Category Archives: Campus Life

Laundry: A Sock Story

My story begins on a regular September afternoon. My laundry basket, bursting at the seams with an array of weather-inappropriate clothing, had toppled over entirely. I decided after some quick calculations that I would be able to complete the full laundry cycle in the amount of time I had before dinner. I could not have been more wrong.

Ask Wesleying: Local Co-Op, Local-er Hookups

Welcome to the first installment of Ask Wesleying, an advice column about any and all things Wes! Have a question about life at Wes? Submit it to get it answered in Ask Wesleying! You can find all of the Ask Wesleying columns here.

This week’s question is about something that’s on many people’s minds with the start of Local Co-op:

Dear Wesleying,

Why are all of my hookups always in line for co-op RIGHT when I get there? Why are they all friends? Why is co-op pickup scheduled such that I can’t go home and change into a cute outfit beforehand so that all of my hookups see how hot I am in co-op line? UGH!

Sincerely,
Local Co-Op, Local-er Hookups

You can read the answer to this week’s question below the jump!

Film Series: Sorry to Bother You

2018. USA. Dir: Boots Riley. With Lakeith Stanfield, Tessa Thompson. 111 min.

Amidst sociopolitical unrest, financially struggling Cassius uses his “white voice” to climb the ranks of one of Oakland’s telemarketing companies, only to find himself sinking deeper into a surreal alternate world. The Coup’s Riley pushes the envelope of satire to make a radical statement that’s both wildly hilarious and unsettlingly familiar.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5

Film Series: Erin Brockovich

2000. USA. Dir: Steven Soderbergh. With Julia Roberts. 131 min.

A true story about the firebrand mom of three, who was desperate for a job when an unlikely chain of events landed in her lap a potentially history-making lawsuit that demanded her unique set of skills. Roberts won her Oscar portraying a trailblazing female activist with wit, passion, and determination like no other.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Pumpkin Fest!

It’s fall and you know what that means: Pumpkin Fest!

FREE and open to the public!

Grab your friends and family and join us at Long Lane Farm’s annual Pumpkin Fest, Saturday, October 13, 2018, from noon to 4 pm! Featuring live student bands, farm tours, crafts, baked goods for sale, a pie-eating contest, vendors & student groups, FREE veggie burgers and cider, and much more!

Visit wesleyan.edu/coe for more info. Sponsored by Long Lane Farm, the College of the Environment and Bon Appetit.

Rain date: Sunday, October 14, noon to 4 p.m.

Date: Saturday, October 13
Time: 12:00 PM-4:00 PM
Place: Long Lane Farm
Facebook Event

Emily Johnson/Catalyst: Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter

From the the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN):

Join us by the fire for a gathering hosted by Emily Johnson/Catalyst that centers around Indigenous protocols and knowledges, as we welcome the evening with our campus community and neighbors. Come sit and gaze at the stars, and share stories, conversation and food (bring food to share if you wish—hot apple cider will be provided). Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter is a community gathering. It is a way of being and a way of making. It is research and process as ceremony. It is dance. Come join us.

Rain Location: Beckham Hall (no fire)

Kinstillatory Mappings is co-hosted by the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN). It was created with funding from The MAP Fund, supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Emily Johnson is an artist who makes body-based work. A Bessie Award winning choreographer, Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Doris Duke Artist Award she is based in New York City. Originally from Alaska, she is of Yup’ik descent and since 1998 has created work that considers the experience of sensing and seeing performance. Her dances function as installations, engaging audiences within and through a space and environment—interacting with a place’s architecture, history, and role in community. Emily is trying to make a world where performance is part of life; where performance is an integral connection to each other, our environment, our stories, our past, present, and future. Emily’s written work has been published and commissioned by Dance Research Journal(University of Cambridge Press); SFMOMA; Transmotion Journal,University of Kent; Movement Research Journal; Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; and the recent compilation Imagine d Theaters (Routledge), edited by Daniel Sack.

Her choreography is presented across the United States and Australia and most recently at Santa Fe Opera with Doctor Atomic, directed by Peter Sellars. Emily is a lead collaborator in the Indigenous-artist led Healing Place Collaborative (Minneapolis, MN), focused on the vital role of the Mississippi River in the life of residents along its path; she was an inaugural participant in the Headlands Center for the Arts’ Climate Change Residency, a member of Creative Change at Sundance, and served as a water protector at Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. As a facilitator she has worked with artists and communities most notably during TIME PLACE SPACE, NOMAD in Wotjobaluk Country, Australia and during UMYUANGVIGKAQ with PS122 on Manhahtaan in Lenapehoking, a durational Long Table/Sewing Bee focused on indigenizing the performing arts and the world at large.

Her most recent work, Then a Cunning Voice and A Night We Spend Gazing at Stars—an all night outdoor performance gathering taking place on and near eighty-four community-hand-made quilts—premiered in Lenapehoking (NYC) with PS122 on Randall’s Island in summer 2017 and will tour to Chicago, San Francisco, and Narrm (Melbourne), Australia. Currently, she hosts monthly bonfires on the Lower East Side in Mannahatta in partnership with Abrons Art Center and is, with colleagues in Australia and Canada, developing a Global First Nations Performance Network.

Date: Tuesday, October 9
Time: 6:30-8:30 PM
Place: CFA Courtyard (Rain Location: Beckham Hall)
Facebook Event

Encounters with Wild Animals: The Initiation

Over my first few weeks at Wes I’ve had some pretty wild encounters with some captivating, deceiving creatures. How did I get myself into this? Well, it all started with a small, innocent baby rabbit staring at me with the most innocent gaze — “wow,” I said out loud, “Wes is wild” (*scares rabbit away*). Little did I know that the whole force of nature would prove to me that we are, in fact, not alone in this campus.

Over the next few days, I had encounters with tarantula-size spiders in my bed, a group of around 15 bees (not very happy with my presence), a very sketchy rat and a partially bald black squirrel. Oh, and, by the way, I was also chased by a skunk up to Olin.

I found some comfort, however, in knowing that I am not alone in this situation. For instance, out of nowhere, I heard somebody screaming down my hall, and when I arrived, the girl, whose name is to remain undisclosed, said: “You don’t understand! The moth came AT ME!” She then continued by describing the moth’s intentionality in “attacking” her.

Later that week I started to hear more stories from several people who had similar or worse experiences of this nature, like ending up in the hospital after a baby squirrel imprinted on them (don’t ask how). After hearing all those stories, I just feel better. I have no idea of what my next encounters with the wild are going to be like, but at least I know that animals are not conspiring against me, or, at least, not exclusively.

If you have any stories of encounters with wild animals at Wes, tell us at staff[at]wesleying[dot]org or our tipbox!

Introducing: Ask Wesleying!

College is hard. From adjusting to living away from your family for the first time to figuring out how to navigate academics to making friends, these 4-ish years of your life are full of new challenges.

I’ve always wanted to start an advice column. Now that I’m in my senior year, I’m taking advantage of my Wesleyan/life wisdom (also being managing editor of Wesleying and therefore being able to kinda do whatever I want) by starting a weekly advice column! Read on to learn more:

Welcome to Ask Wesleying! Each week I will answer questions from students just like you about anything having to do with anything and everything Wesleyan University: social life, academics, living on your own, roommates, hookup culture, extracurriculars, meal plans, and more!

In order for this to work, y’all have to send in some questions! Questions can be submitted anonymously via this form, or less-anonymously by emailing us at staff[at]wesleying[dot]org (put “Ask Wesleying” in the subject line)! All questions will be answered and posted anonymously, even if you email us including your name. Some weeks, I might reach out to other writers or my friends to guest-answer your questions!

 

Film Series: The Palm Beach Story

1942. USA. Dir: Preston Sturges. With Claudette Colbert, Joel McCrea. 88 min.

This screwball comedy of love and mistaken identity follows a savvy housewife as she abandons her marriage in search of a wealthy man to wed, with her husband in hot pursuit. Sturges (The Lady Eve, Sullivan’s Travels) is at his best with this madcap mix of verbal sparring, physical humor, and outright zaniness.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family / Free

Film Series: Brokeback Mountain

2005. USA. Dir: Ang Lee. With Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal. 134 min.

Sheep herding in Wyoming may seem an unlikely place to find love, but Ennis and Jack share an attraction that won’t quit, enduring hardships, social burdens, and the passage of time. Groundbreaking performances anchor a canonical piece of American and Queer cinema that burns with a fierce and tender flame.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5