Author Archives: michelle

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catch me at the usdan cereal station literally always

Ask Wesleying: Withdrawing and Worried

Welcome to the second installment of Ask Wesleying, an advice column about any and all things Wes! Have a question about life at Wes? Submit it to get it answered in Ask Wesleying! You can find all of the Ask Wesleying columns here.

This week’s question is about withdrawing from a class after drop-add ends:

Dear Wesleying,

Is it a bad idea to drop a course in my first semester? Will it be hard to catch up on credits? Will it look bad?

Sincerely,
Withdrawing and Worried

You can read the answer to this week’s question below the jump!

LIVEBLOG: Zach is Back! (And Hermes is Teaching!)

Ever since Lily Herman ’16 (aka hermes) announced that she would be teaching a course called “It’s a Mess”: An Academic and Practical Look at Digital Media in the Late 2010s this fall, we’ve been eagerly awaiting the course’s treatment of our very own digital media of the late 2010s (and earlier): Wesleying.org!

Tonight, Zach Schonfeld ’13 (aka Zach) is guest-lecturing for Lily’s class on the topic “The Role of Campus Media,” and in typical Wesleying fashion, we’ll be liveblogging it! Read below the jump for a window into the fun!

All Campus Email: Police Investigating Shooting on Long Lane (CW: Gun Violence)

Editor’s Note: This story is actively unfolding, and posts linked to in this article are being updated as more information becomes available. If you are upset or disturbed by this news and need support, please reach out to CAPS at (860) 685-2910 and alert the CAPS staff you are in need of a same day appointment. If you are unsure if your issue is a “crisis,” please contact CAPS to discuss.

Image credit: WFSB

Just before 2 PM, I heard from a Pi Cafe employee who received a phone call from their child who attends school in Middletown that there had been a shooting on Long Lane (the road, not the farm).

Alarmed that there had been no Public Safety or other alerts, I did a Google News search of “Long Lane shooting Middletown CT” which yielded the following news reports on the incident:

After emailing Public Safety Director Scott Rohde at 2:11 PM, I received this update at 2:33 PM:

“Public Safety was in contact with MPD. It was determined there was no immediate risk to campus. The suspect is known to the police. No specific action was requested of Wesleyan by the police. The suspect was believed to have left the area going south, further distancing himself from campus. We choose to notify both child care centers on campus, and provided the information we had to the Physical Plant staff who work in the Long Lane area. I sent out a campus notice a few moments ago as an information item.”

Guest Post: Wesleyan, It’s Time to Rise Up for Custodial Workers

“Janitorial workers provide essential labor in our homes, dorms, classrooms and athletic facilities. Our failure to see, support and organize with these workers must end.”

María with her grandchildren.

Some of you may have seen students tabling with petitions in Usdan or sharing a GoFundMe on social media in support of María Sarabia this week. Students for Custodial Workers has written this guest post to explain the conditions of custodial workers at Wesleyan and what you can do to help! Read below the jump for their post:

Ask Wesleying: Local Co-Op, Local-er Hookups

Welcome to the first installment of Ask Wesleying, an advice column about any and all things Wes! Have a question about life at Wes? Submit it to get it answered in Ask Wesleying! You can find all of the Ask Wesleying columns here.

This week’s question is about something that’s on many people’s minds with the start of Local Co-op:

Dear Wesleying,

Why are all of my hookups always in line for co-op RIGHT when I get there? Why are they all friends? Why is co-op pickup scheduled such that I can’t go home and change into a cute outfit beforehand so that all of my hookups see how hot I am in co-op line? UGH!

Sincerely,
Local Co-Op, Local-er Hookups

You can read the answer to this week’s question below the jump!

Become a volunteer docent!

Open Access Image from the Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University (photo: M. Johnston)

The Friends of the Davison Arts Center is looking for volunteer docents!

Every fall for over 40 years, the Friends of the Davison Arts Center brings more than 300 Middletown 4th graders to explore on-campus galleries as well as the Javanese Gamelan orchestra. Volunteer docents engage these students with the world of art, music, and architecture through hands-on activities, and become part of a great team alongside museum curators and educators.
No experience necessary! Docents should be enthusiastic, reliable, interested in the arts, comfortable working with kids and public speaking. Tours run October 18, 24, 25, 30 and November 1, 13, 14, 15 from 9:00 am – 12:30 pm.
All docents are required to commit to at least one shift and attend training on Monday, October 15 from 11:50 am -1:10 pm in the DAC. Lunch will be provided.
Interested?: Email Marisely Gonzalez, FDAC Docent Program Coordinator, marisely.wesleyan[at]gmail[dot]com
Date: Monday, October 15
Time: 11:50 AM-1:10 PM
Place: DAC

Pumpkin Fest!

It’s fall and you know what that means: Pumpkin Fest!

FREE and open to the public!

Grab your friends and family and join us at Long Lane Farm’s annual Pumpkin Fest, Saturday, October 13, 2018, from noon to 4 pm! Featuring live student bands, farm tours, crafts, baked goods for sale, a pie-eating contest, vendors & student groups, FREE veggie burgers and cider, and much more!

Visit wesleyan.edu/coe for more info. Sponsored by Long Lane Farm, the College of the Environment and Bon Appetit.

Rain date: Sunday, October 14, noon to 4 p.m.

Date: Saturday, October 13
Time: 12:00 PM-4:00 PM
Place: Long Lane Farm
Facebook Event

Emily Johnson/Catalyst: Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter

From the the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN):

Join us by the fire for a gathering hosted by Emily Johnson/Catalyst that centers around Indigenous protocols and knowledges, as we welcome the evening with our campus community and neighbors. Come sit and gaze at the stars, and share stories, conversation and food (bring food to share if you wish—hot apple cider will be provided). Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter is a community gathering. It is a way of being and a way of making. It is research and process as ceremony. It is dance. Come join us.

Rain Location: Beckham Hall (no fire)

Kinstillatory Mappings is co-hosted by the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN). It was created with funding from The MAP Fund, supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Emily Johnson is an artist who makes body-based work. A Bessie Award winning choreographer, Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Doris Duke Artist Award she is based in New York City. Originally from Alaska, she is of Yup’ik descent and since 1998 has created work that considers the experience of sensing and seeing performance. Her dances function as installations, engaging audiences within and through a space and environment—interacting with a place’s architecture, history, and role in community. Emily is trying to make a world where performance is part of life; where performance is an integral connection to each other, our environment, our stories, our past, present, and future. Emily’s written work has been published and commissioned by Dance Research Journal(University of Cambridge Press); SFMOMA; Transmotion Journal,University of Kent; Movement Research Journal; Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; and the recent compilation Imagine d Theaters (Routledge), edited by Daniel Sack.

Her choreography is presented across the United States and Australia and most recently at Santa Fe Opera with Doctor Atomic, directed by Peter Sellars. Emily is a lead collaborator in the Indigenous-artist led Healing Place Collaborative (Minneapolis, MN), focused on the vital role of the Mississippi River in the life of residents along its path; she was an inaugural participant in the Headlands Center for the Arts’ Climate Change Residency, a member of Creative Change at Sundance, and served as a water protector at Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. As a facilitator she has worked with artists and communities most notably during TIME PLACE SPACE, NOMAD in Wotjobaluk Country, Australia and during UMYUANGVIGKAQ with PS122 on Manhahtaan in Lenapehoking, a durational Long Table/Sewing Bee focused on indigenizing the performing arts and the world at large.

Her most recent work, Then a Cunning Voice and A Night We Spend Gazing at Stars—an all night outdoor performance gathering taking place on and near eighty-four community-hand-made quilts—premiered in Lenapehoking (NYC) with PS122 on Randall’s Island in summer 2017 and will tour to Chicago, San Francisco, and Narrm (Melbourne), Australia. Currently, she hosts monthly bonfires on the Lower East Side in Mannahatta in partnership with Abrons Art Center and is, with colleagues in Australia and Canada, developing a Global First Nations Performance Network.

Date: Tuesday, October 9
Time: 6:30-8:30 PM
Place: CFA Courtyard (Rain Location: Beckham Hall)
Facebook Event

Lila Abu-Lughod, “Framing Islam: ‘Violent Extremism’ and the Rise of Securofeminism”

Professor Margot Weiss, Chair of the Anthropology Department writes in:

Please join us on Thursday for the Anthropology Annual Lecture with Lila Abu-Lughod, feminist anthropologist and premiere scholar of gender, Islam, global feminism, and Middle East politics.

In this talk, she will be sharing new work on the dangerous collusion between international women’s rights advocates and the global security enterprise called Countering Violent Extremism (CVE).

Check out Lila Abu-Lughod speaking with the New York Times about the gap between popular Western beliefs about “Muslim women” and the reality: https://www.nytimes.com/video/books/review/100000002617743/the-read-around-lila-abu-lughod.html

Lila Abu-Lughod is the Joseph L. Buttenweiser Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University and the author of seven books including Do Muslim Women Need Saving?, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society, Dramas of Nationhood: The Politics of Television in Egypt, and Nakba: Palestine, 1948, and the Claims of Memory.

Date: Thursday, October 11
Time: 4:30 PM
Place: Shanklin 107
Facebook Event

Introducing: Ask Wesleying!

College is hard. From adjusting to living away from your family for the first time to figuring out how to navigate academics to making friends, these 4-ish years of your life are full of new challenges.

I’ve always wanted to start an advice column. Now that I’m in my senior year, I’m taking advantage of my Wesleyan/life wisdom (also being managing editor of Wesleying and therefore being able to kinda do whatever I want) by starting a weekly advice column! Read on to learn more:

Welcome to Ask Wesleying! Each week I will answer questions from students just like you about anything having to do with anything and everything Wesleyan University: social life, academics, living on your own, roommates, hookup culture, extracurriculars, meal plans, and more!

In order for this to work, y’all have to send in some questions! Questions can be submitted anonymously via this form, or less-anonymously by emailing us at staff[at]wesleying[dot]org (put “Ask Wesleying” in the subject line)! All questions will be answered and posted anonymously, even if you email us including your name. Some weeks, I might reach out to other writers or my friends to guest-answer your questions!