Category Archives: Culture

Physical Plant Flushes Bidet Dreams Down The Toilet

Talk about an unusual request. On November 8, Senior and Program Housing Area Coordinator Alexia Thompson sent out this email to seniors in woodframe houses:

Hello Residents,

Please see message below from physical plant.

Physical Plant has noticed that bidets have been installed in some of the woodframe bathrooms.  This is extremely problematic, as they can lead to plumbing problems, and possibly flooding and damage to your belongings.  If there is a reason you need a bidet, please submit your request to the office of accessibility services, and if approved, Physical Plant will professionally install one for you.  Thank you for your cooperation.

Naturally, that got us here at Wesleying asking the important journalistic questions, such as Who installed the bidet? and How “extreme” is “extremely problematic”?? So we went looking for answers.

Film Series: Seven Samurai

1954. Japan. Dir: Akira Kurosawa. With Toshiro? Mifune. 207 min. 35mm print.


Kurosawa’s enduring classic depicts the methodical last stand of the masterless ronin hired to defend a village from a horde of robbers. The brisk, multifaceted narrative works a mix of tones, ranging from lighthearted gags to bitter cynicism to intense choreographed swordplay. Print courtesy of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Girls Trip

2017. USA. Dir: Malcolm D. Lee. With Regina Hall, Queen Latifah. 122 min.


A foursome of friends reconnect during a wild weekend at a music festival, filled with partying, hookups, and female empowerment. The first film with an all-black creative team to net over $100 million, GIRLS TRIP’s inspirational sisterhood and incisive commentary make it more than just another raunchy comedy.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5

Film Series: Sholay

1975. India. Dir: Ramesh Sippy. With Amitabh Bachchan, Dharmendra. 204 min.


A retired police chief enlists the help of two bandits to defeat a murderous crime lord, unleashing a campy current of action, melodrama, and – of course – musical numbers. At first considered a flop, Sholay has gained so much of a following that it may now be the highest grossing Hindi-language film of all time.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Princess Mononoke

1997. Japan. Dir: Hayao Miyazaki. With Yoji Matsuda. Animation. 134 min.


After a prince is poisoned in a wild boar attack, he goes in search of a forest god to heal him. En route he encounters an ongoing war between a mining town and an army of spirits, among them a mysterious wolfgirl. Miyazaki utilizes breathtaking animation and a fantastical story to level commentary at industrialization and environmental destruction.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5

Film Series: Thelma and Louise

1991. USA. Dir: Ridley Scott. With Susan Sarandon, Geena Davis. 130 min.


A duo of kickass women murder an unapologetic rapist, jump-starting a cross-country run from the law in which they smash the patriarchy at every pit stop. Monumental in its radical femininity, the film continually exalts its protagonists’ righteous fury and even turns an objectifying gaze on a gloriously shirtless Brad Pitt. Speaker: author Becky Aikman.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Special Free Preview Screening: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

2017. United States. Dir: Martin McDonagh. With Francis McDormand 115 min.


“Wielding righteous anger, fiery emotion, biting humor and an ornery manner right out of a Clint Eastwood Western, Frances McDormand unleashes 2017’s most indelible movie mom in the darkly comic crime drama.”
– Brian Truitt, USA Today

“Every performance in this movie acknowledges that while tragedy is what prompted the film’s events, its contours, characters, and conversations are pure, inky black comedy.”
– Alissa Wilkinson, Vox

“Not every speedbump given us by life teaches us tolerance. A daughter shouldn’t die at all, much less brutally. But what do we do with that knowledge? How do we channel our anger at an unjust world? “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” is one of those truly rare films that feels both profound and grounded; inspirational without ever manipulatively trying to be so.”
– Brian Tallerico, RogerEbert.com

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Meditation & Social Change with Lama Rod Owens

Join Lama Rod Owens, co-author of Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love and Liberation, teacher in the Tibetan tradition of Buddhism, activist/organizer, and poet for a discussion of the connection between personal and societal liberation. Owens writes and teaches about the intersection of Buddhism, identity, and social change, and he is considered to be one of the leaders of the next generation of Dharma teachers. The evening will begin with a guided meditation practice, and after a brief break for dinner (food will be provided), Owens will lecture and answer questions. All are welcome and encouraged to join, regardless of previous experience with meditation.

Date: Wednesday, November 8
Time: 5:30 PM
Place: Downey House Lounge

Film Series: Atomic Blonde

2017. USA/Germany/Sweden. Dir: David Leitch. With Charlize Theron. 115 min.


When a British agent in East Germany is killed and another deep cover spy is put on the back foot, Theron’s titular specialist is sent in to regroup, recover a Stasi informant, and beat the tar out of an army of secret police. This stylish, spine-breaking spy flick revels in the chaos (and fashion and music) of the last days of the Cold War.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5

UNPACKED: Refugee Baggage

When I walked into Artspace in New Haven, the studio was relatively empty except for a few people and the art pieces. Each piece tells the story of a refugee, both for the eyes and the ears.

Mohamad Hafez, an architect and artist, takes these stories and creates suitcases, each reflecting the refugee experience. He recreates the rooms, homes, and lives of those who have suffered the damage from war. Ahmed Badr ‘20 records these stories, and curates them. When viewing the pieces, you can put on the headphones hung beside the pieces and listen to these refugees recount their stories.

I put on a pair of headphones, and listened. Each detail has made it onto the pieces. They help show the disaster, but also the innate beauty that these spaces occupied. The small details that compose the entirety of the piece–– dents in car license plates, toys that have accumulated dust from the rubble–– further emphasize the reality of these stories. Within those few minutes, I felt like I was in each of these places: Syria, Iraq, Congo, Sudan, all war-torn and never to be entirely the same as they were before.

I took off my headphones and the room swelled with a familiar sound: prayers being read in Arabic. It was strange to be in a public space in America and hear Arabic prayers so loud and clear. In that moment, I was home, with my grandfather, who lived right next door to the masjid. This juxtaposition of space and time took me by surprise, particularly because I wasn’t quite expecting it. The Arabic has its home at home, and here I am exposed to that via television shows, but not such an open space. Nevertheless, the ambient sounds made the entire experience that much more impactful. Here I was, hearing a language so familiar to me, for the most part associated with happiness, and having it transformed to this moment, to something not necessarily happy, but to that of strength, of courage, and of a new life.

The project was created to humanize the refugee narrative, that the refugee crisis is not simply numbers and statistics, but rather human beings, each who hold their own experiences and stories to share to us.

If you missed out on the gallery, fear not, dear Wesleyan’er! Mohamad and Ahmed will be holding a WESeminar on Friday, November 3rd at 5 PM in Fisk 208.