Author Archives: Meli

About Meli

I accept donations of coffee in exchange for a randomized article

BOOKSLEYING: Three Daughters of Eve by Elif Shafak

Welcome to Booksleying! If you need a refresher on what this is or how the rating system works, check out our introductory post. You can find all the Booksleying posts here. (We’ve been shit at posting, we KNOW).

Title and Author: Three Daughters of Eve (Havaanin Üç Kizi) by Elif Shafak

NOTE: I accidentally read the English version of the book without knowing that it also had a Turkish translation. Shafak has some of her works originally written in English, and some in Turkish, and I wasn’t able to figure out which category this book lives in. But good for you! You get an English review of this book.

Rating: 4 stars with a side of Dessert Parfait. 

BOOKSLEYING: The Sun is Also a Star

a note: apologies for being such SHIT about posting the past few weeks. we’ve been, well, suffering.

Title and Author: The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

Rating: 4 Michael Roths, with a side of Sweet Potato Fries

A Quote: “There’s a Japanese phrase that I like: koi no yokan. It doesn’t mean love at first sight. It’s closer to love at second sight. It’s the feeling when you meet someone that you’re going to fall in love with them. Maybe you don’t love them right away, but it’s inevitable that you will.”

Wesleyan Releases Regular Decision Letters to the Class of 2023 And HOLY FUCKING HELL I AM OLD

“jesus fucking christ, i am going to be a whole four years older than these fucking CHILDREN”

-me, right now

 

In some news about new people coming to this campus, Regular Decision admission letters were released to the Class of 2023 (HOLY FUCK) this past Saturday at approximately 3 PM.

If you’re reading this, you should be feeling the following emotions:

  1. FROSH: Aw cool! New people! We’re not frosh! (So you thought)
  2. SOPHOMORES: oh man, i’m old
  3. JUNIORS: WHAT THE LITERAL FUCK
  4. SENIORS: sorry, I haven’t reached this point yet. check back in next year.
    1. Probably: how many days till I graduate?

Although we at Welseying are a real reputable source of information on campus, we still haven’t heard anything about the admission rate for this year; but on the other hand, if you’re here because you’ve just gotten in and are asking yourself what the literal fuck is a Wesleyan, we’re glad you’re here.

why is this school literally macklemore

I remember the first full-price clothing item I ever bought. No discounts. No coupon. It was my first semester at Wesleyan, and I had to get a black dress for my WesWinds concert. My mom and I had gone to Zara to check their overwhelmingly black aesthetic, and I found a black dress with a lace top. I thought it was the perfect dress until I checked the price tag. $50. We both knew that we would have to wait forever for that dress to go on sale, and I didn’t own an appropriate dress for my concert, which was quickly approaching.

My mom gave me a look and said hadi, which translates into a bunch of things in English. It can mean come on, let’s, but in this situation, it meant, we’re going to ignore the price because this is a pretty dress. Screw it, let’s buy it. It also meant, let’s do this quickly before my wallet changes its mind.

For most of my life, I’ve been much more accustomed to hand-me-downs and clearance rack finds than full-price fashions and expensive trends. Growing up, my favorite outfit was a sequined denim jumpsuit that had been passed down to me. This was, in retrospect, absolutely ridiculous and marginally over-the-top for a pre-teen to wear, but it was special to me. Our hand-me-down system was cross-continental: my friend’s mom would pass down her daughter’s clothes to me, where I would get some use out of it, and then those clothes were packed away to be brought to my cousins in Turkey, where the cascade of hand-me-downs began again: starting with one of the middle cousins, to the one slightly younger, to the second-cousin-twice-removed-or-what-we-just-call-cousin down the line. As long as it was in wearable condition, it was passed down.

Upon one of my visits back home, I saw one of my cousins wearing a dress that I remember wearing in elementary school: white, with some red, orange, and yellow flowers scattered along the hem and waistline. It was one of my favorite dresses; now, it had been passed down two bodies before reaching my cousin’s closet.

The topic of clothing within a low-income family is complex: a web of societal standards of dress combined with financial barriers. I had learned quickly that my mom and I could not afford regular-priced clothing, so our trips to the Gap consisted of darting toward the sale section, calculating sales tax on each item, never crossing the line between clearance and regular-priced, avoiding lusting over a dress that we couldn’t afford. My wardrobe’s guiding logic was out of season: we bought summer clothes in the winter when it went on sale and winter clothes at the beginning of summer, estimating how much I would grow in the meantime. On the few occasions my mom and I went through the in-season section, we would take a mental note on the clothes we would wait to go on clearance, eventually buying them a few months later. This was our process; we waited for coupons, for credit card rewards, for the hand-me-downs supplementing my needs in the meantime.

BOOKSLEYING: Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Welcome to Booksleying! If you need a refresher on what this is or how the rating system works, check out our introductory post. You can find all the Booksleying posts here.

Title and Author: Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Rating: 5 Michael Roths, with a side of Dessert Parfait.

Tl;dr (except you wr): In a small town in 1970s Ohio, Lydia, the daughter of a mixed Chinese-American family is found dead in a nearby lake. Lydia is the apple of her parents’ eyes, the favorite of the three Lee kids, and their apparent perfect family tree falls apart as the investigation begins. Everything I Never Told You dissects a multitude of trauma: immigrant, mixed, Asian, and uncertainty. The novel follows both the investigation of Lydia’s death by delving into the backstories of both her parents, revealing a complicated story of love, betrayal, and ultimately, understanding.

BOOKSLEYING: COME READ WITH US

Welcome to 2019, where we all decide to embark on a new resolution to eat healthier, maybe make it to Freeman, or actually go to class for once.

Saadia (sdzand I have been exchanging book recommendations for some time now, and after a caps-lock induced discussion, the Book-slying was born/birthed/created. I’ve decided to invest in some self-care by reading a book at least every two weeks, and instead of incessantly posting about the books I read on Instagram, I (we) will take the time to review what we’ve been procrastinating our work with.

But let’s be honest, I will continue to incessantly post about the books I’m reading. It’s just the way I am.

The goal for this series is to come with a book review every week, alternating between the two of us, making each of us responsible for a book every two weeks. Melisa reads a lot, Saadia does not. This is an attempt to bridge that gap.

Read below the jump for an explanation of the rating system!

2018: A Very Wesleying Year in Review

To say it’s been a wild year would be an insult to things that deserve the title “wild.” But, here we are, a month into reflecting and trying to understand what even happened in 2018, publishing this article to try to find some sense. And what other than to write about a year at an institution that makes no sense during any given year?!

Yes, friends, I am going to try to review this very confusing year––and bonus: I wasn’t even on campus for half of it! Because I am perpetually on the Internet, I have been filled in on the ~happenings~ last semester and will try my best to give 2018 the little justice it deserves.

Disclaimer: this is a subjective process, and things change at Wesleyan sometimes very quickly, but also sometimes veeeeery slowly. If I’ve missed something, let us know at staff[at]wesleying[dot]org. Send us your funny moments, your important moments…just all the moments.

Because this year was just…a lot…I’m going to do my best to organize this information as effectively as possible.

If you want to procrastinate because it’s been a week of classes, here’s some old content: 20122013201420152016, 2017.

IMPORTANT: Wesleyan’s Financial Aid Renewal Application Deadline is January 15!

Over the past year-and-a-half, students and administrators have been working together in the First-Generation, Low-Income (FGLI) Committee to address gaps of resources for underrepresented students on campus. (You can read a more detailed interview about the history of the FGLI Committee here.) I’ve been involved with the committee since it was created the spring of my first-year in 2017, and have focused on both financial aid initiatives and academic accessibility via the Office for Equity and Inclusion.

A topic of conversation was the financial aid application process itself, and how it’s stressful waiting until late June/July to find out your financial aid package. As it stood, the deadline for all documents was May 15th, just after the CSS Profile closes. However, due to some changes to the documentation required in the application, Wesleyan’s financial aid office now creates our packages from the previous year’s tax forms (i.e. 2017), rather than the current year’s (i.e. 2018).

Because moving the deadline up doesn’t affect the availability of the necessary tax forms, the financial aid office decided to push the deadline four months up to January 15th, 2019 so they can receive all information faster and give us notification earlier. When searching through my emails, I ~discovered~ that this was announced in November, with some subsequent reminders of the new date.