Category Archives: History

Did You Ever Write a Paper About Wesleyan? Send It to Us!

This past finals week (or in any semester prior tbh), did you write a paper about Wesleyan? I frequently stumble down the WesScholar rabbit hole at inopportune times and procrastinate by reading about the history of coeducation at Wesleyan or University partnerships in urban renewal in Middletown. I may be desperately alone in this, but I’d like to think that I’m not.

I was thinking it would be cool to have a more extensive aggregation of student scholarship about Wesleyan and so I was like “Let me find all of the WesScholar theses about Wesleyan and then ask the aether.”

THESISCRAZY 2017 (PART 9): Triple Double Trouble

“Like, fuck academic excellence. Honestly.”

This afternoon we’ve got a triple double-feature for you: three great interviews, each with two great thesis-writers in their final stages of bewilderment, stress, and manic laughter! You can also read back on parts 1-8  here, here, hereherehereherehere, and here and you can find the entire archive here.

Enjoy the triple double-feature after the jump!

THESISCRAZY 2017 (PART 6): In Case One Thesis Just Isn’t Enough…

“My advisor is like, ‘You have time to figure that out!’ and I’m like, ‘I don’t feel like that is the case!’”

with my editor privileges i would like to interject here that this is the timeline of hawai?i history in my carrel that i made entirely out of post-it notes, with events color coded by type. —maya, 4/17/17 1:23 PM

What a knockout group of THESISCRAZY seniors to start off your Monday morning! In today’s installment, we have one of our fearless editors, a double-thesis-writer, housemates, and more! You can catch up with our past THESISCRAZY 2017 posts here, here, here, and here, and here, and you can find the entire archive here.

Prepare to be blown away after the jump!

Senior Recital by Rachel Rosenman ’17

WESCFAThe CFA writes in:

A senior music recital by Rachel Rosenman ’17, “The Music of Mel Bonis.” As a Catholic woman writing music in late nineteenth-century France, Mel Bonis faced unique challenges that influenced her compositions. Despite the difficulties she faced, Ms. Bonis produced over 300 compositions throughout multiple genres. After her death, much of her music was unfortunately forgotten until the late 1990s, when the composer’s descendants began serious efforts to research her life and work. Ms. Bonis’ music is still not well known, especially outside of her native France. As part of thesis work by Rachel Rosenman in Music and French Studies, this recital presents chamber music by Mel Bonis that showcases her music style, revealing unique works by a lesser-known woman composer.

Date: Wednesday, April 5
UPDATED Time: 7PM **4:30 PM**
Place: Department of Romance Languages and Literatures (300 High St)

College of Letters Open House

College of Letters lecture, Nov. 15, 2012.

Emily Furnival ’18 writes in: 

Have you ever wondered whether the College of Letters just studies the alphabet for three years? Never heard of the College of Letters? Like reading, writing, OR talking? Come to the COL Open House to get answers to all (we do mean all) of your questions! Talk to students and faculty to understand what the major is and whether it’s right for you.

The College of Letters is the interdisciplinary study of European Literature, History, Philosophy & Foreign Language. Through this program you will study with a small cohort of peers and two professors each semester. It’s a three year major and applications are due March 27th, so come by with questions!

Date: Monday and Tuesday, February 27-28th
Time: 4:30pm
Where: College of Letters Library (41 Wyllys, 3rd Floor)

Audition for Aporia!

The Gospel Truth

Miranda Hoyt-Disick ’19 writes in:

We’re back!
If you liked the staged-reading, you’ll love our fully-fledged production of this original student-written musical advised by none other than Lin Manuel Miranda 02’s writing partner, Professor Quiara Hudes.

Synopsis: In ancient Greece, The wise-talking Protaginus travels to Athens to trick wealthy patrons out of their money, only to fall for the wrong girl and become embroiled in an epic (rap) battle of rhetoric in the process. This wry, musical throwback explores competing theories of philosophy that we still debate in 2016, indulging in a kickline or two along the way.

What you should bring: 16 bars of your favorite song and a monologue (or joke, or just really funny story) to help us get to know you.

Callbacks will be Sunday, January 28th, same time, same place.

Written by: Zach Ezer ’17 and Eli Maskin ’17
Directed by: Miranda Hoyt-Disick
contact Miranda Hoyt-Disick at mhoytdisick[at]wesleyan[dot]edu with any questions.

Date: Friday and Saturday, January 27-28
Time: 4:30-6:30pm
Place: Alpha Delt (we’ll let you in–picking locks is not part of your audition. But if you can do that let us know cause that’s cool and useful)

Artist talk by Nancy Ottmann Albert – “Documents in Black and White”

hillcrest-orchardsNancy Ottmann Albert (MALS ’94) will speak about her photographic exhibition “Documents in Black and White,” currently on display in the Special Collections & Archives exhibit cases. The works are selected from the Nancy Ottmann Albert Collection, which she recently donated to Wesleyan, and span the thirty years she spent documenting New England’s built environment. In 1981, inspired by Walker Evans and the FSA photographers, Albert began to photograph textile mills and industrial sites throughout New England. She returned over the years to record their decline and disappearance, shooting black and white film in a medium format camera. Further exploration led her to seek out other endangered structures and landscapes. These include mental institutions emptied by changing philosophies of treatment and a commissioned study of Long River Village, Middletown’s oldest housing project, prior to its demolition. The exhibition also contains images of roadside and urban vernacular architecture; barns and abandoned homesteads; filling stations; drive-in theaters. All of the work, which includes gelatin silver photographs, was printed by the artist. The exhibition will be open through Friday, December 16, 2016.

The talk and event are free and open to the public. Co-sponsored by Special Collections & Archives, Wesleyan Library, and the Friends of the Wesleyan Library. For more information, email libfriends[at]wesleyan[dot]edu.

Date: Friday, October 28
Time: 7:00 PM
Place: 
Develin Room, 2nd floor, Olin Library

Anarchist Histories and Activism

From the American Studies Department:

Come hear Wesleyan students publicly present their research from the American Studies course, Anarchy in America: From Haymarket to Occupy Wall Street, taught by Professor of American Studies J. Kehaulani Kauanui. The course focused on anarchism as a political philosophy and practice—a little known aspect of American culture and society. Students examined select aspects of anarchist political thought and praxis in the United States and the ways that anarchism has been represented positively, vilified, or dismissed. The class included histories, philosophies and theories, and activism; it explored a range of diverse political traditions including individualist anarchism, socialist anarchism, anarcha-feminism, black anarchism, queer anarchism, indigenous influences and critiques, and other schools of thought. Professor Kauanui will moderate the following two panels.

10 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Historical Genealogies & Radical Analysis

“Free Love, Motherhood, and Spiritism: Reading Anarchy Through the Writings of Luisa Capetillo,” Iryelis López ’17
“Love as Prefigurative Politics: A Critical Examination of the Revolutionary Potentials of Non-Monogamy,” Sarah Lurie ’17
“Black Feminist Resonances: The Overlaps and Intersections With Anarchist Principles,” Kaiyana Cervera ’19

Noon to 1:30 p.m. Community Resistance and Diverse Forms of Direct Action

“Encrypted But Not Cryptic: An Intro to Crypto Anarchy and Practical Resistance of the Modern Surveillance State,” Kate Pappas ’18
“Threads of Anarchism: A Look at Flint Community Action Amidst a State Crime,” Aura Ochoa ’17
“Power to the People! Energy Democracy and the Socialization of our Energy Infrastructure,” Joshua Nodiff ’19

Date: Saturday, October 1
Time: 10AM-1PM
Place: Russell Library (NOT Russell House!), 123 Broad Street, Middletown, CT 06457

“Are We Better Than Our Predecessors? Toward a New Era of Progress” — a Constitution Day talk by Middletown Mayor Dan Drew

From the Friends of the Wesleyan Library:

In this talk, Mayor Drew will explore the erroneous assumptions that we are more advanced than preceding generations and what we can do to focus ourselves toward a future predicated on progressive social and economic advancement. A Q&A with the Mayor will follow.

Date: Friday, September 16
Time: 5:30-7 PM
PlaceSmith Reading Room, 1st floor Olin Library

Wesleyingiversary: The Origin Story

“Wesleyan is like History or God, it’s a vehicle people use to transmit ideas.”

cruitment

This is the first in our series of Wesleyingiversary interviews. You can find the rest here.

Approximately half-a-score ago, we arose from the womb of a 4am AIM conversation. At the time of its founding, Wesleying was at a Wesleyan where social media was only just beginning to make a mark on campus life. Twitter did not yet exist and it was still called “thefacebook.”

According to founders Holly Wood ’08 and Xue Sun ’08, Wes needed a vehicle to unite increasingly disparate segments of campus life, preserve Wes history, and inform the masses of party locations. And thus, Wesleying was born. A decade, lots of bloggers, and bushels of sarcasm later, you are reading this post.

You are reading this post because you want to know what happened when we caught up with Holly and Xue to celebrate the 5 year anniversary of the 5 year anniversary of Wesleying and talk about butt plugs (yes, those again) and flossing. Well, here’s our attempt at crafting an origin story: