Category Archives: Events

Thankful Dinner

From Haven Hall HM Jennifer Gagne ’19:

It’s that time of year again: time to start spending time with the ones you love. It doesn’t have to be family. Doesn’t have to be what everyone else thinks is traditional. Every day is your life and you deserve it. It’s also time to be thankful for those who have helped you, all of us, get to where you are today. Spend time with some of your fellow folks on break and celebrate with a dinner of gratitude and thankfulness with Haven Hall and Questbridge/First Class.

Date: Thursday, November 23 
Time: 6:30 – 9:00 PM
Place: Haven Hall, Nics 6 Basement

Film Series: Seven Samurai

1954. Japan. Dir: Akira Kurosawa. With Toshiro? Mifune. 207 min. 35mm print.


Kurosawa’s enduring classic depicts the methodical last stand of the masterless ronin hired to defend a village from a horde of robbers. The brisk, multifaceted narrative works a mix of tones, ranging from lighthearted gags to bitter cynicism to intense choreographed swordplay. Print courtesy of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Sholay

1975. India. Dir: Ramesh Sippy. With Amitabh Bachchan, Dharmendra. 204 min.


A retired police chief enlists the help of two bandits to defeat a murderous crime lord, unleashing a campy current of action, melodrama, and – of course – musical numbers. At first considered a flop, Sholay has gained so much of a following that it may now be the highest grossing Hindi-language film of all time.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Princess Mononoke

1997. Japan. Dir: Hayao Miyazaki. With Yoji Matsuda. Animation. 134 min.


After a prince is poisoned in a wild boar attack, he goes in search of a forest god to heal him. En route he encounters an ongoing war between a mining town and an army of spirits, among them a mysterious wolfgirl. Miyazaki utilizes breathtaking animation and a fantastical story to level commentary at industrialization and environmental destruction.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5

Concert: Kodomo // Kodacrome // Purple Windsounds

From Movement House:

Come by Movement House on Saturday night for an audiovisual show featuring some top notch visiting electronic artists. Live sets will be accompanied by programmed + projected visuals.

KODOMO
Kodomo is the electronic music project of Emmy Award-winning composer Chris Child. His work falls into the genres of ambient techno and IDM, sometimes veering into the experimental. His performance will focus on his most recent EP, Divider.
https://kodomo.bandcamp.com

KODACROME
Kodacrome is Elissa (vocals/synth) and Ryan (synth/drum machine). The pair crafts fragmented pop with a warm electronic pulse, featuring swells and lead lines which ring from synths and throats alike.
https://kodacrome.bandcamp.com

THE PURPLE WINDSOUNDS
Wesleyan’s own apocalyptic noise pop band performing what may be one of their last shows ever

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/509106319446814/

Date: Saturday, November 11
Time: 10pm
Place: Movement House

Film Series: Special Free Preview Screening: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

2017. United States. Dir: Martin McDonagh. With Francis McDormand 115 min.


“Wielding righteous anger, fiery emotion, biting humor and an ornery manner right out of a Clint Eastwood Western, Frances McDormand unleashes 2017’s most indelible movie mom in the darkly comic crime drama.”
– Brian Truitt, USA Today

“Every performance in this movie acknowledges that while tragedy is what prompted the film’s events, its contours, characters, and conversations are pure, inky black comedy.”
– Alissa Wilkinson, Vox

“Not every speedbump given us by life teaches us tolerance. A daughter shouldn’t die at all, much less brutally. But what do we do with that knowledge? How do we channel our anger at an unjust world? “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” is one of those truly rare films that feels both profound and grounded; inspirational without ever manipulatively trying to be so.”
– Brian Tallerico, RogerEbert.com

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Meditation & Social Change with Lama Rod Owens

Join Lama Rod Owens, co-author of Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love and Liberation, teacher in the Tibetan tradition of Buddhism, activist/organizer, and poet for a discussion of the connection between personal and societal liberation. Owens writes and teaches about the intersection of Buddhism, identity, and social change, and he is considered to be one of the leaders of the next generation of Dharma teachers. The evening will begin with a guided meditation practice, and after a brief break for dinner (food will be provided), Owens will lecture and answer questions. All are welcome and encouraged to join, regardless of previous experience with meditation.

Date: Wednesday, November 8
Time: 5:30 PM
Place: Downey House Lounge

David Vine, “What Are We Getting Out of This?”: U.S. Empire and the Military Overseas under Trump

From the Anthropology Department:

Join us for this interactive, conversational event with political anthropologist (and Wes alum!) David Vine ’97. Prof. Vine will discuss his ethnographic research on US military bases, the state of the US Empire, and the role of public anthropology. With a response by Prof. J. Kehaulani Kauanui.

David Vine is Associate Professor of Anthropology at American University. His books include Base Nation: How US Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World and Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military Base on Diego Garcia. His other writing has appeared in The New York Times, Guardian, and Mother Jones among others.

Date: Thursday, November 9
Time: 4:30-6:30 PM
Place: Downey 113

A Conversation with Chelsea Manning

Join Wesleyan Democratic Socialists, Wesleyan Students for Ending Mass Incarceration, Wesleyan American Civil Liberties Union, Ujamaa, Students for Justice in Palestine, United Student Labor Action Coalition, and Jewish Voice for Peace for a very special event with Chelsea Manning:

This talk will be a wide-ranging conversation between Chelsea Manning and moderator Professor Margot Weiss, Chair of the Anthropology Department. Ms. Manning and Professor Weiss will focus on the impact of current and emerging military, police, and national security tactics and technologies on Americans, the international community, and the environment. Additionally, they will focus on how Ms. Manning’s life and experiences have shaped her politics, and how queer and trans people are impacted by international systems of surveillance and militarism.

The talk will be ticketed to deal with crowding. Tickets will be free and available to pick up at the Wesleyan Box Office starting on Monday, November 6th. Security will be provided by Wesleyan Public Safety. Ticket checking will be provided by Usdan Event Staff.

This event is co-sponsored by the Wesleyan Student Assembly Student Budget Committee, the Green Fund, the Adelphic Education Fund, the Sociology Department, the Anthropology Department, the American Studies Department, Friends of the Wesleyan Library, Center for the Americas, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, the Office of Equity and Inclusion, and the Student Resource Center.

Date: Wednesday, November 15
Time: 7:00 – 9:00 PM
Place: Memorial Chapel
Cost: Free! (Tickets will be free and available to pick up at the Wesleyan Box Office starting on Monday, November 5th)
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