Category Archives: Politics

Screening of “Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA”

making a killingFrom the Center for Film Studies:

Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA examines how guns, and the billions of dollars made from them, affect the lives of everyday Americans. It exposes the ways powerful gun companies and the NRA are resisting responsible legislation for the sake of profit. Producer Tara Vajra ’10 will host a Q&A after the screening.

Date: Tomorrow – Tuesday, March 7th
Time: 8pm
Place: The Center for Film Studies

Jewish Resistance at Aipac: Wesleyan Community Action Meeting

Matilda Ostow ’17 and Josh Bloom ’17 write in:

hello Wesleyan community!! we (matilda & josh) just completed a two day training with IfNotNow–a movement led by young Jews leading a Jewish resistance and seeking to end American Jewish support for the occupation.

we think the goals of this movement match up with a lot of feelings that young people across our country and on this campus specifically are feeling right now: the desire to fight for freedom and dignity for all! If you’re interested in learning more about this amazing organization that is fighting for the rights of palestinians, jews, and oppressed people’s all over the world and the HUGE action that they will be doing protesting outside of the annual AIPAC conference on March 26th, come to this event! It will be an inclusive space for learning, discussing, and understanding how we can develop our desires for resistance into organizing and action.

email jpbloom[at]wesleyan[dot]edu or mostow[at]wesleyan[dot]edu for any thoughts/inquiries/questions/comments/feelings ?

Date: Thursday, March 2
Time: 4:30-6 PM
Place: Albritton 311

College of Letters Open House

College of Letters lecture, Nov. 15, 2012.

Emily Furnival ’18 writes in: 

Have you ever wondered whether the College of Letters just studies the alphabet for three years? Never heard of the College of Letters? Like reading, writing, OR talking? Come to the COL Open House to get answers to all (we do mean all) of your questions! Talk to students and faculty to understand what the major is and whether it’s right for you.

The College of Letters is the interdisciplinary study of European Literature, History, Philosophy & Foreign Language. Through this program you will study with a small cohort of peers and two professors each semester. It’s a three year major and applications are due March 27th, so come by with questions!

Date: Monday and Tuesday, February 27-28th
Time: 4:30pm
Where: College of Letters Library (41 Wyllys, 3rd Floor)

In Depth: Wesleyan Refugee Project (Part 2)

Members of the Wesleyan Refugee Project

Libby Salzman-Fiske ’19, Caroline Kravitz ’19, and Sahar Shaikh ’17

Note: The information found in this feature was recorded in early to mid-February. Immigration and refugee policies in the United States are still in flux under the Trump administration, and the exact details regarding immigration laws and their enforcement may have changed since these interviews were conducted.

Since the Wesleyan Refugee Project (WRP) was founded in the Fall 2015, the volunteer organization has been hard at work in their contributions to resettlement programs, legal aid, tutoring services, and fundraising events. We spoke to one of the group’s founders, Casey Smith ’17, last September. Since then, it’s become even more difficult for refugees to enter the United States under Trump’s new immigration policies, and the future for refugee resettlement in the US is uncertain.

This semester, I spoke to several different members of the WRP, all in different leadership positions. I asked each of them how they got involved with WRP, what the group is focusing on this semester, and how other students can volunteer and participate. Read their stories after the jump:

Film Series Special Screening: Get Out

2017. USA. Dir: Jordan Peele. With Daniel
Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Bradley Whitford.


We’re delighted to present a free preview screening of this socially conscious horror flick. A young black man heads upstate to meet his white girlfriend’s parents, where he makes a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Wesleying’s Updated Calendar of Political Rallies and Events

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Looking to get organized? To help make this easier,  Wesleying has compiled another roundup of events in NYC and Connecticut between now and the end of the year with help from other awesome calendars on the ENGAGE blog and Women’s March CT’s Twitter. Also many thanks to my woke Facebook friends who I cyber-stalked to find some of these events. Enjoy!

We want to keep this list up to date, so if you hear about any new event or know about one we missed send us the info by e-mail at  staff[at]wesleying[dot]org or through Twitter/Facebook.

Senator Chris Murphy Visits Wesleyan for Town Hall on Environmental Policy

“At the end of each week, ask yourself: ‘Have I done this much this week as I did during the week of January 20th?'” – Chris Murphy

cmurphy

Last Thursday, February 2, at midnight, I got an email saying that U.S. Senator from Connecticut Chris Murphy was coming to hold a meeting on environmental policy on the morning of Saturday, February 4 and that there weren’t that many seats left at this late stage. The town hall was sponsored by the College of the Environment and the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life. The senator, notable for his Twitter takedowns of Donald Trump, took many questions on everything from general political engagement in these fiery times, to specific measures on the preservation of federal lands, and the precarious nature of environmental data in the Trump administration. He also answered a question on whether he would be considering a Presidential bid for 2020. Read past the jump for more on the town hall:

Guest Post: Former Iraqi Refugee Ahmed Badr ’20 on Trump’s Muslim Ban

“You can hate me for being muslim, or for being a refugee, but I will show you that your hate is ill founded by my appreciation for your voice and your perspective.”

abadr

Today, many in the Wesleyan community are in uproar in the wake of the news of Trump’s executive order banning immigration from 7 majority Muslim countries. Many students attended demonstrations at Bradley International Airport that protested the order. President Roth sent an all-campus email in response to the ban.

Ahmed Badr ’20 is closer to these issues than most. He moved to the U.S. as an Iraqi refugee with his parents when he was 10 years old. He is now a U.S. citizen and student, entrepreneur, youth leader, writer, poet, and photographer. He also founded a global storytelling platform called Narratio. On Sunday afternoon, he tweeted a statement about Trump’s Muslim Ban and has given us permission to republish his words here.

We know that this executive order (and the no doubt numerous to come) is having immediate effects on many in the Wesleyan community. If recent actions by the Trump administration are impacting you or your family and you have something to share, feel free to email us at staff[at]wesleying[dot]org.

Students, Alumni React to Trump’s Muslim Ban

jfk-airport-new-york

Earlier today, thousands gathered at JFK International Airport to protest the detaining of 12 people from the list of seven majority-Muslim countries covered in Trump’s executive order from yesterday. This order has suspended all immigration from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Yemen, Libya and Somalia for the next 90 days, regardless of visa and permanent resident status. The order also bans entry of all refugees for the next 120 days and the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely.

Among those at JFK earlier today was Casey Smith ’17, who gives more information about what’s going on there:

At least a dozen refugees and immigrants from the now-banned Muslim-majority countries were detained by Customs and Border Patrol inside JFK and more–unclear how many–were detained at airports around the country. The protests were posted on Facebook by immigrants’ rights and human rights activists, including Linda Sarsour. Lawyers from the International Refugee Assistance Project and the ACLU were inside the airport, by the arrivals gate, working to get in touch with the detained refugees. At the time of writing one Iraqi refugee had been released but the others were still detained. Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez (NY-7) was inside the airport and at the protests all day to advocate for CBP to release the refugees. Protestors shouted “no ban, no wall” and that immigrants/refugees/Muslims are welcome here.

Smith also said that it is important that those who are directly affected by the ban be centered in conversations about the policy. Read past the jump for reactions to the news: