Category Archives: Faculty

Chemistry Professor Emeritus David Beveridge Arrested for Animal Cruelty

Professor Emeritus David Beveridge who, until last Spring, was a full time faculty member in the Chemistry Department and the Molecular Biophysics certificate program, was arrested on Tuesday after his dog died in a hot car.

According to reports by NBC Connecticut and the Hartford Courant, Professor Beveridge intended to take his 3-year-old labradoodle Jennie to a doggie day care before he went into work. Instead, he went straight to work, forgetting to drop Jennie off first, and remembered 2.5 hours later. After remembering that he had forgotten to drop her off, he found the dog had passed in the intervening time.

Spring Faculty Dance Concert—“Shake”

Randi Plake writes in:

“Shake” is a rambunctious and tender duet born out of a nine-year friendship between Wesleyan Artist in Residence Iddi Saaka and Bates College Associate Professor of Dance Rachel Boggia. The world premiere of their first choreographed work features their shared love of vibratory movement, smooth breath, and cheesy humor; and influences including Ghanaian dance forms, American postmodern dance, fake tap dance, bad jokes, and life experiences.

Date: Friday, May 5th and Saturday, May 6th
Time: 8 PM
Place: CFA Theater

What’s Going On in the Film Department?

“There has long been an inequality of opportunity within the film industry, and we know diversifying the film industry begins within our education at Wesleyan.”

On March 28, students from the University’s College of Film and the Moving Image released a letter, along with a list of signatures and testimonies, expressing dissatisfaction with aspects of Wesleyan’s Film Studies department. The letter called for systematic changes to the ways in which the department operates, including hiring three tenure-track professors (prioritizing women and POC), offering more diverse courses within the department, and reforming disciplinary procedures so that they are less reliant on “blanket threats” to drop students from the major or drop their theses.

The letter, which has been in the works since February, was a collaboration between a group of current film students – both majors and minors – as well as prospective film students. Before it was put into wide circulation on March 28, the letter was shared amongst students and alumni of the Film Studies department, along with a call for signatures and personal testimonies to present to the CFILM faculty. (From email circulation and tabling in Usdan, the letter received 175 signatures and eight accompanying testimonies.)

Read the full letter and testimonies after the jump:

Screening of “Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA”

making a killingFrom the Center for Film Studies:

Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA examines how guns, and the billions of dollars made from them, affect the lives of everyday Americans. It exposes the ways powerful gun companies and the NRA are resisting responsible legislation for the sake of profit. Producer Tara Vajra ’10 will host a Q&A after the screening.

Date: Tomorrow – Tuesday, March 7th
Time: 8pm
Place: The Center for Film Studies

Artful Lunch Series: Rhea Higgins

WESCFARandi Plake writes in:

One artwork, one speaker, fifteen minutes. Join the Friends of the Davison Art Center for a presentation by Rhea Higgins, Adjunct Professor of Art History at the Hartford Art School, University of Hartford about her favorite work in the Davison Art Center collection. Bring your bag lunch and enjoy homemade cookies and conversation following the talk.

Date: Thursday, March 2nd
Time: 12:10pm
Place: Alsop House Dining Room in the Davison Art Center

Reading by Novelist Susan Choi

susan-choiFrom Quinn Frenzel ’16:

On Wednesday, February 15, 8:00 pm, at Russell House, the Wesleyan University English Department will host a reading by Millet writing fellow Susan Choi. Susan Choi studied literature at Yale and writing at Cornell, and worked for several years as a fact-checker for The New Yorker. Her first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. Her third novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. In 2010 she was named the inaugural recipient of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, she lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Date: Wednesday, February 15th
Time: 8-10pm
Place (UPDATED): Russell House Memorial Chapel

Date Change for Eli Clare, Annual Disability Studies Lecture!

Eli ClareFrom Professor Margot Weiss:

RESCHEDULED FROM STORM: Please join us Monday, February 13th at 4:30pm in Russell House to hear writer, activist, and poet Eli Clare read from his just-out-yesterday book Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure (Duke University Press 2017). Combining memoir, history, and cultural analysis, Brilliant Imperfection explores the deeply held belief that body-minds considered broken need to be fixed. Taking neither an anti- nor pro-cure position, Clare weaves together race, disability, sexuality, class, gender, and environmental politics to uncover the value of body-mind difference.

Date: Monday, February 13th
Time: 4:30-6PM
Place: Russell House

“The Hell, NSM?” — New Data on Representation in STEM at Wesleyan

exley

NSM: (Natural Science and Mathematics)

With light to the recent NYT article about the 1% 17% that exists on Wesleyan’s campus, we’ve been focused on statistics. While analyzing Wesleyan’s financial assets is incredibly important and necessary to discuss class and privilege, we must also remember that there are many factors that affect student performance; the NSM Coalition—a combination of Student Underrepresented in STEM (SUSS), Wesleyan Women in Science (WesWIS), Wesleyan Mathematics and Science Scholars Program (WesMaSS), and McNair undergraduate students partnering with graduate students, staff, faculty, and administrators—collected data specifically for students in STEM, and let me tell you, they are freaking terrifying.

The percentages, collected by the Office of Institutional Research, show how class not only affects our ability to even go to Wesleyan, but also how it affects our performance: it cannot be stressed enough how important this conversation is for the Wes community.

University Plans to Conduct Title IX Assessment With Victim Rights Law Center

wu

This morning at around 9:15, Vice President for Equity & Inclusion and Title IX Officer Antonio Farias sent out a campus-wide email, announcing that the University will be conducting a Title IX policy review this semester in partnership with the Victim Rights Law Center. Three representatives from VRLC – Lindy Aldrich, Amanda Walsh, and Candi N. Smiley – will be on campus February 8-9 to host panel discussions and Q&As with faculty members, class deans, and student representatives (you can view bios of the representatives and a full schedule of the panels here). A full report is expected to be completed and made publicly available by late March or early April.

The news follows several months of high-profile controversy surrounding Scott Backer, the former Associate Dean of Students, whose history as a sexual predator was only made public due to an investigative report by the Boston Globe. Last semester was marked by multiple student protests over how Wesleyan handles sexual assault cases and faculty accountability; at an open forum, students expressed their wish for Farias and President Michael Roth to be removed from office. A number of faculty members expressed their own disappointment at the University’s Title IX policy by sending an open letter to the Argus, demanding that faculty sexual harassment cases required independent review by an outside party.

Read Farias’ full email and more information on the VRLC after the jump: