Category Archives: Random

Procrastination Destination: Wikipedia Racing

We’re almost at finals week, which means it’s time for Wesleying’s biannual Procrastination Destination feature. If you’re like me, you’re probably wondering why you haven’t started studying yet. You should probably start studying… But if you need a good study break, you might as well procrastinate while learning new things.

So on that note, let me introduce you to Wikipedia Racing!

There are two forms of the game that you can play. The first version of the game is something that you play with your friends. The rules are simple:

  1. Choose an article to start on, and an article to end on. (For example, start on Justin Bieber, end on candy canes)
  2. You have to get from the first article to the destination article by only clicking on links within the wikipedia articles.
  3. First person to get to the ending article wins!
  4. For an extra challenge, you can add rules like no using the back button, or you can’t click through the United States (hot wikipedia racing tip, you can get to almost anything from the United States Wikipedia article). You can also change the rules and say that the person who finds the shortest path to the destination article wins, regardless of how long it takes. You can really add any rules you want to, it’s a very flexible game.

Using the example I gave before (Justin Bieber to candy canes), here is a demonstration of how Wikipedia racing works.

Justin Bieber –> Under the Mistletoe –> Christmas Music –> Christmas –> Candy Canes

That was a pretty easy example, but you can do some really weird ones, like Limes to the Treaty of Versailles, or Las Meninas to Wesleyan University. Maybe you can trick yourself into feeling like you are studying by choosing topics for the start/end articles that are related to your work. If you are having trouble thinking of articles, try the random Wikipedia article generator.

As for the other version of Wikipedia Racing, maybe you want to procrastinate alone in the library, or you don’t want your friends to see you avoiding your work. Fear not! There is also an antisocial version of Wikipedia Racing that you can play online. The online version of the game decides the start and end articles for you (you can’t even pretend like you are studying), but it is still a great way to avoid your work.

Usdan Jams: Pastability by Lorde

It was late for a Usdan night, approaching the 7:30 mark. The only people left getting dinner were the night owls, squinting in the bright Marketplace lights. It is at this time of night that Usdan becomes very simple; gone are the lines that make cheesesteak night or Pastabilites so urgent and the air has taken on a new tone. As the first blue notes of Lorde’s “Liability” flowed through my earbuds, it was matched with another sound:

“Go ahead!”

I looked up, and something clicked. How had I not seen it before? The signs were all too obvious. It had been hidden in plain sight. Somehow, somewhere, Lorde’s healing anthem was connected to Wesleyan’s own Pastabilities. And, since Pastabilities is Tom the Pastabilities Guy, somehow he and Lorde are connected.

“Go ahead!” I hadn’t realized it was my turn. I was too busy staring into Tom’s eyes, trying to figure out when/how he had hurt Lorde, or perhaps vice-versa. After apologizing profusely and getting my alfredo with white (sauce first, I wasn’t that distracted), I ate with haste and went back to my dorm to do my research, window shades down, glasses on.

Original Content Makers Must Seize the Memes of Production

We’re in a tough spot. Our age group has to deal with a melting planet, a thriving possum population, and a plethora of potential employers that expect us to know how to use Excel. That sucks for us sassy NESCAC kids. In spite of these obstacles, there is supposed to be a light in the dark, a city upon a hill, a beautiful beacon of hope: memes.

But, alas, Wesleyan’s meme culture is less than ideal. I would call it bad.

Write In: Kids That Look Like Their Parents

It’s Family Weekend, and there are a ton of parents on campus. Have people mistaken you and your parent for siblings? Have you spotted a parent and child that look identical?

We want pictures! Email us  (staff[at]wesleying[dot]org) your Family Weekend pictures of identical parent/child pairs with the subject “Parent Write In” and your name and class year in the body (as well as the name and class year of the people in the picture), and we’ll feature you guys on Wesleying!

WesPortal Dot Com is a Magical Meme Wonderland

Editor’s note: The original post incorrectly identified the URL of the site as wesmaps.com. We apologize for the error and will fact-check our memes more thoroughly in the future.

Wisly Juganda ’20 tipped us off to wesportal.com, a wacky alternate universe version of WesMaps/WesPortal (are we in the upside-down???).

Featuring a tiled background of “If Michael Roth Was A Character From Harry Potter, He Would Be Dumbledore, Says Michael Roth,” the site is evocative of geocities. This seems like a fitting tribute to the 10 year anniversary of the inauguration of Michael Roth ’78 as Wesleyan’s President, which just so happens to be today.

You can add to the message board on the left side, which currently has posts like, “Can I access moodle from this” from guest and ‘i hate this’ from our very own michael roth.

In the center of the site, there’s the infamous bagel pb&j that haunted Soggy We$ Memes in a 3-post saga (courtesy of Oren Maximov ’17), complete with a poll to respond to the question of whether the bagel pb&j is indeed a sandwich.

At the bottom of the page there’s this gem (the button tragically doesn’t work, so you’re stuck with the points calculator):

There’s also a button saying, “Click here to go to the real Wesportal,” but, in an infuriating game of cat and mouse, it moves everytime you try to click on it.

We are extremely curious who did this, so if you have any leads, send them our way (staff[at]wesleying[dot]org)!

Halloween Costume Round Up 2017!

“For your viewing pleasure”
Ed Thorndike ’89 of WesWings

Alright, ya’ll. It’s the day that we all look forward to. It’s the end of Spooptober, the start of Christmas, because we can’t capitalize off of Thanksgiving, unless it’s Black Friday.

It’s Halloween. And did ya’ll impress. We asked (yesterday) for your costumes, and I think my eyes are still burning I’m very impressed by the creativity of the student body.

Check out the costumes after the jump!

Read These Jinn Stories if You Wanna Get Properly Spooked this Halloween

Every year, in search of some solid Halloween spookiness, I inevitably end up searching the internet for stories about jinns. What’s a jinn you ask? They show up in pop culture every so often; the jinn, or genie, that you probably know best is the Genie from Aladdin.

Jinns feature prominently in Islamic mythology. What’s interesting about the genre is that Jinns are actually based on Islamic literature and theology, and they’re mentioned many times in the Quran. Basically, if you believe in Islam, a belief in jinns tags along whether you want it to or not… kind of like your kid sister that follows you everywhere. For many Muslims such as myself, this lends the concept of Jinns a legitimacy that your average ghost story doesn’t have.

Also, shout out to the Buzzfeed podcast See Something Say Something by Ahmed Ali Akbar for doing an awesome yearly Halloween episode about jinns and halaloween ;)

Read on for some more background on jinns, as well as some jinn stories that’ll creep you the fuck out. I’ll leave you to decide whether you want to believe them or not.

THESISCRAZY 2017 (PART 10): THE END

“Then eventually, you reach something so esoteric that you can imagine a little notification: ‘Congratulations! You’ve reached no-man’s-land!’”

Not exactly the kind of champagne bath we’re talking about…

Welcome to the tenth and final installment of THESISCRAZY 2017! We’ve had a blast talking to 45 (!!!) thesis-writers this year representing 23 different departments! AMST and FILM tied for the lead with 7 THESISCRAZY interviews each! Not quite the 95 theses of Martin Luther, but it still beat Wesleying’s record of 40 interviews in 2016! You can check out all nine previous THESISCRAZY 2017 posts here, here, herehereherehereherehere, and here (phew!) and you can find the entire archive here.

As you’re making the final finishing touches and mentally preparing for the champagne bath you’re about to take at 4 PM on the Olin Steps (Maybe your first bath in days? We’re not judging!), check out these final interviews!

Congratulations to everyone who embarked on the wild journey of writing a thesis this year! (And if you’re an underclassperson reading these, we hope to get to interview you when it’s your turn to go through this special hell!)

THEISISCRAZY 2017 (PART 3): The Longest and Shortest Interviews Ever

“The last three days I’ve been working straight 9-5, and I mean 9 AM to 5 AM!”

Hello crazy thesis-ers and also crazy other people reading this! In this third installment of THESISCRAZY 2017, I bring to you the longest interview I’ve seen in my tenure at Wesleyan, clocking in at just over 20 minutes, and the shortest, at just under four. You can check my unscientific assertion for yourself by reading our archive here and checking out the first two posts of the series here and here.

If you’re interested in being interviewed (preferably for shorter than 20 minutes and longer than 4–eight to ten is usually the sweet spot!), email staff(at)wesleying(dot)org with your name, major, workspace/carrel number, and times you can meet before April 19th.

Hold onto your hats for this whirlwind of a ride after the jump!