Category Archives: Events

#JewishResistance: Action and Critical Dailogue

jewishresistancA really cool thing happening tomorrow:

We draw the line.

We draw the line against the appointment of Steve Bannon, Islamophobia, complacency of the American Jewish establishment in systems of oppression, anti-Semitism, the Occupation of the Palestinian territories, racism, xenophobia, transphobia, misogyny, homophobia, sexual assault, discrimination against people with disabilities, anti-native violence, police brutality…

We draw the line.

This Wednesday, Wesleyan Jewish students and the greater Wesleyan community join with over 20 communities of across the country in drawing the line as part of IfNotNow’s national day of action.* Come to Boger 114 at 12:15 to reflect before we take a stand. As a group, we will walk from Boger Hall across college row at 12:45, physically drawing the line against the appointment of Steve Bannon and the normalization of hate and violence. We have seen this before, and we will not allow our leaders to be complacent.

From IfNotNow*: “For too long, our Jewish institutions have spent the majority of their political capital on ensuring that the American government supports Israel unilaterally. Now, that stance threatens to make them complicit with newly-emboldened white nationalists that swept Trump to power on the back of anti-Semitic tropes.
Bannon, Trump and their ilk are relying on our silence as they quietly normalize the sort of hate that characterized the Trump Campaign.

The Jewish community must lead by forcefully and publicly condemning Bannon and white nationalism in the White House. History is turning on this moment.

So on Wednesday, we will once again lead our community from the streets during a Day of Jewish Resistance — demanding the Jewish community draw the line at Bannon.”

We demand accountability of Jewish communal leaders and American politicians. We invite all members of the Wesleyan community to draw the line this Wednesday.

*For more about IfNotNow, click this link to visit their website.

Date: Wednesday, November 30
Time: 12:15-1:10PM
Place: Boger Hall 114

Reading by Novelist Eugene Lim

eugene-limFrom Quinn Frenzel ’16:

On Wednesday, November 30, 8:00 pm, Russell House, 350 High Street, Middletown, CT, the Wesleyan University English Department will host a reading by novelist Eugene Lim. Lim is the author of the novels Fog & Car (Ellipsis Press, 2008), The Strangers (Black Square Editions, 2013) and Dear Cyborgs (forthcoming in 2017 from FSG Originals). His writings have appeared in Fence, Little Star, The Denver Quarterly, The Brooklyn Rail, Jacket2, Gigantic, Your Impossible Voice, The Coming Envelope, Everyday Genius and elsewhere. He runs Ellipsis Press, works as a librarian at a high school, and lives in Jackson Heights, NY. More info at his website.

Date: Wednesday, November 30
Time: 8-9:30PM
Place: Russell House

Theory Certificate Presents: Blackness and Apocalypse

Professor Matthew Garrett writes in:

“Blackness and the Politics of Apocalyptic Imaginaries,” a lecture by Axelle Karera (Philosophy, Wesleyan):

Though to deny the geological impact of human force on nature is now essentially quasi-criminal, many theorists (mostly in the humanities) remain, nonetheless, unimpressed with what this “new era” has afforded us in terms of critical potential. From accusations that what we now call the “Anthropocene” has merely established a hegemony of brute facts at the expense of critique, to concerns about the multiple ways in which the term continues to obscure socio-ecological relations of catastrophic nature, it is fair to say that the many scenes of the Anthropocene are still contested terrains. In this paper, Prof. Karera is concerned with what Srinivas Aravamudan deems “the escapist philosophy of various dimension of the hypothesis concerning the Anthropocene”. Following Erik Swyngedouw’s recent indictment of apocalyptic discourses’ vital role in displacing social antagonisms and nurturing capitalism, Prof. Karera argues that the new regime of Anthropocenean consciousness has been powerful in disavowing racial antagonisms. Prof. Karera discuss the ways in which it has foreclosed proper political framings while, simultaneously, it has continued to construct and maintain growing numbers of both new and old enemies along racial lines. Prof. Karera contends that the “political Anthropocene” (if there is or ought to be one) will remain an impossibility until it is able to wrestle with the problem of black suffering.

Date: Wednesday, November 30
Time: 4:30-6PM
Place: Downey 113

8 to 8 is up again!

8-to-8-telephoneA very important message:

8 to 8 (the student run anonymous, confidential, listening service) is starting up for the semester. Call us anytime between 7pm-7am on weekdays or 7pm-10pm on Friday/Saturday at 860-685-7789 or chat with us through our website http://8-to-8.group.wesleyan.edu/ from 7pm-2am any night of the week. Our well-trained, committed, non-judgmental members are here to listen to your problems (or non problems). Please call us!

Seriously, 8 to 8 is awesome, and they’re there if you want to talk about anything at all. Call ’em! Beep ’em! Chat ’em thru the website!

The Writing Workshop is Officially Open for the Semester!

spongebob-essay-memeFrom Ford Fellow Gabe Borelli ’16:

Writing is hard. Sometimes we make mistakes. But whether you like it, love it, or hate it, writing is a part of life here at Wes. And sometimes it’s hard to get our ideas into just the shape we want them.

But fear not! Professor Meg Furniss Weisberg and I have just the solution! We’re excited to announce that the Writing Workshop has officially re-opened its doors as of Monday, September 12th.

At the Writing Workshop a staff of trained peer tutors is available to meet with you at every stage of the writing process. You can meet with a tutor to discuss ideas for an upcoming assignment, edit a rough draft of a paper, or review a professor’s comments on completed work. Everyone is welcome and all services are free. Make an appointment through your E-portfolio (click on “Writing Workshop”) or stop by during drop-in hours. One-on-one appointment slots last 45 minutes (though you do not have to use the whole time period), and all Workshop Tutors will be taking drop-in students in the event that there are un-booked appointments when you decide to drop in.

If you have any questions, please contact Ford Fellow Gabriel Borelli at (860) 685-2440 or writingworks(at)wesleyan(dot)edu.

For the writing workshop’s fall schedule, click through: