Category Archives: Art

Artful Lunch Series—Sharifa Lookman ’17

A message from Randi Plake in the Office of University Communications:

One artwork, one speaker, fifteen minutes. Join the Friends of the Davison Art Center for a presentation by Sharifa Lookman ’17 about her favorite work in the Davison Art Center collection. Bring your bag lunch and enjoy homemade cookies and conversation following the talk.

Date: Thursday, Feb. 23rd
Time: 12:10 p.m.
Place: Davison Art Center, Alsop House Dining Room, 301 High Street

VIDEO: Karmenife Paulino ’15 Delivers Powerful Comedy Set at Malcolm X House

cropped

Content warning: the following post and video discuss sexual violence and assault.

[Updated 2/16/17, 11:53AM] Check the bottom of the post for photos of the performance from Jejomar Erln Ysit ’19

If you were on campus at any point from Fall 2014 – Fall 2015, you might remember Karmenife Paulino ’15 as being something of a legend. Here are a few ways you may be familiar with her:

  • She became a very public activist against sexual violence, openly talking about her assault at Psi U her freshman year.
  • She also spoke out against members of Eclectic (which she was also a member of) for allowing her rapist into their home and perpetuating rape culture. Along with controversy surrounding a racial slur on a membership application, this contributed to Eclectic losing their house for the 2016-2017 school year.
  • She, along with Tess Altman ’17, created a photo project titled Reclamation during the Fall 2015 semester. We covered the project in a 12,000-word interview with Karmenife, and then the photos went viral. Even Margaret Cho took notice.

Since graduating, Karmenife has gotten involved with numerous projects and collaborations. She created a portrait series of black icons and turned OKCupid harassment (and her comebacks) into art. She’s written and spoken extensively on how white feminism perpetuates rape culture. She’s a very active presence on social media. And, to top it all off, Karmenife has started to perform as a comedian.

She returned to campus last Friday for a one-hour stand-up routine, “Make Your Own Reparations 101,” and delivered a rousing set to the packed basement of Malcolm X House. Her jokes covered everything from the Wes administration, to casual racism at her workplace, to scamming white men on Tinder. Watch the video of her performance after the jump:

Reading by Novelist Susan Choi

susan-choiFrom Quinn Frenzel ’16:

On Wednesday, February 15, 8:00 pm, at Russell House, the Wesleyan University English Department will host a reading by Millet writing fellow Susan Choi. Susan Choi studied literature at Yale and writing at Cornell, and worked for several years as a fact-checker for The New Yorker. Her first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. Her third novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. In 2010 she was named the inaugural recipient of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, she lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Date: Wednesday, February 15th
Time: 8-10pm
Place (UPDATED): Russell House Memorial Chapel

Date Change for Eli Clare, Annual Disability Studies Lecture!

Eli ClareFrom Professor Margot Weiss:

RESCHEDULED FROM STORM: Please join us Monday, February 13th at 4:30pm in Russell House to hear writer, activist, and poet Eli Clare read from his just-out-yesterday book Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure (Duke University Press 2017). Combining memoir, history, and cultural analysis, Brilliant Imperfection explores the deeply held belief that body-minds considered broken need to be fixed. Taking neither an anti- nor pro-cure position, Clare weaves together race, disability, sexuality, class, gender, and environmental politics to uncover the value of body-mind difference.

Date: Monday, February 13th
Time: 4:30-6PM
Place: Russell House

Guest Post: What’s Going On With Theater At Wesleyan?

theater

Some of you have probably seen on Facebook that there is something going wrong with the Theater Department, and might have further questions.  Maia Nelles-Sager ’17 wrote a piece explaining the state of the Wesleyan Theater Department and submitted it to Wesleying. We are deciding to post it because we think it represents an all-too-often occurrence where departments are neglected and visiting professors are overworked.

As with many things at Wesleyan, there are inner workings of the administration  to which students don’t have access. In the case of the post below, these things are having a direct impact on the formal education that we have come here to receive. As a prospective theater major, this post is something near and dear to me. I’ve seen a big cry for transparency in our community, and I hope you all will take time to see why many students are looking for it in the case of the Theater Department. Read past the jump for Maia’s post.

Submit to Reverberations

reverberations logoThere’s a new campus art/lit mag and they want you to submit your work:

Submit to our new publication: Reverberationsmag.com!

WHO WE ARE

Art isn’t just good or bad; it connects with us. We created Reverberations for young people to respond to art (in the most inclusive sense of the word). In this way, we begin to form our own identities and ideas. We hope to share work that engages with the big questions, that relates to the global and/or the individual, and, most of all, makes us feel deeply. There is nothing more exciting than the meaningful interaction between art and ourselves. –Linne and Sage

We’re looking for short (200-500 word) reviews that emotionally and intuitively engage with current art (movies, books, tv, dance, theater, etc, etc) as well as long-form or poetic/artistic responses to works from any cultural moment.

reverberationsmag.com/submit
and like us on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/reverberationsmag/

When to Submit: “Now and Forever”

“Hedwig & the Angry Inch” is Weird, Queer, and Very Wesleyan

Photo credit: Chloe Briskin

Last weekend, a production of the rock musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch performed three shows in Alpha Delta Phi’s Grotto. If you’ve never heard of Hedwig, let’s just say that it is a sight to behold, and this version was no exception.

I live in Alpha Delt, so skipping this show was out of the question for me; I do my laundry down the hall from the Grotto, and I kept walking in on Hedwig rehearsals during the first two weeks of school. I also knew several of the people who worked on it, including the director (Maia Nelles-Sager ’17), the stage manager (Chloe Briskin ’18), and the bassist (our managing editor Maya). But I really didn’t know what to expect. I knew a Wesleyan alum, Stephen Trask ’89, had written the music and lyrics. I knew that the main character was genderqueer – traditionally performed by a cis man in women’s clothing, although in this version the actor was also genderqueer – and that the only other character onstage was a gay man played by a woman. And I knew there was a rock band. But that’s about it.

Exhibition: Clarissa Tossin, “Stereoscopic Vision”

Clarissa Tossin, When two places look alike, 2012–2013, photograph series, 40 x 27 inches

Clarissa Tossin, When two places look alike, 2012–2013, photograph series, 40 x 27 inches

From the CFA:

We see in stereo: each eye registers something different, and the information contained in each is then stitched together in our brains, resulting in a three-dimensional visualization—something more complex, and greater in meaning, than when read as two separate images.

“Stereoscopic Vision,” the Brazilian-born, Los Angeles-based artist Clarissa Tossin‘s first solo exhibition in the Northeast, features key objects in photography, sculpture, and video from several bodies of work to highlight the dualities between natural and manufactured; two and three-dimensions; co-dependent economies; intention and actuality; and the United States and Brazil.

Support for this exhibition provided by Wesleyan University’s College of the Environment and the Department of Art and Art History.

The opening reception for this exhibition is on Tuesday, January 31 at 4:30 PM in the Zilkha Gallery.

Exhibition Dates: Tuesday, January 31 through Sunday, March 5
Times Open: Tuesday-Sunday, 12-5 PM
Place: Zilkha Gallery
cfa link

Audition for Aporia!

The Gospel Truth

Miranda Hoyt-Disick ’19 writes in:

We’re back!
If you liked the staged-reading, you’ll love our fully-fledged production of this original student-written musical advised by none other than Lin Manuel Miranda 02’s writing partner, Professor Quiara Hudes.

Synopsis: In ancient Greece, The wise-talking Protaginus travels to Athens to trick wealthy patrons out of their money, only to fall for the wrong girl and become embroiled in an epic (rap) battle of rhetoric in the process. This wry, musical throwback explores competing theories of philosophy that we still debate in 2016, indulging in a kickline or two along the way.

What you should bring: 16 bars of your favorite song and a monologue (or joke, or just really funny story) to help us get to know you.

Callbacks will be Sunday, January 28th, same time, same place.

Written by: Zach Ezer ’17 and Eli Maskin ’17
Directed by: Miranda Hoyt-Disick
contact Miranda Hoyt-Disick at mhoytdisick[at]wesleyan[dot]edu with any questions.

Date: Friday and Saturday, January 27-28
Time: 4:30-6:30pm
Place: Alpha Delt (we’ll let you in–picking locks is not part of your audition. But if you can do that let us know cause that’s cool and useful)

Mel Hsu ’13 releases new album, “i was a phoenix”

This past December, Wesleyan’s very own Mel Hsu ’13 released her third album, i was a phoenixIt features original jazz compositions and performances by Hsu, who studied music composition at Wes. Her previous record, 2014’s Call Home the Crow, is comprised of her senior music thesis and was recorded in Memorial Chapel.

Hsu dedicated i was a phoenix to Claire Randall ’12, who passed away just before its release. She describes Randall as “the fierce and transcendent force that taught us how to be our most courageous and vulnerable selves– an anchor and a rock of this ensemble who breathed magic into every nook and cranny of this album.”

i was a phoenix is available for CD, MP3, and streaming on Bandcamp.