary serf to the musical stylings of No Doubt’s 1995 album Tragic Kingdom.

We are looking for singers, dancers, actors, jesters, and fools of all
types and backgrounds to audition to be part of this concert
experience!

Auditions will be from 4:30-6 on Wed, Jan 28 in the East Room
& Thurs, Jan 29 in the Jones Room

Callbacks will be Sat, Jan 31

Date: January 28th-29th
Time: 4:30-6:00 PM
Place: East Room (Wednesday) and Jones Room (Thursday)
Facebook 

Cowspiracy Film Screening

From Rachael Metz ’16:

Interested in the relationship between food and the environment?

Animal agriculture is the leading cause of deforestation, water consumption and pollution, is responsible for more greenhouse gases than the transportation industry, and is the primary driver of rainforest destruction, species extinction, habitat loss, topsoil erosion, ocean “dead zones,” and virtually every other environmental ill. Yet it goes on, almost entirely unchallenged.

Climate Ambassadors is putting on a film screening of Cowspiracy, a new documentary about the animal agriculture industry and its relation to climate change and other environmental problems. This is an issue over which we as individuals DO have control, and as a campus, we can make a difference, every time we sit down to eat.

We will have a FREE (!!!!) dinner beforehand catered by Tandoor. Dinner will start at 6 PM and the film will start at 6:30.

Check out the website here and the facebook event here.

Date: Tonight
Time: 6-8 PM
Place: Downey House 113

Mizrahi Mothers, Wrapped in the Flag: Ultra-Nationalism, Apartheid, and the Divinity of Bureaucracy in Israel, a talk by Smadar Lavie

UVL14317_MisrahiMothersPoster_1110_amHenry Prine ’18 writes in:

Israeli anthropologist Smadar Lavie will be delivering a talk about her new book, Wrapped in the Flag of Israel: Mizrahi Single Mothers and Bureaucratic Torture (Berghahn Books, 2014). The project explores the relationship between Mizrahi social protest movements in the State of Israel, violence in Gaza, protest movements in the surrounding Islamic World, and the possibility of further conflicts between Israel and the Palestinians, or Israel and its Arab neighbor states.

Smadar Lavie is a scholar in residence at the Beatrice Bain Research Group, UC Berkeley’s critical feminist research center, and is also a visiting professor at the Institute for Social Science in the 21st Century University College Cork. She is the author of The Poetics of Military Occupation, receiving the Honorable Mention of the Victor Turner Award for Ethnographic Writing, and co-editor of Displacement, Diaspora, and Geographies of Identity. She is the winner of the American Studies Association’s 2009 Gloria Anzaldúa Prize and the recipient of the 2013 “Heart at East” Honor Plaque for service on behalf of Mizrahi communities in the State of Israel.

This event is funded by the Department of Anthropology & Wesleyan Students for Justice in Palestine, and is co-sponsored by the Middle Eastern Studies program, along with the New Haven chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace.

This event is free and open to the public, and is wheelchair accessible.

For more information contact J. K?haulani Kauanui, Associate Professor of American Studies and Anthropology at jkauanui[at]wesleyan[dot]edu.

Date: Today!
Time: 4:30-6 PM
Place: Judd Hall, Room 116

Bone Marrow Registry Drive

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From Diana Lin ’15:

What if 5 minutes of your time meant saving someone’s life? Wesleyan AMSA will be holding a registration drive for the Be the Match Bone Marrow Registry! Every four minutes, one person is diagnosed with a blood cancer. Seventy percent of all patients who need a transplant don’t have a matched donor in their family. Thousands of patients with blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, sickle cell and other life-threatening diseases depend on the Be The Match Registry® tofind a match to save their life.

Although the chances of matching are 1/540 (or .002%), in the past three years we’ve held this drive at Wesleyan, we have found TWO successful matches and TWO lives were saved as a result. Joining the registry is only paper work and a cheek swab– no bone marrow donations will be taken at the drive. Most donations are non-invasive and non-surgical: they are performed through PBSC donation which involves removing blood from the arm. You can find out what it means to join the registry by stopping by the drive and you can find additional information on the Be the Match website, here!

If you have any questions about participating, feel free to contact Tae Hee Kim at tkim03(at)wesleyan(dot)edu, Hea-Ream Lee at hlee07(at)wesleyan(dot)edu, Diana Lin at dlin(at)wesleyan(dot)edu, or rbhuiya(at)wesleyan(dot)edu.

Date: Monday, November 17th
Time: 11:00AM-4:00PM
Place: Usdan 108

Apply to Work with a Thesis Mentor

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From Savannah Whiting ’13 and Taylor Steele ’14:

Starting to feel a bit overwhelmed by your senior thesis? You’ve been researching for months, collecting information and structuringyour thoughts, but soon you actually have to start writing the thesis.And when I say soon, I mean really soon. As in this weekend (after brunch). But don’t panic! You still have plenty of time to write an honors-worthy manuscript, as long as you get started soon and stay organized. The other big favor you can do for yourself? Sign up for a thesis mentor.

Your thesis mentor will work with you throughout the spring semester, meeting as regularly as you’d like to discuss any and all aspects of your thesis. Your mentor can discuss ideas with you to help structure your argument, look over that one chapter that isn’t clicking, and even read through your whole thesis before you turn it in (something your advisor might not do!). It’s incredibly beneficial to partner with someone who can keep you on task and track the development of your thesis over time.