Category Archives: Campus Life

Welcome Class of 2023: ED2 Edition!

This past Wednesday, Wesleyan University welcomed a new batch of students via Early Decision 2! Firstly, I’d like to speak directly to our freshly hatched 2023’ers and welcome you to our community. You have just committed to ~4 years of magical experiences that will leave you both intellectually enlightened and slightly bloated.

As someone who was accepted in ED2, I understand the excitement of receiving this acceptance at the peak of your senioritis. I wish you the best of luck now that you are legally bound to this institution and its host town, the booming metropolis of Middletown, Connecticut.

Another perk of your acceptance is that you are free to explore the most creative and news-worthy student blog, Wesleying. Here you can learn about all the hot topics of discussion that provide the only entertainment in our mundane undergraduate lives. From campus events to random memes to social commentary on campus life, Wesleying has it all. *wink*

We feel very lucky that your first-choice school rejected you.

 

Hot for Teacher: The Best On-Campus Date Spots for You and Your Secret Professor Lover

Editor’s Note: While it can be fun to joke about professor crushes, we want to emphasize that this post represents fictional situations, and that we do not promote such relationships in real life. We don’t want to make light of the actual harmful power dynamics that can arise from these prohibited relationships. Furthermore, research and experiences of Wesleyan professors have shown that the objectification of female and non-white professors is a barrier to them advancing in their fields, particularly when it comes to course evaluations.

Wesleying extends our support and our platform to any survivor of sexual misconduct who wishes to share their story. We condemn all forms of sexual misconduct including professor-student relationships and discriminatory employment practices based on gender. If you believe that you or someone else has been the recipient of such advances, you can always reach out to SACE Director Johanna DeBari or SACE Intern Rachele Merliss ‘19 to talk, and you can find a complete list of on- and off-campus resources here.

this is just some german mathematician we found on the internet

We all know how it starts: First they asked the class to call them by their first name, but soon enough you’re giving each other the eyes in Tishler and making out in Music Studios practice rooms. What started out as a spark has turned into an illicit romance between you and a man or woman a decade or four older than you. What now?

Fear not! If you’re an aspiring Emmanuel Macron struggling on how and where to spend extra-curricular time with your Brigette, we’ve got you covered. The criteria:

Intimacy: How romantic is it?
Privacy: How secluded is it?
Convenience: How accessible is it?
Covertness: How easy would it be to explain to a nosy Michael Roth?

Let’s get that extra credit!

2019 Honorary Degree Recipients Announced: Hartman ’84, Carby, & Sanders ’69

In an email this morning, President Roth ’76 announced this year’s Commencement Speaker will be Saidiya Hartman ’84 (above). Reverend Edwin C. Sanders II ’69 (left) and Former Wesleyan Professor Hazel V. Carby (right) will also receive honorary degrees at the University’s 187th Commencement.

This seems to be the first time in a while that Roth has actually read the room when selecting honorees for Commencement. It’s certainly gratifying to see a Black woman being honored for her achievements on the 50th anniversary of the Vanguard Class of ’96 and the founding of the African American studies program (which has finally been received department status this year).

Certainly, this year’s honorees are a welcome variation from last year’s Commencement Speaker controversy. As many of you recall, Daniel Handler ’92, who has a history of racist and sexist harassment, was chosen as the 2018 Commencement Speaker, while Dr. Anita Hillknown for advocating against those very abuses, was relegated to a lesser position of honorary degree recipient. Handler later withdrew as Commencement Speaker following a flurry of student and alumni demands to #CancelHandler18. Notably, President Roth and the administration did nothing in response to concerns and complaints from survivors, students and alumni of color, and other members of the Wesleyan community. Dr. Hill graciously agreed to give the Commencement address in Handler’s stead.

Hopefully this year’s Honorary Degree recipients can become emblematic of the excellence that Wesleyan chooses to honor at future Commencement Ceremonies, rather than continuing a pattern of choosing powerful (and often problematic) white men who don’t represent the community or values that Wesleyan claims to strive toward.

If you have thoughts or feelings about this year’s selection of honorees, we welcome write-ins and guest posts! Just shoot us an email at staff[at]wesleying[dot]edu.

The full text of Roth’s email can be read below:

why is this school literally macklemore

I remember the first full-price clothing item I ever bought. No discounts. No coupon. It was my first semester at Wesleyan, and I had to get a black dress for my WesWinds concert. My mom and I had gone to Zara to check their overwhelmingly black aesthetic, and I found a black dress with a lace top. I thought it was the perfect dress until I checked the price tag. $50. We both knew that we would have to wait forever for that dress to go on sale, and I didn’t own an appropriate dress for my concert, which was quickly approaching.

My mom gave me a look and said hadi, which translates into a bunch of things in English. It can mean come on, let’s, but in this situation, it meant, we’re going to ignore the price because this is a pretty dress. Screw it, let’s buy it. It also meant, let’s do this quickly before my wallet changes its mind.

For most of my life, I’ve been much more accustomed to hand-me-downs and clearance rack finds than full-price fashions and expensive trends. Growing up, my favorite outfit was a sequined denim jumpsuit that had been passed down to me. This was, in retrospect, absolutely ridiculous and marginally over-the-top for a pre-teen to wear, but it was special to me. Our hand-me-down system was cross-continental: my friend’s mom would pass down her daughter’s clothes to me, where I would get some use out of it, and then those clothes were packed away to be brought to my cousins in Turkey, where the cascade of hand-me-downs began again: starting with one of the middle cousins, to the one slightly younger, to the second-cousin-twice-removed-or-what-we-just-call-cousin down the line. As long as it was in wearable condition, it was passed down.

Upon one of my visits back home, I saw one of my cousins wearing a dress that I remember wearing in elementary school: white, with some red, orange, and yellow flowers scattered along the hem and waistline. It was one of my favorite dresses; now, it had been passed down two bodies before reaching my cousin’s closet.

The topic of clothing within a low-income family is complex: a web of societal standards of dress combined with financial barriers. I had learned quickly that my mom and I could not afford regular-priced clothing, so our trips to the Gap consisted of darting toward the sale section, calculating sales tax on each item, never crossing the line between clearance and regular-priced, avoiding lusting over a dress that we couldn’t afford. My wardrobe’s guiding logic was out of season: we bought summer clothes in the winter when it went on sale and winter clothes at the beginning of summer, estimating how much I would grow in the meantime. On the few occasions my mom and I went through the in-season section, we would take a mental note on the clothes we would wait to go on clearance, eventually buying them a few months later. This was our process; we waited for coupons, for credit card rewards, for the hand-me-downs supplementing my needs in the meantime.

If You Want Your Event Posted to Wesleying, Read This!

A lot of this is recycled text (thx wilk) from recycled text from two years ago (thx Maya) from recycled text from three years ago (thx Samira), but here are some tips and guidelines for submitting your events!

HEY WESLEYAN COMMUNITY!

Did you know that we post events? Wondering if you should submit your event? Well, you should! Wesleying gets anywhere from 500 to 1,200 views per day as of late. Submitting your event to be posted here is good for ~exposure~ and also a way to reach different audiences than those reached by Facebook’s weird algorithm.

We love posting your events, but we get a lot of them. If you want your meeting/audition/application deadline/concert/thing posted to Wesleying on time, please use this form here. This time of the year is especially busy which makes our inbox quickly burst at the seams, so it helps if you submit your event at least 4 or 5 days in advance.

Much of this is elaborated from our event submissions policy, but here are some things you can do to make life easier:

Program Housing Fair & House Hopping Day

Stephanie Burke Lewis from ResLife writes in:

Fanatical for Farming? Smitten with Science? Longing for La Casa? Learn about Program Housing for Fall 2019! Come to the Program Housing Fair on Friday, February 15th from 10:00 am-12:00 pm in Beckham Hall. Tour the houses and meet current house members on Sunday, February 17th from 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm during House Hopping Day! Check out the current Program Houses at https://www.wesleyan.edu/reslife/ugrad_housing/program-housing.html

Date: Friday, February 15 (Fair) & Sunday, February 17 (House Hopping)
Time: 10:00 AM-12:00 PM (Fair) & 12:00-5:00 PM (House Hopping)
Place: Beckham Hall (Fair) & Program Houses (House Hopping)

2018: A Very Wesleying Year in Review

To say it’s been a wild year would be an insult to things that deserve the title “wild.” But, here we are, a month into reflecting and trying to understand what even happened in 2018, publishing this article to try to find some sense. And what other than to write about a year at an institution that makes no sense during any given year?!

Yes, friends, I am going to try to review this very confusing year––and bonus: I wasn’t even on campus for half of it! Because I am perpetually on the Internet, I have been filled in on the ~happenings~ last semester and will try my best to give 2018 the little justice it deserves.

Disclaimer: this is a subjective process, and things change at Wesleyan sometimes very quickly, but also sometimes veeeeery slowly. If I’ve missed something, let us know at staff[at]wesleying[dot]org. Send us your funny moments, your important moments…just all the moments.

Because this year was just…a lot…I’m going to do my best to organize this information as effectively as possible.

If you want to procrastinate because it’s been a week of classes, here’s some old content: 20122013201420152016, 2017.

Everyone Can Calm Down, the Points Calculator is Updated!

While I’d like to assume that most of our readers visit this wonderful blog to read our #hip #content, it appears as if a lot of our web traffic is actually from people attempting to use the points calculator.

Maybe in my old age (and my all-points meal plan), I don’t have as much points-related anxiety as y’all, but I’ve never actually used the calculator. However, I acknowledge its utility, and some of you are extremely vigilant at reminding us when it’s not updated for the new semester.


Anyways, all of this to say:


Happy spring semester, and remember, there’s almost always a junior or senior who can spare some points to an underclassman in need, and the youngins who still get meal swipes can generally swipe you in with a guest swipe if you’re on all points!

Edgar Beckham Awards Committee

The Edgar Beckham Social Justice Awards Ceremony seeks to honor the late Dean Edgar Beckham, whose dedication to social justice continues to positively impact the Wesleyan community. Dean Edgar Beckham was a national leader for efforts to increase racial and cultural diversity on college campuses. He was the first African-American Dean of the College at Wesleyan University.

He led the Ford Foundation’s Campus Diversity Initiative in the 1990’s and in 1998, he joined the Association of American Colleges and Universities as a senior fellow, consulting universities on matters of educational quality.

We aim to celebrate the students, faculty, staff, and members of the Middletown community whose efforts align with the ideals that guided his work. Our hope is that the recognition of these individuals will inspire other members of the community to commit to social justice work of their own.

We are looking for innovative individuals who have a passion for social justice and will have the time to commit to planning this event, which is held annually on the last Sunday of April.

Date: Saturday, February 16
Time: 5 PM
Nomination Form