Category Archives: Faculty

wtf is @mroth78 doing?????????

While at our penultimate* meeting of the semester, we were scrolling through our twitter tl looking for some ~cool content~ to retweet from our fellow students we came across THIS RIDONCULOUS TWEET:


As we tweeted: “what the fukc?????”

Other followers of his also responded to the tweet:

We don’t know how to end this post, so we’ll just leave you with the words of our fearless leader: “What do I do?”

All Campus Email: Changes in Course Re-Take and Incomplete Policies

As #FinalsSzn rapidly approaches/has already begun for many of us, Wesleyan has implemented some new policies which may impact how you address academic challenges this semester and in the future.

This afternoon, Dean for Academic Advancement Louise Brown in Student Affairs sent out an email detailing some changes to academic policies. If you haven’t been keeping a close eye on WSA agendas and committee reports (which are emailed out to the student body prior to weekly Sunday night meetings), you may have been caught off-guard by these seemingly sudden changes to policies that many students don’t even know exist. I do read all the WSA emails (bc I’m a big dork and like to look for fun things to report about), so I was vaguely aware of the new re-take policy, but I had no idea that the incomplete policy was changing.

Here’s a breakdown of what changed, what didn’t, and what it means for students and professors:

Theory Certificate Presents “Genealogies of Emergency”

Professor Matthew Garrett writes in:

The Certificate in Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory presents Professor Siraj Ahmed (CUNY), who will speak about his recent book Archaeology of Babel: The Colonial Foundation of the Humanties. Professor Ahmed explores the unexpected ways in which historical studies remain in thrall to colonial paradigms of knowledge, and he argues for an alternative approach rooted in the lives and languages that have been erased or distorted. His lecture focuses on traditions of the oppressed and the nameless.

Date: Wednesday, November 15
Time: 4:30-6 PM
Place: Downey 113

Apply to Writing and Drawing Comics!

From Professor Katzenstein:

Apply to Writing and Drawing Comics!

This is an intensive workshop course for students interested in making comics. We will read comic strips and books that vary widely in genre and style, and learn to identify and emulate cartooning techniques.

There will be short weekly exercises to get students comfortable working with words and images: single panel cartoons, four panel comic strips, a “master’s copy” of another cartoonist’s work. Students will make a 5-10 page comic for their midterm, and a 10-20 page comic for their final.

The deadline to apply has been extended to Friday, November 16! To apply for this course students should submit an example of work that includes both words and images, 2-5 pages in length to jason.adam.katzenstein[at]gmail[dot]com. In person interviews will take place on Thursday, November 8 on campus, but Skype interviews can also be arranged.

Date: Friday, November 16
Time: 5 PM

All Campus Email: 2018 Campus Climate Survey Results & Opportunities for Feedback

Last Spring, the Office for Equity and Inclusion completed climate and culture surveys with both students and faculty/staff. This week, the results of this survey were emailed out to the campus community. The results of this survey—including the jarring statistic that “nearly half of staff respondents did not agree that Wesleyan’s review process rewards strong job performance”—come in the wake of yet another Title IX case filed against the university by a female faculty member, this time Former Assistant Professor of Physics Christina Othon.

In the survey results report itself, there are a several items of particular interest:

Lila Abu-Lughod, “Framing Islam: ‘Violent Extremism’ and the Rise of Securofeminism”

Professor Margot Weiss, Chair of the Anthropology Department writes in:

Please join us on Thursday for the Anthropology Annual Lecture with Lila Abu-Lughod, feminist anthropologist and premiere scholar of gender, Islam, global feminism, and Middle East politics.

In this talk, she will be sharing new work on the dangerous collusion between international women’s rights advocates and the global security enterprise called Countering Violent Extremism (CVE).

Check out Lila Abu-Lughod speaking with the New York Times about the gap between popular Western beliefs about “Muslim women” and the reality: https://www.nytimes.com/video/books/review/100000002617743/the-read-around-lila-abu-lughod.html

Lila Abu-Lughod is the Joseph L. Buttenweiser Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University and the author of seven books including Do Muslim Women Need Saving?, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society, Dramas of Nationhood: The Politics of Television in Egypt, and Nakba: Palestine, 1948, and the Claims of Memory.

Date: Thursday, October 11
Time: 4:30 PM
Place: Shanklin 107
Facebook Event

Theory Certificate presents “The Illusion of Equality”

From Professor Matthew Garrett:

The Certificate in Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory presents:
“The Illusion of Equality in Kantian Cosmopolitanism”

Jameliah Bournahou (Georgia College and College of the Holy Cross)

This talk is co-sponsored by the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program.

Some scholars argue that Kant is universally egalitarian because in the essay “Toward Perpetual Peace” (1795), Kant offers new provisions that displace the racist views that he previously held in the essays on race of the 1780s. This argument presumes that Kant’s cosmopolitan philosophy is synonymous with universal egalitarianism because it is understood to be opposed to inequality. Professor Bournahou argues that Kant’s cosmopolitan philosophy is not universally egalitarian and in fact allows for inequality. Bournahou refers to a lesser recognized discussion Kant has in “Toward Perpetual Peace” where he argues that the cosmopolitan goal is to unify the nations and not the moral improvement of the species which would presumably establish universal egalitarianism.

Date: Tuesday, October 2
Time: 4:30-6:00 PM
PlaceDowney 113

All Campus Email: Daniel Handler Withdraws as Commencement Speaker, Anita Hill to Speak

Around 4 PM today, President Roth sent out an email update notifying campus that Daniel Handler ’92 has stepped down from delivering the Commencement Speech for the Class of 2018. Dr. Anita Hill will instead be delivering the address at the event.

This decision follows Sarah Chen Small ’18‘s write-in as well as the her leading a student response which involved #CancelHandler posters put around campus earlier this week. This is a great example of how student activism can pressure the administration to check their actions. Honestly, this is amazing.

Read past the jump for the full text of the email:

Write-In: “Commencement 2018: Lemony Snicket, Anita Hill, and Silencing Women of Color in the Age of #MeToo”

On February 15th, President Roth emailed an announcement of this year’s commencement speakers and Honorary Degree Recipients. The 186th Commencement Address will be delivered by Daniel Handler ’92, also known under his pen name Lemony Snicket. Fellow degree recipients are Anita Hill, Professor of Social Policy, Law, and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Brandeis University, and Joshua Boger ’73, scientist and chair emeritus of the Wesleyan Board of Trustees. Commencement will be Sunday, May 27, 2018.

The decision has sparked conversation among students, both in light of Handler’s past controversial remarks and the ongoing #MeToo movement, for which Anita Hill laid the foundation when, in 1991, she testified against Clarence Thomas’s Supreme Court nomination on the basis of sexual harassment. Sarah Chen Small ’18 has written in with a response to the commencement decisions, which you view below along with President Roth’s original announcement email:

West African Drumming and Dance Concert

From the CFA:

Featuring choreographer and Artist in Residence Iddi Saaka joined by his students, guest artists, and drummers, this invigorating performance showcases the vibrancy of West African cultures through their music and dance forms.

Date: Friday, December 1
Time: 8 PM
Place: Crowell Concert Hall
Cost: $6 Wesleyan students, youth under 18; $8 all others