Category Archives: Culture

Film Series: The Face of Another

1966. Japan. Dir: Hiroshi Teshigahara. With Tatsuya Nakadai. 124 min. 35mm print!

Having lost his face in an accident, a businessman finds his wife growing callous and his life falling apart. Seeking vengeance, he obtains a new face in secret and re-enters his partner’s life. In this far-fetched thriller of unadulterated imaginations, Teshigahara unveils the ruthless make-up of social identities and modern lives.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Emily Johnson/Catalyst: Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter

From the the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN):

Join us by the fire for a gathering hosted by Emily Johnson/Catalyst that centers around Indigenous protocols and knowledges, as we welcome the evening with our campus community and neighbors. Come sit and gaze at the stars, and share stories, conversation and food (bring food to share if you wish—hot apple cider will be provided). Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter is a community gathering. It is a way of being and a way of making. It is research and process as ceremony. It is dance. Come join us.

Rain Location: Beckham Hall (no fire)

Kinstillatory Mappings is co-hosted by the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN). It was created with funding from The MAP Fund, supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Emily Johnson is an artist who makes body-based work. A Bessie Award winning choreographer, Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Doris Duke Artist Award she is based in New York City. Originally from Alaska, she is of Yup’ik descent and since 1998 has created work that considers the experience of sensing and seeing performance. Her dances function as installations, engaging audiences within and through a space and environment—interacting with a place’s architecture, history, and role in community. Emily is trying to make a world where performance is part of life; where performance is an integral connection to each other, our environment, our stories, our past, present, and future. Emily’s written work has been published and commissioned by Dance Research Journal(University of Cambridge Press); SFMOMA; Transmotion Journal,University of Kent; Movement Research Journal; Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; and the recent compilation Imagine d Theaters (Routledge), edited by Daniel Sack.

Her choreography is presented across the United States and Australia and most recently at Santa Fe Opera with Doctor Atomic, directed by Peter Sellars. Emily is a lead collaborator in the Indigenous-artist led Healing Place Collaborative (Minneapolis, MN), focused on the vital role of the Mississippi River in the life of residents along its path; she was an inaugural participant in the Headlands Center for the Arts’ Climate Change Residency, a member of Creative Change at Sundance, and served as a water protector at Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. As a facilitator she has worked with artists and communities most notably during TIME PLACE SPACE, NOMAD in Wotjobaluk Country, Australia and during UMYUANGVIGKAQ with PS122 on Manhahtaan in Lenapehoking, a durational Long Table/Sewing Bee focused on indigenizing the performing arts and the world at large.

Her most recent work, Then a Cunning Voice and A Night We Spend Gazing at Stars—an all night outdoor performance gathering taking place on and near eighty-four community-hand-made quilts—premiered in Lenapehoking (NYC) with PS122 on Randall’s Island in summer 2017 and will tour to Chicago, San Francisco, and Narrm (Melbourne), Australia. Currently, she hosts monthly bonfires on the Lower East Side in Mannahatta in partnership with Abrons Art Center and is, with colleagues in Australia and Canada, developing a Global First Nations Performance Network.

Date: Tuesday, October 9
Time: 6:30-8:30 PM
Place: CFA Courtyard (Rain Location: Beckham Hall)
Facebook Event

Lila Abu-Lughod, “Framing Islam: ‘Violent Extremism’ and the Rise of Securofeminism”

Professor Margot Weiss, Chair of the Anthropology Department writes in:

Please join us on Thursday for the Anthropology Annual Lecture with Lila Abu-Lughod, feminist anthropologist and premiere scholar of gender, Islam, global feminism, and Middle East politics.

In this talk, she will be sharing new work on the dangerous collusion between international women’s rights advocates and the global security enterprise called Countering Violent Extremism (CVE).

Check out Lila Abu-Lughod speaking with the New York Times about the gap between popular Western beliefs about “Muslim women” and the reality: https://www.nytimes.com/video/books/review/100000002617743/the-read-around-lila-abu-lughod.html

Lila Abu-Lughod is the Joseph L. Buttenweiser Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University and the author of seven books including Do Muslim Women Need Saving?, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society, Dramas of Nationhood: The Politics of Television in Egypt, and Nakba: Palestine, 1948, and the Claims of Memory.

Date: Thursday, October 11
Time: 4:30 PM
Place: Shanklin 107
Facebook Event

Film Series: The Palm Beach Story

1942. USA. Dir: Preston Sturges. With Claudette Colbert, Joel McCrea. 88 min.

This screwball comedy of love and mistaken identity follows a savvy housewife as she abandons her marriage in search of a wealthy man to wed, with her husband in hot pursuit. Sturges (The Lady Eve, Sullivan’s Travels) is at his best with this madcap mix of verbal sparring, physical humor, and outright zaniness.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family / Free

Film Series: Brokeback Mountain

2005. USA. Dir: Ang Lee. With Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal. 134 min.

Sheep herding in Wyoming may seem an unlikely place to find love, but Ennis and Jack share an attraction that won’t quit, enduring hardships, social burdens, and the passage of time. Groundbreaking performances anchor a canonical piece of American and Queer cinema that burns with a fierce and tender flame.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5

Film Series: Perfect Blue

1997. Japan. Dir: Satoshi Kon. With Junko Iwao. Animation. 81 min.

An adored pop star quits the biz to pursue acting and faces criticism from fans and friends alike that ferments into threats and stalking. In this violent psychosexual thriller, Kon (Paprika) braids eerie animation with inventive editing to wrap the viewer in a uniquely inescapable nightmare logic.

CW: sexual violence / simulated rape / stalking

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Cocote

2017. Dominican Republic. Dir: Nelson Carlo de Los Santos Arias. With Vincente Santos. 106 min.

Alberto, an evangelical Christian, returns home to discover his father was murdered by a local politician and, worse, Alberto is expected to avenge his death. He must deal with questions of faith, morality, and tradition in this cacophonous film which utilizes various film formats and aspect ratios to depict a community decimated by violence.

Sponsored by the Thomas and Catharine McMahon Fund, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Latin American Studies Program, and the College of Film and the Moving Image.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Submit to Reverberations Mag

Sage Marshall ’19 writes in:

Reverberations Mag is a two-year-old online publication for young people to respond to art in a personal manner. We’re based out of Wes and publish students/young writers from all of the country. We especially encourage members of the greater Middletown community to submit their work.

We publish 3 types of pieces, which you can learn more about in our submission guidelines: Reverberationsmag.com/submit. If you’d like to write for us, we are looking for staff writers. This entails writing for us once per month—which is really quite manageable as our “Fresh Thoughts” are only 200-500 words in length. If you are interested in this position, simply submit one piece in the next 2 weeks and let us know you’d like to be a staff writer. If you don’t have the time to become one of our staff writers, we welcome irregular submissions as well. Respond to the art in your life!

Email us with submissions or questions/concerns at reverberationsmag[at]gmail[dot]com

Date: Saturday, October 20
Time: 12:00 AM
Place: Submit to reverberationsmag[at]gmail[dot]com

Film Series: Il Posto

1961. Italy. Dir: Ermanno Olmi. With Sandro Panseri. 98 min. 35mm print!

To support his family a young man joins a large company in Milan, where he meets a woman in a similar situation; however, their relationship is strained by the soul-sucking nature of the modern workplace. Olmi explores the effects of a recently industrialized Italy on the younger generation in this touchingly subtle Neorealist coming-of-age tale.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Eighth Grade

2018. USA. Dir: Bo Burnham. With Elsie Fisher, Josh Hamilton. 94 min.

Burnham’s directorial debut captures the angst of middle school through the eyes of a painfully shy teenager navigating her final days of eighth grade. This honest portrait of the messy trials, triumphs, and tribulations of modern adolescence invites you to relive your awkward memories and congratulate your younger self for making it through to the other side.

This screening is held in conjunction with Project No Red Zone, a campaign to raise awareness of the first six weeks of school when students are most vulnerable to sexual assault and sexual violence.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5