Category Archives: Featured

Middletown Mayor Dan Drew Announces He’s Running for Governor of Connecticut

“Inequality is not inevitable. It is the consequence of bad decisions.” – Dan Drew

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[Updated 1/13/16, 9AM] An earlier version of this article incorrectly reported that Mayor Drew was up for re-election this year. He is actually up for re-election in 2019, after the gubernatorial race.

There’s big news in the town that many of us good students share and call home for 6 months out of the year! Middletown Mayor Dan Drew announced earlier today that he was establishing an exploratory committee to run for governor. He is currently serving his 3rd term as Middletown’s mayor, and will look to take over from current governor Dannel P. Malloy, a democrat whose current approval rating sits at 24%, and who consistently ranks as one of the least popular governors in America. Read past the jump for Mayor Drew’s announcement video and more about ~local politics~.

Food/Study/Exercise Hours for the Frozen Wesleyan Wasteland

This picture courtesy of Wesleying circa Jan. 2013, a good reminder that it’s always been cold as shit here.

This is the first time I’ve been at Wes for the majority of January, and I like it so far — campus is very quiet, the snow is nice to look at, and a squirrel just climbed its way frantically down my window. But I also haven’t gone outside yet, so this opinion will probably change very soon.

Whether you’re here for thesis work, winter session, winter sports, or just kickin’ it, campus will be nice and relatively unpopulated for the next couple of weeks. You can have Olin almost all to yourself! (Except avoid the fourth floor, maybe. According to kitabit’s a “frozen wasteland.”)

If you’re here, Usdan is your best on-campus dining option (Neon Deli is also open, as is Nardelli’s, and basically every other Middletown dining joint). Usdan’s open with limited service for lunch and dinner until regular hours resume on January 25th. If you purchased a meal plan for winter session, you can use your meals. Otherwise, you can use cash, Middletown cash, or credit card (your meal plan points from last semester don’t work until 1/25, unfortunately). Usdan resumes full dinner service on January 25th, which is also when Weshop, Red & Black, and Weswings all reopen. Full dining hours here:

2016: A Very Wesleying Year in Review

“Like, I feel like every year has a new energy, and I feel like this year is really about, like, the year of just realizing stuff. And everyone around me, we’re all just, like, realizing things.” – Kylie Jenner, 1/1/16

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This article was a collaboration with claire.

The talk among popular circles on the Internet is that 2016 was the year of endless fuckery. Certainly, there is much to be alarmed about: Brexit, having a reality TV star command a nuclear arsenal, the bizarre state of affairs in South Korea, the ongoing horrors in Syria, etc. Our commitment to decontextualizing and compiling suffering in order to demonize an arbitrary unit of time is alarming in and of itself.

A lot of shit went down at Wesleyan this year, too, and we don’t want to fall into the same trap of decontexualizing. Still, we want to revisit some of the happenings in the Wesleyan (and Wesleying) world in the past year. As I said last year, we do this list each year for three reasons: (1) institutional memory is shit at colleges, (2) synergy, and (3) lists are cool.

You can read past Year in Reviews here: 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015.

Now a disclaimer: These issues are not ranked with any criteria in mind, they are simply numbered for the sake of numbering. Also, there are lots of things that happen on this campus that we don’t manage to write about. As this is a review of our coverage, there will necessarily be things missing, and many of the happenings/issues included here are still developing and are certainly not over. So, if you think we missed something important, or hear of any recent developments in what we did include, leave a comment or email us at staff[at]wesleying[dot]org.

2007: A Very Wesleying Year in Review (feat. Zach Schonfeld)

2016? What’s 2016? What is Aleppo? What’d I miss?

Whatever, it’s done. Gone. Finished. As we wrap up this miserable dumpster fire of a year and head into 2016 Part 2 2017, let’s take a look back at the best and worst that happened these past twelve months.

Or not, because that would be terrible. And besides which, plenty of other, more qualified hubs of journalistic integrity are doing the exact same thing. For now, let’s instead reflect on a much simpler time. Like…2007. Because that’s a totally unique idea.

(Yes, we will eventually be getting to our real 2016 year-in-review.)

To refresh us all on what was going on in 2007, I emailed our former editor and fearless leader Zach Schonfeld ’13. Our time-warping exchange went like this:

Procrastination Destination: 4, 5, and 6 Year Olds Rock and Adults Suck

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While scrolling through Facebook recently, I came across this clip from a British TV show called The Secret Life of 4, 5, and 6 Year Olds. Essentially, the show follows some kids in their preschool. As the kids interact, hidden cameras are catching what they say. Then, a group of developmental psychologists tunes in to the footage, commenting on the significance of the kids’ actions.

Procrastination Destination: Anime Music Videos

I took this as a sign that, during finals week, I was meant to write 1200 words on weird musical anime videos.

I took this as a sign that, during finals week, I was meant to write 1200 words on weird musical anime videos.

Part of the beauty of the internet (for all its ugly features) is how its many oddities and curiosities can exist online and nowhere else, only venturing outside into the real world once they’ve been shared as a meme enough times. But what might be considered just a weird cyber trend in some circles may be a huge cultural phenomenon in others. Take Japanese game shows, for instance. Or, another transplant from Japan: anime music videos.

Oh, so like Gorillaz? Or that Daft Punk movie? Not exactly. Often referred to as AMVs, these videos that can be found all over YouTube are not “official” by any means. They aren’t made or commissioned by Japanese animation studios, nor are they promotional videos for the songs/artists featured in them. By their definition, AMVs are 100% fan-made. And yet, for some, they’ve ascended to the status of high art.

“Don’t Let the Smiles Melt Away with the Snow”: an Interview with Toys Koomplee ’17

toys-and-waffleIt’s finals and the beginning of three months of cold grey hell, so most of us are settling in to a period of grim, grouchy seasonal affective disorder. It’s also been a nightmarish year, and thus especially hard to find the bright side of anything. We Wesleying editors may be masters of cynicism and snark, but we still appreciate some kind-hearted positivity. Read after the jump for an interview with Toys Koomplee ’17, who might be the nicest, least jaded Wes person we (virtually) know.

Remembering Claire Randall ’12

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The past few days have been laden with sadness for many in the greater Wesleyan community. Over the weekend, news of the passing of Claire Randall ’12 came to us and the rest of the Wesleyan community. Claire lost her life in an act of gun violence last Thursday. Rather than repost details of her death, we wanted to include a few things to remember her by.

Claire grew up in Rhode Island where she attended Mt. Hope High School. She was valedictorian of her high school class and graduated from Wesleyan with a major in Music, focusing in ethnomusicology and jazz studies. At Wes, she was a member of New Group and she starred in a mockumentary web series called WANNABES. During her time at Wes, she was also part of a 14-piece band called Mad Wow. After graduation, she joined alumni artists Jess Best [’14] and Trot Fox as a vocalist. She also worked in New York City for Resonant Motion, a nonprofit that focused on facilitating the creation of music that “has a profound capacity to inspire people towards personal growth, strength and transformation and to and educate people about issues important to their world.”

Unfortunately, I never had the pleasure of knowing Claire, but I truly wish I had. Here are a few things Claire gave to the world in her short time here: