Category Archives: Events

Havdalah and Kaddish

From the Wesleyan Jewish Community:

Every week, the Jewish community comes together to do a short ceremony called havdalah, where we mark the end of Shabbat and the beginning of the new week. Today, we will also be saying kaddish, the mourner’s prayer, in honor of those who were killed in an act of antisemitism and white supremacy today in a synagogue in Pittsburgh. This will happen in the Bayit at 6:40pm. Please note that this ceremony will center the experiences of the Jewish community, including Jews by choice and Jews who don’t typically attend the havdalah ceremony.

Date: Saturday, October 27
Time: 6:40 PM
Place: The Bayit

Hike Mattabesett and Reservoir Loop Trails

Amanda Kenyon of the Rockfall Foundation writes in:

Join The Rockfall Foundation for a 2.6 mile hike on the Mattabesett and Reservoir Loop Trails in Middletown. Traverse around a beautiful reservoir plus a spur to several rocky overlooks. Moderate terrain at a fast pace, with a few steep rock scrambles. Must be comfortable with rocky ledges and hand-assisted scrambling.

Free. Non-members welcome. Experienced hikers only. No dogs, please. Bring sturdy hiking boots/shoes, snacks and water. Steady rain cancels.

Meet at 9:30 a.m. at the dirt lot at the intersection of routes 9, Randolph Rd. (route 155), and Coe Ave. (GPS: 41.534419, -72.617770). We will then carpool to the trailhead a mile away.

RSVP encouraged but not required to hike leader amanda@rockfallfoundation.org

Date: Saturday, November 3rd
Time: 9:30 AM
Location: The dirt lot at the intersection of routes 9, Randolph Rd.

All Campus Email: 2018 Campus Climate Survey Results & Opportunities for Feedback

Last Spring, the Office for Equity and Inclusion completed climate and culture surveys with both students and faculty/staff. This week, the results of this survey were emailed out to the campus community. The results of this survey—including the jarring statistic that “nearly half of staff respondents did not agree that Wesleyan’s review process rewards strong job performance”—come in the wake of yet another Title IX case filed against the university by a female faculty member, this time Former Assistant Professor of Physics Christina Othon.

In the survey results report itself, there are a several items of particular interest:

To Coup or Not to Coup When do Militaries Overthrow Democracies? (Free lunch)

Lecture by Sharan Grewal from Center of Middle East Policy at The Brookings Institution

After the Arab Spring, why did the Egyptian military overthrow its young democracy, while the Tunisian military supported its country’s transition? More generally, what motivates some militaries to stage coups against nascent democracies? By looking into the Tunisian and Egyptian cases and drawing upon over 100 high-level interviews and three surveys of military personnel, Sharan Grewal argues that the military’s decision is shaped by the relationship between former autocrats and their armies.

Date: Thursday, October 18
Time: 12 pm
Place: PAC 004

 

Become a volunteer docent!

Open Access Image from the Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University (photo: M. Johnston)

The Friends of the Davison Arts Center is looking for volunteer docents!

Every fall for over 40 years, the Friends of the Davison Arts Center brings more than 300 Middletown 4th graders to explore on-campus galleries as well as the Javanese Gamelan orchestra. Volunteer docents engage these students with the world of art, music, and architecture through hands-on activities, and become part of a great team alongside museum curators and educators.
No experience necessary! Docents should be enthusiastic, reliable, interested in the arts, comfortable working with kids and public speaking. Tours run October 18, 24, 25, 30 and November 1, 13, 14, 15 from 9:00 am – 12:30 pm.
All docents are required to commit to at least one shift and attend training on Monday, October 15 from 11:50 am -1:10 pm in the DAC. Lunch will be provided.
Interested?: Email Marisely Gonzalez, FDAC Docent Program Coordinator, marisely.wesleyan[at]gmail[dot]com
Date: Monday, October 15
Time: 11:50 AM-1:10 PM
Place: DAC

Pumpkin Fest!

It’s fall and you know what that means: Pumpkin Fest!

FREE and open to the public!

Grab your friends and family and join us at Long Lane Farm’s annual Pumpkin Fest, Saturday, October 13, 2018, from noon to 4 pm! Featuring live student bands, farm tours, crafts, baked goods for sale, a pie-eating contest, vendors & student groups, FREE veggie burgers and cider, and much more!

Visit wesleyan.edu/coe for more info. Sponsored by Long Lane Farm, the College of the Environment and Bon Appetit.

Rain date: Sunday, October 14, noon to 4 p.m.

Date: Saturday, October 13
Time: 12:00 PM-4:00 PM
Place: Long Lane Farm
Facebook Event

Emily Johnson/Catalyst: Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter

From the the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN):

Join us by the fire for a gathering hosted by Emily Johnson/Catalyst that centers around Indigenous protocols and knowledges, as we welcome the evening with our campus community and neighbors. Come sit and gaze at the stars, and share stories, conversation and food (bring food to share if you wish—hot apple cider will be provided). Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter is a community gathering. It is a way of being and a way of making. It is research and process as ceremony. It is dance. Come join us.

Rain Location: Beckham Hall (no fire)

Kinstillatory Mappings is co-hosted by the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN). It was created with funding from The MAP Fund, supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Emily Johnson is an artist who makes body-based work. A Bessie Award winning choreographer, Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Doris Duke Artist Award she is based in New York City. Originally from Alaska, she is of Yup’ik descent and since 1998 has created work that considers the experience of sensing and seeing performance. Her dances function as installations, engaging audiences within and through a space and environment—interacting with a place’s architecture, history, and role in community. Emily is trying to make a world where performance is part of life; where performance is an integral connection to each other, our environment, our stories, our past, present, and future. Emily’s written work has been published and commissioned by Dance Research Journal(University of Cambridge Press); SFMOMA; Transmotion Journal,University of Kent; Movement Research Journal; Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; and the recent compilation Imagine d Theaters (Routledge), edited by Daniel Sack.

Her choreography is presented across the United States and Australia and most recently at Santa Fe Opera with Doctor Atomic, directed by Peter Sellars. Emily is a lead collaborator in the Indigenous-artist led Healing Place Collaborative (Minneapolis, MN), focused on the vital role of the Mississippi River in the life of residents along its path; she was an inaugural participant in the Headlands Center for the Arts’ Climate Change Residency, a member of Creative Change at Sundance, and served as a water protector at Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. As a facilitator she has worked with artists and communities most notably during TIME PLACE SPACE, NOMAD in Wotjobaluk Country, Australia and during UMYUANGVIGKAQ with PS122 on Manhahtaan in Lenapehoking, a durational Long Table/Sewing Bee focused on indigenizing the performing arts and the world at large.

Her most recent work, Then a Cunning Voice and A Night We Spend Gazing at Stars—an all night outdoor performance gathering taking place on and near eighty-four community-hand-made quilts—premiered in Lenapehoking (NYC) with PS122 on Randall’s Island in summer 2017 and will tour to Chicago, San Francisco, and Narrm (Melbourne), Australia. Currently, she hosts monthly bonfires on the Lower East Side in Mannahatta in partnership with Abrons Art Center and is, with colleagues in Australia and Canada, developing a Global First Nations Performance Network.

Date: Tuesday, October 9
Time: 6:30-8:30 PM
Place: CFA Courtyard (Rain Location: Beckham Hall)
Facebook Event

Submit to Midriff Magazine!

From the editors of Midriff Magazine:

Submit to Wesleyan’s only womxn-centered publication! If you identify with womxnhood or femininity in any way, we want your writing (of all kinds), art, and anything else you can think of! Our meetings are Thursdays at 8 in PAC 104! Contact Steph (sades[at]wesleyan[dot]edu) or JR (jatkinson[at]wesleyan[dot]edu) with any questions, pitches, etc.! First draft deadline is 10/30, and final content deadline is 11/13!

Date: Thursdays
Time: 8:00 PM
Place: PAC 104
Submission Deadlines: Tuesday, October 30 (first draft) and Tuesday, November 13 (final content)

 

Eco-boardgame Night

Amanda Kenyon of the Rockfall Foundation writes in again:

The Rockfall Foundation hosts its first Eco Night at the deKoven House on 10/26. Try to save the world, green your power supply, grow some trees, or just make some risque green jokes. Drinks and snacks will be served! Games on hand include Catan: Oil Springs, Evolution: Climate, Wilted Green, Power Grid, Photosynthesis, Moai, Winds of Change, and Wildcraft. Email erik@rockfallfoundation.org if you have other game ideas.

Date: Friday, October 26th
Time: 6-10 PM
Location: The DeKoven House. 27 Washington St., Middletown.

Lila Abu-Lughod, “Framing Islam: ‘Violent Extremism’ and the Rise of Securofeminism”

Professor Margot Weiss, Chair of the Anthropology Department writes in:

Please join us on Thursday for the Anthropology Annual Lecture with Lila Abu-Lughod, feminist anthropologist and premiere scholar of gender, Islam, global feminism, and Middle East politics.

In this talk, she will be sharing new work on the dangerous collusion between international women’s rights advocates and the global security enterprise called Countering Violent Extremism (CVE).

Check out Lila Abu-Lughod speaking with the New York Times about the gap between popular Western beliefs about “Muslim women” and the reality: https://www.nytimes.com/video/books/review/100000002617743/the-read-around-lila-abu-lughod.html

Lila Abu-Lughod is the Joseph L. Buttenweiser Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University and the author of seven books including Do Muslim Women Need Saving?, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society, Dramas of Nationhood: The Politics of Television in Egypt, and Nakba: Palestine, 1948, and the Claims of Memory.

Date: Thursday, October 11
Time: 4:30 PM
Place: Shanklin 107
Facebook Event