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Enormous Horde of Library Dwellers in Underwear Terrorizes Tiny Tour Group

“I can smell the people-in-their-underwear-ness.”

suggestive undiesThe practice of showing up in Olin Library’s Info Commons in one’s underwear on the Friday of WesFest, and trying especially hard to look studious and nonplussed, has become something of a time-honored tradition these days, and so has our practice of protecting the identity of all participants. This year’s, in my opinion, was particularly impressive. My little group—we had just gotten out of a class—ran over to Olin and, initially a little afraid to participate in the festivities, ran up to the third floor mezzanine and peered out the windows. We soon realized, however, that we were face-to-face with a group in that mezzanine’s symmetrical mate, and that the people there had indeed stripped down. We had no choice but to do so ourselves, except for one of our number who bailed on account of a “see-through” bra. Our reading selections included Lydia Davis‘s new chapbook about cows.

Happening Right Now: A Very Special Big Moth: BlipVert w/ John Welsh

526604_10152762293480154_362154907_nFrom Nathan Friedman GRAD comes this nice little companion to the cofounder of blip.tv speaking on campus this week (that’s pretty much the only sense I can make out of the description of this show):

Will Northlich-Redmond GRAD is BlipVert:
“…a trip to toy town on the back of Venetian Snares’ bike” – Rush
Hour NL
“…hyper aggressive techno that barrels along full speed into noise
territory” – Ear-Rational
“…sounds like Lee “Scratch” Perry getting pulverized by a runaway
freight train” – graveconcerns.com
“uaoiejrghn\]pa;oierjg\0-9injkrg89374ybgjka9-jihna’rpi1==1+” – mom

John Welsh GRAD opens with “Spectral(esque) (LOUD) electric-guitar
musics!!!!”

Date: Tonight, April 19
Time: NOW until 1
Place: 49 Brainerd
Cost: Cash donation
Facebook Event: Link.

Chinese Cultural Society Lecture Series: “Legacies of the May Fourth Movement”

From Meiyi Cheng ’13:

Many of you have learned how amazing Professor Vera Schwarcz is at Wesleyan Thinks Big, yes, she’s giving another talk this week!

Chinese Cultural Society presents:
“Legacies of the May Fourth Movement”
by Vera Schwarcz
Professor of History, East Asian Studies
Wednesday April 17, 4:30 pm, Judd 116

The May Fourth Movement in China on May 4, 1919 was a monumental, anti-imperialist, cultural and political movement growing out of student demonstration in Beijing, protesting the government’s weak response to the Versailles Treaty, especially regarding the Shandong Problem. This was the first time in Chinese modern history when nationalist, anti-colonialist movements shifted towards the populist bases, who were inspired, directed by intellectual elites. The main participants were young students, advocating patriotic, modern ideals of “enlightenment”, “national salvation”, “liberty, democracy and science” while pushing to disengage themselves from bonds to authority. The May Fourth Movement opened an era of Chinese Renaissance with an intense focus on rationalism, science and experimentation. Western ideals such as liberalism and communism were introduced. The Chinese Communist Party was established. Yet certain radical cultural, political attitudes eroded many positive elements of Chinese traditional society.

The influence of the May Fourth Movement extended for generations. On June 4, 1989, young students radically protested against political authorities for democracy and the rule of law. This event, known as the Tiananmen Square Incident, was intimately connected to the May Fourth Movement yet failed to bring ideal reforms to the country.

In contrast, what did students do in the May Fourth Movement to actively find a direction towards that the people could refine the society? Where did the seeds of radicalism come from? And in the context of modern Chinese society, how do we understand the significance of the sudden emergence of public political space as was brought up by the May Fourth Movement? Indeed what can be done?

Come join us!

Date: Today, April 17th
Time: 4:30pm
Place: Judd 116
Cost: The cost of FREEDOM
Facebook Event: Link.

Oil, War, and the Future of Iraq

Remember Iraq? Yes, well, we left it worse than we found it, and Ben Van  Heuvelen ties it in with environmental issues:

Ben Van Heuvelen is the managing editor of the Iraq Oil Report. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, and Salon. He writes about Iraq, oil, and the geopolitics of energy; American foreign policy, politics and culture; and religion. He was formerly a research fellow at the New America Foundation.

Date: Today, April 17th
Time: 12pm-1pm
Place: PAC 001
Cost: 0

The Future of Television: Networks, Content and Delivery

UVL13133_VossVisitingScholarsPoster_0304_smj.inddIt’s the VOSS VISITING SCHOLAR LECTURE *bom bom bom bom*:

Join Tom Rogers ’76, P’14 and Henry Schleiff P’14 for a panel discussion on the business of television. Smart boxes, streaming, and social TV have changed how we watch, while traditional television advertising and cable subscription models are in flux. How will producers fund content in the future, and how will consumers watch it? These top executives will discuss the changing landscape of television. Moderated by Andrea McCarty, Charles W. Fries curator of the Wesleyan Cinema Archives.

Date: Today, April 15th
Time: 8pm
Place: Center for Film Studies
Cost: Free

Jacques Steinberg Visits the Backdrop of ‘The Gatekeepers’ 10 Years On

On Tuesday night, Jacques Steinberg spoke to a sweltering Memorial Chapel. He is the author of The Gatekeepers, a bestselling nonfiction account of the college admissions process that used Wesleyan as its backdrop, but the subject of the evening revolved around a more urgent issue in higher education than just the insane selectivity of the best schools — that of college affordability. Steinberg had recently left his post at The Choice, the New York Times education blog that he pioneered, to work at a New York-based nonprofit called Say Yes to Education that helps disadvantaged high school students get into college, pay for it, and graduate.

Many of the problems he described, he felt, were too urgent to simply stand by and observe as a journalist. With budget cuts, many college counselors’ caseloads in public schools have ballooned to over 500 students. The student loan/debt cycle is a familiar anxiety to many students here, as well as recent graduates, and he described how some graduates in debt don’t pay off their loans until their children are almost ready to go to college.

He reminded Wesleyan students of how fortunate they were, in spite of the controversy over need-aware admissions. Wesleyan remains one of the few institutions in the country that can meet students’ full demonstrated financial need. The question of the value of higher education, he said, is relatively new and wasn’t really circulating at the time that he wrote The Gatekeepers, but now it will likely become a key policy question in the next few years. He said it will probably become important to ask about vocational and differently-paced tiers of higher education without seeming racist or insulting.

BDSM Consent Workshop

This seems like a good combo with Hedwig and the Angry Inch, via SART Intern Rachel Verner ’15:

Like getting down and dirty to Rihanna? Do chains and whips excite you? Come talk about ways to enjoy the kinkiest forms of sex, while keeping it safe and consensual. Also, consider it a meet and greet with your like-minded peers. So whether you like being tied up or tied down, whether you want to be bitten or like to bite, we have something for everyone. Check out the Facebook Event for more details.

Date: Today, April 11
Time: 2-3pm
Place: Usdan 108 (ooooh baby)
Cost: $0
Facebook Event: Link.

Sex Signs Workshop

Sign language for "hot."Want to practice enthusiastic consent without waking up your roommate? Holly Everett ’15 has got a sexy idea for you:

Good with your hands?

Sign Language House wants you to prove it. Come by the house Wednesday April 10th at 6 pm for a comprehensive lesson in ASL sex signs. We will cover words and phrases relating to sex, sexual arousal, protection, and body parts, as well as discuss issues around sexual education in the Deaf community.

No sign language background necessary.

Feel free to come early (5:30ish) for regular sign house conversation hour with ASL pro Karen Warren.

Date: Today, April 10th
Time: 5:30pm
Place: Sign House (64 Lawn)
Cost: 0

Costume Shop Job Opportunity

Is fashion your passion? Can you figure out what sort of theatrical production people are putting on just from the costumes they’re requesting? Do you like puppets? The Costume Shop has the perfect gig for you:

The Wesleyan Costume Shop is hiring!Do you love to sew? Do you need a job? Then apply to work at Wesleyan’s costume shop!Student employees will work to create costumes for theater and dance department productions. This will not only include sewing, but also other types of crafting – this year we have dyed fabric, made masks and puppets, and refurbished antique Javanese hats. Each worker also spends a portion of their weekly hours working in the costume collection. Responsibilities in the collection include checking out costumes to customers, sending costumes out for dry cleaning, and keeping track of student charges.

Earth Month at Wesleyan and Neighboring Insitutions

From our resident Sustainability Coordinator Jennifer Kleindienst:

Wesleyan is celebrating Earth Month during April with a ton of activities, both on-campus and in the community. You can listen to music at Earth Fest, garden with WILD Wes, hear Juliet Schor ’75 talk about “The Practice of Plenitude,” clean up with NEAT in the North End, watch some movies at the Yale Environmental Film Festival, get local food at the Wesleyan Farmers’ Market, plant a tree, and so much more! See the full schedule here!

Date: All of April
Time: All the time!
Place: All over the place!
Free: Most events are free and open to the public.