Category Archives: Classes

Ask Wesleying: Withdrawing and Worried

Welcome to the second installment of Ask Wesleying, an advice column about any and all things Wes! Have a question about life at Wes? Submit it to get it answered in Ask Wesleying! You can find all of the Ask Wesleying columns here.

This week’s question is about withdrawing from a class after drop-add ends:

Dear Wesleying,

Is it a bad idea to drop a course in my first semester? Will it be hard to catch up on credits? Will it look bad?

Sincerely,
Withdrawing and Worried

You can read the answer to this week’s question below the jump!

LIVEBLOG: Zach is Back! (And Hermes is Teaching!)

Ever since Lily Herman ’16 (aka hermes) announced that she would be teaching a course called “It’s a Mess”: An Academic and Practical Look at Digital Media in the Late 2010s this fall, we’ve been eagerly awaiting the course’s treatment of our very own digital media of the late 2010s (and earlier): Wesleying.org!

Tonight, Zach Schonfeld ’13 (aka Zach) is guest-lecturing for Lily’s class on the topic “The Role of Campus Media,” and in typical Wesleying fashion, we’ll be liveblogging it! Read below the jump for a window into the fun!

Emily Johnson/Catalyst: Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter

From the the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN):

Join us by the fire for a gathering hosted by Emily Johnson/Catalyst that centers around Indigenous protocols and knowledges, as we welcome the evening with our campus community and neighbors. Come sit and gaze at the stars, and share stories, conversation and food (bring food to share if you wish—hot apple cider will be provided). Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter is a community gathering. It is a way of being and a way of making. It is research and process as ceremony. It is dance. Come join us.

Rain Location: Beckham Hall (no fire)

Kinstillatory Mappings is co-hosted by the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN). It was created with funding from The MAP Fund, supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Emily Johnson is an artist who makes body-based work. A Bessie Award winning choreographer, Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Doris Duke Artist Award she is based in New York City. Originally from Alaska, she is of Yup’ik descent and since 1998 has created work that considers the experience of sensing and seeing performance. Her dances function as installations, engaging audiences within and through a space and environment—interacting with a place’s architecture, history, and role in community. Emily is trying to make a world where performance is part of life; where performance is an integral connection to each other, our environment, our stories, our past, present, and future. Emily’s written work has been published and commissioned by Dance Research Journal(University of Cambridge Press); SFMOMA; Transmotion Journal,University of Kent; Movement Research Journal; Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; and the recent compilation Imagine d Theaters (Routledge), edited by Daniel Sack.

Her choreography is presented across the United States and Australia and most recently at Santa Fe Opera with Doctor Atomic, directed by Peter Sellars. Emily is a lead collaborator in the Indigenous-artist led Healing Place Collaborative (Minneapolis, MN), focused on the vital role of the Mississippi River in the life of residents along its path; she was an inaugural participant in the Headlands Center for the Arts’ Climate Change Residency, a member of Creative Change at Sundance, and served as a water protector at Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. As a facilitator she has worked with artists and communities most notably during TIME PLACE SPACE, NOMAD in Wotjobaluk Country, Australia and during UMYUANGVIGKAQ with PS122 on Manhahtaan in Lenapehoking, a durational Long Table/Sewing Bee focused on indigenizing the performing arts and the world at large.

Her most recent work, Then a Cunning Voice and A Night We Spend Gazing at Stars—an all night outdoor performance gathering taking place on and near eighty-four community-hand-made quilts—premiered in Lenapehoking (NYC) with PS122 on Randall’s Island in summer 2017 and will tour to Chicago, San Francisco, and Narrm (Melbourne), Australia. Currently, she hosts monthly bonfires on the Lower East Side in Mannahatta in partnership with Abrons Art Center and is, with colleagues in Australia and Canada, developing a Global First Nations Performance Network.

Date: Tuesday, October 9
Time: 6:30-8:30 PM
Place: CFA Courtyard (Rain Location: Beckham Hall)
Facebook Event

Lila Abu-Lughod, “Framing Islam: ‘Violent Extremism’ and the Rise of Securofeminism”

Professor Margot Weiss, Chair of the Anthropology Department writes in:

Please join us on Thursday for the Anthropology Annual Lecture with Lila Abu-Lughod, feminist anthropologist and premiere scholar of gender, Islam, global feminism, and Middle East politics.

In this talk, she will be sharing new work on the dangerous collusion between international women’s rights advocates and the global security enterprise called Countering Violent Extremism (CVE).

Check out Lila Abu-Lughod speaking with the New York Times about the gap between popular Western beliefs about “Muslim women” and the reality: https://www.nytimes.com/video/books/review/100000002617743/the-read-around-lila-abu-lughod.html

Lila Abu-Lughod is the Joseph L. Buttenweiser Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University and the author of seven books including Do Muslim Women Need Saving?, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society, Dramas of Nationhood: The Politics of Television in Egypt, and Nakba: Palestine, 1948, and the Claims of Memory.

Date: Thursday, October 11
Time: 4:30 PM
Place: Shanklin 107
Facebook Event

Theory Certificate presents “The Illusion of Equality”

From Professor Matthew Garrett:

The Certificate in Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory presents:
“The Illusion of Equality in Kantian Cosmopolitanism”

Jameliah Bournahou (Georgia College and College of the Holy Cross)

This talk is co-sponsored by the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program.

Some scholars argue that Kant is universally egalitarian because in the essay “Toward Perpetual Peace” (1795), Kant offers new provisions that displace the racist views that he previously held in the essays on race of the 1780s. This argument presumes that Kant’s cosmopolitan philosophy is synonymous with universal egalitarianism because it is understood to be opposed to inequality. Professor Bournahou argues that Kant’s cosmopolitan philosophy is not universally egalitarian and in fact allows for inequality. Bournahou refers to a lesser recognized discussion Kant has in “Toward Perpetual Peace” where he argues that the cosmopolitan goal is to unify the nations and not the moral improvement of the species which would presumably establish universal egalitarianism.

Date: Tuesday, October 2
Time: 4:30-6:00 PM
PlaceDowney 113

Olin Thesis Carrel Assignments Emailed Out

This post mostly concerns the senior thesis writers among us (and their current or future paramours who may be interested in hooking up in a thesis carrel this year).

Thanks to an anonymous tipbox contribution (and many of my classmates who gleefully announced they got a carrel) we now know that Olin thesis carrel assignments were emailed out this afternoon.

Unlike in previous years when a list of carrel assignments and the waiting list were posted only as a sheet of paper in Olin, this year’s lucky carrel recipients received individual emails alerting them of carrel assignments, while those who didn’t get a carrel (aka me) have yet to hear anything official (email after the jump).

Master’s Class Fall 2018–Novelist-Playwright James Magruder

From the Shapiro Center for Writing:

Shapiro Center for Writing, Master Class Fall 2018

Workshop for Stage and Page!!!

James Magruder is a fiction writer, playwright, and translator. His Three French Comedies (Yale University Press), was named an “Outstanding Literary Translation of the Year” by the American Literary Translators Association. Today, his versions of Molière, Marivaux, Lesage, Labiche, Gozzi, Dickens, Hofmannsthal, and Giraudoux have been produced across the country. He also wrote the book for the much-loved Broadway musical Triumph of Love.

His stories have appeared in New England Review, The Normal School, The Gettysburg Review, Bloom, Subtropics, and the anthologies Boy Crazy and New Stories from the Midwest, among others. His debut novel, Sugarless (University of Wisconsin Press), was a Lambda Literary Award finalist and was shortlisted for the VCU Cabell First Novelists Award and the 2010 William Saroyan International Writing Prize. His first story collection, Let Me See It, appeared in June 2014 from TriQuarterly Books/Northwestern University Press. (“There are few authors who write with as much sensitivity and tenderness as James Magruder; he has a way of finding something beautiful in the most heartbreaking moments . . . With sharp touches of humor, this is a marvel of a story.” —Kevin Wilson, author of The Family Fang)

James is a four-time fellow of the MacDowell Colony. His writing has also been supported by the New Harmony Project, the Ucross Foundation, the Blue Mountain Center, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Sewanee Writers Conference, and the Jerome Foundation. In addition to his plays and fiction, he’s taught translation and adaptation at the Yale School of Drama for many years.

??Open to All Students
??Must Apply
?Must be able to attend every workshop!

Dates:

Monday, September 17th from 6:00 – 8:30 pm
Monday, October 15th from 6:00 – 8:30 pm followed by dinner
Monday, November 12th from 6:00 – 8:30 pm followed by reading a reading by James Magruder

Apply to Amy Bloom, abloom[at]wesleyan[dot]edu with cover letter expressing interest and experience and a sample of your work.

Date: Monday, September 17; Monday, October 15; Monday, November 12
Time: 6:00-8:30 PM

Unofficial Orientation Series 2018: First Year Classes

This is an update of wilk‘s update of Jackson‘s post from 2015, which was an update of skorn‘s post from 2014. Which was an update of DaPope‘s post from 2013. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, or some shit like that, right?

This is going to be a very familiar webpage for the next four years... use it wisely.

This is going to be a very familiar webpage for the next four years… use it wisely.

This is part of our 2018 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

I’m 99% sure you are brimming with excitement right now, dear young frosh — and you can’t wait to completely settle in on campus, and hopefully, you’re finding that orientation is pretty fun. You should be excited. There are also parties. And people. Ya gotta like the people.

But, of course, part of being interested in Wesleyan means also being interested in the classes that you will take at Wesleyan, and as a Real Life Wesleyan Student, there is a slight chance I can help you on that front.

Apply to be a Center for Prison Education Tutor

Check out the following tutoring opportunity from the Center for Prison Education!

The Center for Prison Education is now accepting applications for tutors for the 2018-2019 academic year. Tutors travel with CPE staff to Cheshire or York Correctional Institution for one three-hour study hall session each week for an entire semester, working individually with students on coursework in a wide range of disciplines. More information is available on the application form. Applications are due by Saturday, April 28th.

Stipends are available for work study students. Please contact cpefellow[at]wesleyan[dot]edu with any questions.

WesMaps 2018-2019 Is Live!

*poring. since when do memes have “proper” spelling/grammar??

As if you didn’t have enough to distract you from your studies (what with the bizzare “is-it-or-isn’t-it-gonna-snow?” weather, the Wesleyan Refugee Project’s Advocacy Week, having an existential crisis over Usdan’s “hummus,” or just trying to make it through the last week before our blissfully/irritatingly long Spring Break), WesMaps 2018-2019 is live!

While some of the offerings appear to be a bit more sparse than in years past (there’s only 9 courses listed for Anthropology in the fall………yikes), there’s still plenty to peruse as you procrastinate working on your midterms! We expect y’all to spend your breaks avidly reading all the listings so you can send us your nominations for the “Best of WesMaps: Fall 2018 Edition” (email your faves to staff[at]wesleying[dot]edu)!

Some quick reminders because I’m about to be a senior and am feeling all ~nostalgic~ that I only have a year left and also have made or witnessed plenty of mistakes that hopefully some of you youngins can learn from:

  • Be sure to check for POI deadlines so you don’t miss out on those famed 8:1 student-faculty ratio courses we all hear about but never actually get into because we can’t meet a deadline to save our own lives (oh wait, that’s just me???)
  • Try to find at least one course outside your major/gen-ed division that sounds fun! It’s nice to shake things up, and you’ll probably meet some cool people you never would have met otherwise (shout out to Lacrosse Land in astronomy)
  • Make a list of what sounds interesting now so that when prereg inevitably sneaks up on you when you have 7 papers and 3 exams (because doesn’t it always???) you have at least some idea what you want to do
  • Check your major/minor/thesis requirements now; your advisor will not point out that you are off track for graduation until it’s senior spring and you need 5 credits to graduate. This is one of those things you should check and double check and ask questions about every semester. Also pester your advisor to meet about prereg early and often! Nothing sucks more than not having your prereg run through the system because you couldn’t get your advisor to meet with you to approve your schedule…………. (what I’m not bitter that’s absurd)

Happy WesMaps! Happy Midterms (lol)! Happy browsing!