Category Archives: Art

Apply to Writing and Drawing Comics!

From Professor Katzenstein:

Apply to Writing and Drawing Comics!

This is an intensive workshop course for students interested in making comics. We will read comic strips and books that vary widely in genre and style, and learn to identify and emulate cartooning techniques.

There will be short weekly exercises to get students comfortable working with words and images: single panel cartoons, four panel comic strips, a “master’s copy” of another cartoonist’s work. Students will make a 5-10 page comic for their midterm, and a 10-20 page comic for their final.

The deadline to apply has been extended to Friday, November 16! To apply for this course students should submit an example of work that includes both words and images, 2-5 pages in length to jason.adam.katzenstein[at]gmail[dot]com. In person interviews will take place on Thursday, November 8 on campus, but Skype interviews can also be arranged.

Date: Friday, November 16
Time: 5 PM

The Ankh Presents: Date Night with Antwaun Sargent

From Kazumi Fish ’19:

Join the Ankh for dinner and discussion with Antwaun Sargent in the DFC on Friday, November 9th!

Antwaun Sargent is a writer and critic living and working in New York City. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, The New Yorker, The Nation, W, Aperture, Vice and various other publications. Has contributed to museum and gallery publications and this year he has written catalogue essays on artists Ed Clark, Mickalene Thomas, and Deborah Roberts. Recently he co-curated the Aperture Foundation exhibition, “The Way We Live Now,” and has lectured and been in conversation with artists at Studio Museum in Harlem, Brooklyn Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Yale University, Brown University and various other institutions.

Sargent’s talk will focus on writing art criticism, his conversations with artists, and black artistic voices whose work speaks to questions of race, gender, power and representation. Dinner will be served at 5:30 PM, and the talk will begin at 6:00 PM with a Q&A session to follow.

Date: Friday, November 9
Time: 5:30-7:30 PM
Place: Daniel Family Commons
Facebook Event

Film Series: The Face of Another

1966. Japan. Dir: Hiroshi Teshigahara. With Tatsuya Nakadai. 124 min. 35mm print!

Having lost his face in an accident, a businessman finds his wife growing callous and his life falling apart. Seeking vengeance, he obtains a new face in secret and re-enters his partner’s life. In this far-fetched thriller of unadulterated imaginations, Teshigahara unveils the ruthless make-up of social identities and modern lives.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Sorry to Bother You

2018. USA. Dir: Boots Riley. With Lakeith Stanfield, Tessa Thompson. 111 min.

Amidst sociopolitical unrest, financially struggling Cassius uses his “white voice” to climb the ranks of one of Oakland’s telemarketing companies, only to find himself sinking deeper into a surreal alternate world. The Coup’s Riley pushes the envelope of satire to make a radical statement that’s both wildly hilarious and unsettlingly familiar.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5

Film Series: Erin Brockovich

2000. USA. Dir: Steven Soderbergh. With Julia Roberts. 131 min.

A true story about the firebrand mom of three, who was desperate for a job when an unlikely chain of events landed in her lap a potentially history-making lawsuit that demanded her unique set of skills. Roberts won her Oscar portraying a trailblazing female activist with wit, passion, and determination like no other.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Become a volunteer docent!

Open Access Image from the Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University (photo: M. Johnston)

The Friends of the Davison Arts Center is looking for volunteer docents!

Every fall for over 40 years, the Friends of the Davison Arts Center brings more than 300 Middletown 4th graders to explore on-campus galleries as well as the Javanese Gamelan orchestra. Volunteer docents engage these students with the world of art, music, and architecture through hands-on activities, and become part of a great team alongside museum curators and educators.
No experience necessary! Docents should be enthusiastic, reliable, interested in the arts, comfortable working with kids and public speaking. Tours run October 18, 24, 25, 30 and November 1, 13, 14, 15 from 9:00 am – 12:30 pm.
All docents are required to commit to at least one shift and attend training on Monday, October 15 from 11:50 am -1:10 pm in the DAC. Lunch will be provided.
Interested?: Email Marisely Gonzalez, FDAC Docent Program Coordinator, marisely.wesleyan[at]gmail[dot]com
Date: Monday, October 15
Time: 11:50 AM-1:10 PM
Place: DAC

Emily Johnson/Catalyst: Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter

From the the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN):

Join us by the fire for a gathering hosted by Emily Johnson/Catalyst that centers around Indigenous protocols and knowledges, as we welcome the evening with our campus community and neighbors. Come sit and gaze at the stars, and share stories, conversation and food (bring food to share if you wish—hot apple cider will be provided). Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter is a community gathering. It is a way of being and a way of making. It is research and process as ceremony. It is dance. Come join us.

Rain Location: Beckham Hall (no fire)

Kinstillatory Mappings is co-hosted by the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN). It was created with funding from The MAP Fund, supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Emily Johnson is an artist who makes body-based work. A Bessie Award winning choreographer, Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Doris Duke Artist Award she is based in New York City. Originally from Alaska, she is of Yup’ik descent and since 1998 has created work that considers the experience of sensing and seeing performance. Her dances function as installations, engaging audiences within and through a space and environment—interacting with a place’s architecture, history, and role in community. Emily is trying to make a world where performance is part of life; where performance is an integral connection to each other, our environment, our stories, our past, present, and future. Emily’s written work has been published and commissioned by Dance Research Journal(University of Cambridge Press); SFMOMA; Transmotion Journal,University of Kent; Movement Research Journal; Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; and the recent compilation Imagine d Theaters (Routledge), edited by Daniel Sack.

Her choreography is presented across the United States and Australia and most recently at Santa Fe Opera with Doctor Atomic, directed by Peter Sellars. Emily is a lead collaborator in the Indigenous-artist led Healing Place Collaborative (Minneapolis, MN), focused on the vital role of the Mississippi River in the life of residents along its path; she was an inaugural participant in the Headlands Center for the Arts’ Climate Change Residency, a member of Creative Change at Sundance, and served as a water protector at Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. As a facilitator she has worked with artists and communities most notably during TIME PLACE SPACE, NOMAD in Wotjobaluk Country, Australia and during UMYUANGVIGKAQ with PS122 on Manhahtaan in Lenapehoking, a durational Long Table/Sewing Bee focused on indigenizing the performing arts and the world at large.

Her most recent work, Then a Cunning Voice and A Night We Spend Gazing at Stars—an all night outdoor performance gathering taking place on and near eighty-four community-hand-made quilts—premiered in Lenapehoking (NYC) with PS122 on Randall’s Island in summer 2017 and will tour to Chicago, San Francisco, and Narrm (Melbourne), Australia. Currently, she hosts monthly bonfires on the Lower East Side in Mannahatta in partnership with Abrons Art Center and is, with colleagues in Australia and Canada, developing a Global First Nations Performance Network.

Date: Tuesday, October 9
Time: 6:30-8:30 PM
Place: CFA Courtyard (Rain Location: Beckham Hall)
Facebook Event

Submit to Midriff Magazine!

From the editors of Midriff Magazine:

Submit to Wesleyan’s only womxn-centered publication! If you identify with womxnhood or femininity in any way, we want your writing (of all kinds), art, and anything else you can think of! Our meetings are Thursdays at 8 in PAC 104! Contact Steph (sades[at]wesleyan[dot]edu) or JR (jatkinson[at]wesleyan[dot]edu) with any questions, pitches, etc.! First draft deadline is 10/30, and final content deadline is 11/13!

Date: Thursdays
Time: 8:00 PM
Place: PAC 104
Submission Deadlines: Tuesday, October 30 (first draft) and Tuesday, November 13 (final content)

 

Film Series: The Palm Beach Story

1942. USA. Dir: Preston Sturges. With Claudette Colbert, Joel McCrea. 88 min.

This screwball comedy of love and mistaken identity follows a savvy housewife as she abandons her marriage in search of a wealthy man to wed, with her husband in hot pursuit. Sturges (The Lady Eve, Sullivan’s Travels) is at his best with this madcap mix of verbal sparring, physical humor, and outright zaniness.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family / Free

Film Series: Brokeback Mountain

2005. USA. Dir: Ang Lee. With Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal. 134 min.

Sheep herding in Wyoming may seem an unlikely place to find love, but Ennis and Jack share an attraction that won’t quit, enduring hardships, social burdens, and the passage of time. Groundbreaking performances anchor a canonical piece of American and Queer cinema that burns with a fierce and tender flame.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5