Category Archives: Film

Film Series: Perfect Blue

1997. Japan. Dir: Satoshi Kon. With Junko Iwao. Animation. 81 min.

An adored pop star quits the biz to pursue acting and faces criticism from fans and friends alike that ferments into threats and stalking. In this violent psychosexual thriller, Kon (Paprika) braids eerie animation with inventive editing to wrap the viewer in a uniquely inescapable nightmare logic.

CW: sexual violence / simulated rape / stalking

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Cocote

2017. Dominican Republic. Dir: Nelson Carlo de Los Santos Arias. With Vincente Santos. 106 min.

Alberto, an evangelical Christian, returns home to discover his father was murdered by a local politician and, worse, Alberto is expected to avenge his death. He must deal with questions of faith, morality, and tradition in this cacophonous film which utilizes various film formats and aspect ratios to depict a community decimated by violence.

Sponsored by the Thomas and Catharine McMahon Fund, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Latin American Studies Program, and the College of Film and the Moving Image.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Il Posto

1961. Italy. Dir: Ermanno Olmi. With Sandro Panseri. 98 min. 35mm print!

To support his family a young man joins a large company in Milan, where he meets a woman in a similar situation; however, their relationship is strained by the soul-sucking nature of the modern workplace. Olmi explores the effects of a recently industrialized Italy on the younger generation in this touchingly subtle Neorealist coming-of-age tale.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Eighth Grade

2018. USA. Dir: Bo Burnham. With Elsie Fisher, Josh Hamilton. 94 min.

Burnham’s directorial debut captures the angst of middle school through the eyes of a painfully shy teenager navigating her final days of eighth grade. This honest portrait of the messy trials, triumphs, and tribulations of modern adolescence invites you to relive your awkward memories and congratulate your younger self for making it through to the other side.

This screening is held in conjunction with Project No Red Zone, a campaign to raise awareness of the first six weeks of school when students are most vulnerable to sexual assault and sexual violence.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / $5

Film Series: Monterey Pop

1968. USA. Dir: D.A. Pennebaker. Documentary. 79 min.

The godfather of cinéma-vérité gives you front row seats to moments that have become rock ‘n roll legend: Pete Townshend busting his guitar, Jimi Hendrix burning his, and Mama Cass watching Janis Joplin in awe. The wildly diverse lineup includes Simon & Garfunkel, Otis Redding, and Ravi Shankar, who mentored The Beatles.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Zama

2017. Argentina. Dir: Lucrecia Martel. With Daniel Giménez Cacho. 115 min.

In this hauntingly humorous indictment of imperialism, a Spanish functionary falls into existentialist despair while pining for a promotion. Martel’s uniquely dreamlike style builds an atmosphere of simultaneous dread and wonder that captures the frustrating cruelty of the colonial experience. Also features the best performance by a llama in film history.

Sponsored by the Thomas and Catharine McMahon Fund, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Latin American Studies Program, and the College of Film and the Moving Image.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Los Angeles Plays Itself

2003. USA. Dir: Thom Anderson. Documentary. 169 min.

“Los Angeles may be the most photographic city, but it’s one of the least photogenic.” Anderson’s cinematic essay extricates fragments of the city from movies across decades and regroups them into an exploration of reality and representation. Extensive film footage reveals the architecture, urban landscapes, and, eventually, the people of Los Angeles.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Summer 1993

2017. Spain. Dir: Carla Simón. With Laia Artigas, Paula Robles. 97 min.

Six-year-old Frida gets sent to live in the countryside with her uncle and his family after her mother passes away. Her grief makes her an outsider to her family, a child forced to deal with grown-up emotions in order to heal. The film’s quiet nature is captivating and emotionally moving, with a lead child performance that will bring you to tears.

Sponsored by the Thomas and Catharine McMahon Fund, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Latin American Studies Program, and the College of Film and the Moving Image.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Dreamgirls

Girl group The Dreamettes finally get their big break: they are discovered by an ambitious car salesman and catapult to the top of the ’60s Motown scene. Along the way the group experiences the dark side of fame, and when Queen Bey steals the spotlight and becomes a star – sound familiar? – everything changes, and unforgettably heart-wrenching musical moments follow.

2006. USA. Dir: Bill Condon. With Beyoncé, Jennifer Hudson. 130 min.

Girl group The Dreamettes finally get their big break: they are discovered by an ambitious car salesman and catapult to the top of the ’60s Motown scene. Along the way the group experiences the dark side of fame, and when Queen Bey steals the spotlight and becomes a star – sound familiar? – everything changes, and unforgettably heart-wrenching musical moments follow.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: Dangal

2016. India. Dir: Nitesh Tiwari. With Aamir Khan, Fatima Sana Shaikh. 161 min.

A former wrestler challenges the stigmas of his village by training his daughters into world-class brawlers. After all, “a gold medal is a gold medal, whether it’s a boy or a girl.” Deftly combining the sentimentality of Bollywood and the realism of parallel cinema, this sports biopic has won the hearts of millions across the world.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free