Category Archives: Classes

Unofficial Orientation 2021: Drop/Add Tips and Tricks

This is part of our 2021 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

Disclaimer: While the tips introduced in this post can be applied universally, you should remember that your odds of getting into a class depend primarily not on your effort, but on the professor’s policies and how popular the class is (and, also, maybe how lucky you are). It’s pretty much impossible to convince a professor of an extremely popular class who simply won’t go over the limit to accept you into their class, even if you do absolutely everything right. But, trying can’t hurt, right?

Hello, and welcome to today’s episode of Unofficial Orientation. The focus of today’s episode will be mainly on the devil known as drop/add. If you don’t know what that is (seriously, how do you not know what that is yet?), the folks at the registrar’s office have provided this overview. During this period, students are able to add or drop pretty much any class to their schedule, regardless of the limits posed by pre-reg (however, your faculty advisor will have to approve an extension in your credit limit if you go above 4 credits). I also highly recommend you check out this FAQ, also kindly prepared by the registrar’s office, as a way to get the basics down before proceeding. This post will not be doing much explaining of Drop/Add itself. It will, however, try to warn you, innocent, unassuming frosh, about the reality of this brutal race and offer some insights (read: randomly gathered knowledge that may have been the results of embarrassing behaviors of the author (and past authors)).

If reading long articles is not your thing, scroll down to the bottom for a TL;DR.

Unofficial Orientation 2021: First Year Classes

This is an update of un meli-melo’s post which was an update of Jackson‘s post from 2015, which was an update of skorn‘s post from 2014. Which was an update of DaPope‘s post from 2013. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, or some shit like that, right?

 

This is part of our 2021 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

Take a nice deep breath in, at this point you’re either on-campus or just days away.  The excitement is tangible, new campus, new room, new people.  Before you get too wrapped up in your new freedom let’s talk about the real excitement: Your courses, the splendid garden that is Wesmaps, and what this year might be like academically.

I myself remember being confused by the process of choosing and then actually signing up for that class during my first semester so hopefully, this post provides a little clarity in the whole subject (and not the opposite).  Worst comes to worst just remember that most first-year classes are fairly big and your chances of getting into them are pretty high.

On that happy note, let’s dive right into this abyss!

Celebration of Science Theses

Professor Singer from the Biology Department writes in:

Natural Sciences and Mathematics BA and MA students present their thesis work in poster format. Refreshments provided!

Date: Friday, April 26
Time: 12:30-2:00 PM
Place: 
Exley Lobby

THESISCRAZY 2019 (Part 7): IT’S THE DAY DO YOU HAVE YOUR CHAMPAGNE

caroline working on her thesis in one of her many carrels

Welcome to the 7th installment of thesiscrazy!!!! This post includes interviews with Will Barr ’18, MA ’19, who is doing an MB&B masters thesis, we have Caroline Kravitz ’19, doing a local history thesis, Tomás Rogel ’19, doing a sociology thesis, and Lindsay Zelson ’19, doing a history thesis! Read past the jump to learn more about these wonderful, amazing, accomplished human beings :)

For past installments of thesiscrazy, click here.

MARTIN F. MANALANSAN IV, “Enmeshment: Queer Togetherness and Caring”

The Global Queer Studies Lecture Series presents:

Join us for a lecture on Martin Manalansan‘s book in progress, “Queer Dwellings.” Deploying his framing of “queer as mess,” Manalansan argues for a capacious yet recalcitrant notion of queer caring and togetherness that goes beyond scripted ideals of solidarity, empathy and concern. Manalansan is associate professor of American Studies at University of Minnesota. His books include Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora; Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader; and Queer Globalizations: Citizenship and the Afterlife of Colonialism.

Date: Thursday, April 4
Time: 4:30-6 PM
Place: Russell House

CAAS Distinguished Lecture: Saidiya Hartman

An exciting event happening this week!

CAAS Distinguished Lecture
Saidiya Hartman ’84
Commencement Speaker for the class of 2019

Saidiya Hartman ‘84, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, is a scholar with interests in African American and American literature, cultural history, slavery, law and literature, and performance studies. She is the author of Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments (2019), Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route (2007), and Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery and Self-Making in Nineteenth Century America (1997).

Date: Thursday, March 28
Time: 4:30-6:00 PM
Place: Beckham Hall

Theory Certificate Presents: Anti-Fascist Philosophy

The Theory Certificate writes in:

Robert Stolz (NYU) will speak on the Japanese Marxist philosopher Tosaka Jun. Tosaka was a major yet underappreciated figure in twentieth-century theory whose work encompassed philosophy of science, philosophy of history, and cultural critique. His writings are comparable to, and resonate powerfully with, those of Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch, Herbert Marcuse, and other luminaries in the historical-materialist tradition. Professor Stolz will discuss his translation of Tosaka’s major text, The Japanese Ideology (1935), an original philosophical critique of fascism that, as Stolz puts it, “continues to shed light on the most urgent and persistent problems in philosophy and politics, especially the deep relationships between capitalism, nationalism, liberalism, fascism, and everyday life.”

Date: Tuesday, February 6
Time: 4:30-6:00 PM
Place: Downey 113

Cracking Open a Pecan

This fall, I taught a student forum through the American Studies department called “Critical Perspectives on Texas.” Historically Texas has served as a site of settler colonialism, racial domination, strict reification of gender roles and repressive sexuality, and economic importance with its oil and agricultural industries.

To name a few topics, the class examined: Texas’s modern-day electoral politics in sociohistorical context; intersectional feminist border studies and the Drug War; health care disparities, race, and climate change in Houston; gentrification and segregation in Austin; the legacy of plantation slavery in the influential Texas prison system; cowboy culture and the myth of the frontier; and indigenous resistance to the U.S.-Mexico border wall.

I grew up in Austin, Texas, and as an American Studies major, a growing activist, and someone who has become obsessed with regionalism since coming to Wesleyan, teaching this forum was a way for me to better understand my home and to help other students learn about the state through a critical lens. I wrote this piece, “Cracking Open a Pecan,” as a final project for our last day of class:

All Campus Email: Changes in Course Re-Take and Incomplete Policies

As #FinalsSzn rapidly approaches/has already begun for many of us, Wesleyan has implemented some new policies which may impact how you address academic challenges this semester and in the future.

This afternoon, Dean for Academic Advancement Louise Brown in Student Affairs sent out an email detailing some changes to academic policies. If you haven’t been keeping a close eye on WSA agendas and committee reports (which are emailed out to the student body prior to weekly Sunday night meetings), you may have been caught off-guard by these seemingly sudden changes to policies that many students don’t even know exist. I do read all the WSA emails (bc I’m a big dork and like to look for fun things to report about), so I was vaguely aware of the new re-take policy, but I had no idea that the incomplete policy was changing.

Here’s a breakdown of what changed, what didn’t, and what it means for students and professors:

WarGames (1983)

Check out this event tomorrow:

A screening of the Cold War sci fi WarGames (1983), featuring a very young Matthew Broderick as a computer nerd who nearly triggers World War III when he mistakenly hacks into a NORAD supercomputer simulation. Associated with HIST/SISP/ENVS 387: The History of the End.

Date: Tuesday, November 13
Time: 7:10 PM
Place: Powell Cinema